Robert Heinecken
[Photographer, b. 1931, Denver, d. 2006, Albuquerque, New Mexico.]

 Many pictures turn out to be limp translations of the known world instead of vital objects which create an intrinsic world of their own. There is a vast difference between taking a picture and making a photograph. 

Heinrich Heine
[Writer, b. 1797, Düsseldorf, Germany, d. 1856, Paris.]

 Photography is a witness against the mistaken opinion that art is an imitation of nature. 

Bret Harte
[Writer, b. 1836, Albany, New York, d. 1902, London.]

 Besides writing, I have been teaching myself to ‘develop’ my own photographic plates, and I haven’t a stick of clothing or an exposed finger that isn’t stained. I sit for hours in a dark-room feeling as if I were a very elderly Faust at some dreadful incantation, and come out of it, blinding at the light, like a Bastille prisoner. And yet I am not successful! 

Dave Hickey
[Writer and critic, b. 1939, rural Texas, lives in Los Angeles.]

 As a step-child of the Factory, I am certain of one thing: images can change the world. I have seen it happen—experienced the “Before and After,” as Andy might say—so I know that images can alter the visual construction of reality we all inhabit, can revise the expectations that we bring to it and priorities that we impose on it—and know, further, that these alterations can entail profound social and political ramifications. 

Ernest Hemingway
[Writer, b. 1899, Oak Park, Illinois, d. 1961, Ketchum, Idaho.]

 [Robert] Capa: He was a good friend and a great and very brave photographer. It is bad luck for everybody that the percentages caught up with him. It is especially bad for Capa. (On Capa’s death in Vietnam, May, 27, 1954) 

John Heartfield (Helmut Franz Joseph Herzfeld)
[Artist, b. 1891, Munich, Germany, d. 1968, Berlin.]

 Use Photography as a Weapon! (Sign over the entrance to the John Heartfield room at the 1929 “Film und Foto” exhibition in Stuttgart.) 

Hannah Höch
[Artist and photographer, b. 1889, Gotha, Germany, d. 1978, Berlin.]

 Of course, the camera is a far more objective and trustworthy witness than a human being. We know that a Brueghel or Goya or James Ensor can have visions or hallucinations, but it is generally admitted that a camera can photograph only what is actually there, standing in the real world before its lens. 

Douglas Huebler
[Photographer and artist, b. 1924, Ann Arbor, Michigan, d. 1997, Truro, Massachusetts.]

 The world is full of objects, more or less interesting; I do not wish to add any more.