David Douglas Duncan
[Photojournalist, b. 1916, Kansas City, Missouri, lives in Mougins, France.]

 It’s very simple... this banging around with a camera and typewriter as a “business” is just one helluva lot of fun. 

Edward Steichen
[Photographer and curator, b. 1879, Luxembourg, Germany, d. 1973, West Redding, Connecticut.]

 A photograph is worth a thousand words, provided it is accompanied by only ten words. 

Terence Donovan
[Photographer, b. 1936, Stepney, England, d. 1996, London.]

 You don’t do something like this for money. I’ve never met anyone who’s succeeded in life purely because they wanted the cash. 

Paul Strand
[Photographer, b. 1890, New York, d. 1976, Oregeval, France.]

 All good art is abstract in its structure. 

John Baldessari
[Artist, b. 1931, National City, California, lives in Venice, California.]

 I have no particular allegiance to photography, other than it’s quick. 

Henri Cartier-Bresson
[Photographer and painter, b. 1908, Chanteloup, France, d. 2004, Paris.]

 Thinking should be done beforehand and afterwards—never while actually taking a photograph. 

Margaret Bourke-White
[Photographer, b. 1904, New York, d. 1971, Darien, Connecticut.]

 Saturate yourself with your subject and the camera will all but take you by the hand. 

David Levi Strauss
[Writer and critic, b. 1953, Junction City, Kansas, lives in New York.]

 The attack on New York’s Twin Towers was the most photographed event in history. It was clearly planned and executed to maximize imaging. The delay between the two crashes seemed calculated to allow cameras—in what is arguably the most densely camera-rich environment in the world—to turn en masse toward the towers like a field of phototropic sunflowers.