David Maisel
[Photographer, b. 1961, New York, lives in San Francisco.]

 The limits of photography have always existed in a changing, fluid dynamic form. Cameras, lenses, papers, films, and, yes, digital technologies come and go. They are the current on which photography rides, but not the substance of what makes a photograph a worthy work of art. 

Frederick Sommer
[Photographer, b. 1905, Angri, Italy, d. 1999, Prescott, Arizona.]

 The world of art and the world of science are interested in evidence and verification. 

Jason Fulford
[Photographer, b. 1973, Atlanta, Georgia, lives in Scranton, Pennsylvania.]

 We all are influenced by things and copy things, but often where there is a certain level of copying, only the surface value ends up being reproduced and that becomes thinner and thinner. I feel like a lot of appropriation suffers from that. 

Donald McCullin
[Photographer, b. 1935, Finsbury Park, London, lives in Somerset, England.]

 You cannot walk on the water of hunger, misery, and death. You have to wade through to record them. 

Sylvia Plachy
[Photographer, b. 1943, Budapest, Hungary, lives in New York.]

 Stop and go: always on some journey. My bounty is a photograph or two. 

Nathan Lyons
[Photographer, writer, and curator, b. 1930, Jamaica, New York, d. 2016, Rochester, New York.]

 The accidents of millions of amateurs devoid of a picture vocabulary—which produced an outpouring of multiple exposures, distortions, unusual perspectives, foreshortening of planes, imbalance—has contributed greatly to the visual vocabulary of all media since before the turn of the century. 

Geoff Dyer
[Writer and critic, b. 1958, Cheltenham, England, lives in London.]

 These days any self-respecting exhibition of nude photos has to have pornographically explicit images to prove that they are works of art. 

James Nachtwey
[Photographer, b. 1948, Syracuse, New York, lives in New York.]

 I used to call myself a war photographer. Now I consider myself as an antiwar photographer.