Ron Galella
[Photographer, b. 1931, Bronx, New York, lives in New York.]

 My style is the paparazzi approach which is spontaneous, unrehearsed, off-guard. The beauty I’m after is inherent, more natural. Genuine emotions, real emotions, that’s what I look for. 

Marc Riboud
[Photographer, b. 1923, St.-Genis-Laval, France, d. 2016, Paris.]

 My first reaction at the very idea of this interview was to refuse to talk about photography. Why dissect and comment a process that is essentially a spontaneous reaction to a surprise? 

Garry Winogrand
[Photographer, b. 1928, New York, d. 1984, Tijuana, Mexico.]

 You know, you’ve heard photographers talk about how they want to know the place better and so on—they’re really talking about their own comfort. Let me put it this way—I have never seen a photograph from which I could tell how long the photographer was there, how well he knew it. 

James Nachtwey
[Photographer, b. 1948, Syracuse, New York, lives in New York.]

 Do we really need another picture of Paris Hilton or Naomi Campbell? 

Richard Avedon
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 2004, San Antonio, Texas.]

 My portraits are more about me than they are about the people I photograph. 

Wright Morris
[Writer and photographer, b. 1910, Central City, Nebraska, d. 1998, Mill Valley, California.]

 It is the camera that takes the picture; the photographer is a collaborator. 

Louis Aragon
[Artist, poet, and writer, b. 1897, Neuilly, France, d. 1982, Paris.]

 As we know, cubism was a reaction on the part of painters to the invention of photography. Photography and cinema made struggling for exact likeness childish. (1935) 

Richard Avedon
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 2004, San Antonio, Texas.]

 If each photograph steals a bit of the soul, isn’t it possible that I give up pieces of mine every time I take a picture?