Peter Henry Emerson
[Writer and photographer, b. 1856, LaPalma, Cuba, d. 1936, Falmouth, Cornwall, England.]

 The photographer does not make his picture—a machine does it all for him. (1891, in a recantation of his earlier advocacy of photography as art.) 

John Sexton
[Photographer, b. 1953, Maywood, California, lives in California.]

 Pictures you have taken have an influence on those that you are going to make. That’s life! 

Salvador Dali (Salvador Felipe Jacinto Dalí Domènech, Marquis of Pubol)
[Artist, b. 1904, Figueres, Catalonia, Spain, d. 1989, Figueres, Spain.]

 Photographic data... is still and ESSENTIALLY THE SAFEST POETIC MEDIUM and the most agile process for catching the most delicate osmoses which exist between reality and surreality. The mere fact of photographic transposition means a total invention: the capture of a secret reality. 

Douglas Crimp
[Writer, theorist and critic, b. 1944, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, lives in Rochester, New York.]

 The strategy of the [directorial] mode is to use the apparent veracity of photography against itself, creating one’s fictions through the appearance of a seamless reality into which has been woven a narrative dimension. (1980) 

Duane Michals
[Photographer, b. 1932, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, lives in New York.]

 You go to these schools, and the kids all show you gorgeous prints of water running over pebbles. I’d rather see a not-so-gorgeous mistake of a brilliant idea, an idea that maybe the kid didn’t even know how to solve technically, but who cares, because he’s talking about something incredible. It’s not the medium, it’s the message for me. 

Douglas Coupland
[Writer, b. 1961, Baden-Söllingen, Germany, lives in Vancouver, Canada.]

 I tried to think of a witty play on “Every picture tells a thousand words,” but then the whole word/picture thing collapsed on me. 

Alfred Stieglitz
[Photographer and curator, b. 1864, Hoboken, New Jersey, d. 1946, New York.]

 Technically perfect, pictorially rotten. (Stieglitz’s standard comment on photographs he rejected for publication in The American Amateur Photographer.) 

Chris Killip
[Photographer, b. 1946, Douglas, Isle of Man, United Kingdom, lives in Boston.]

 I don’t like smiley pictures. A smile is a defense mechanism. It says, “You can’t have the real me but here’s my smile.” You get closer to the real person when they stop smiling.