Jeff Wall
[Photographer, b. 1946, Vancouver, Canada, lives in Vancouver.]

 One paradox I have found is that, the more you use computers in picture-making, the more “hand-made” the picture becomes. Oddly, then, digital technology is leading, in my work at least, toward a greater reliance on handmaking because the assembly and montage of the various parts of the picture is done very carefully by hand. 

John Berger
[Writer and critic, b. 1926, London, d. 2017, Paris.]

 A photograph is static because it has stopped time. A painting or drawing is static because it encompasses time. 

Philip Jones Griffiths
[Photojournalist, b. 1936, Rhuddian, Wales, d. 2008, London.]

 [Photojournalism] really is the only branch of photography that’s a credit to our profession. We see, we understand; we see more, we understand more. 

Lewis Baltz
[Photographer, b. 1945, Newport Beach, California, d. 2014, Paris.]

 In my research, my interest has always been with the phenomenal margin, those areas that are not quite landscape, not quite visible, the marginally taboo, the nearly obscene. 

Mary Ellen Mark
[Photographer, b. 1940, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, d. 2015, New York.]

 I just think it’s important to be direct and honest with people about why you’re photographing them and what you’re doing. After all, you are taking some of their soul, and I think you have to be clear about that. 

Douglas Crimp
[Writer, theorist and critic, b. 1944, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, lives in Rochester, New York.]

 The desire of representation exists only insofar as the original is always deferred. It is only in the absence of the original that representation can take place. 

Idris Khan
[Artist, b. 1978, Birmingham, England, lives in London.]

 I try and grasp the essence of a particular work, fuck about with it on the computer, and then display all the essence of a complete work on the wall. 

Harry Callahan
[Photographer, b. 1912, Detroit, Michigan, d. 1999, Atlanta, Georgia.]

 Everything was Bauhaus this and Bauhaus that. I wanted to break it... I got tired of experimentation. I got sick of the solarization and reticulation and walked-on negatives. What I was interested in was the technique of seeing... I introduced problems like “evidence of man,” and talking to people—making portraits on the street... I thought [the students] should enter into dealings with human beings and leave abstract photography. I felt that social photography would be the next concern.