John Herschel
[Mathematician, astronomer, and discoverer that hyposulphite of soda fixes photographs, b. 1792, Slough, Buckinghamshire, England, d. 1871, Hawkhurst, Kent, England.]

 It is hardly too much to call [daguerreotypes] miraculous. Certainly they surpass anything I could have conceived as within the bounds of reasonable expectation... I cannot commend you better than to come and see. Excuse this ebullition! (To William Henry Fox Talbot, 1839.) 

Richard Hennessy
[Artist and critic, b. 1941, lives in New York.]

 Photography bears the same relationship to fine art that figure skating does to ballet. (1979) 

Fred Hoyle
[Astronomer and writer, b. 1915, Bingley, Yorkshire, England, d. 2001, Bournemouth, England.]

 Once a photograph of the Earth, taken from outside, is available, we shall, in an emotional sense, acquire an additional dimension... Once let the sheer isolation of the Earth become plain to every man, whatever his nationality or creed, and a new idea as powerful as any in history will be let loose. (1948) 

Dave Hickey
[Writer and critic, b. 1939, rural Texas, lives in Los Angeles.]

 As a step-child of the Factory, I am certain of one thing: images can change the world. I have seen it happen—experienced the “Before and After,” as Andy might say—so I know that images can alter the visual construction of reality we all inhabit, can revise the expectations that we bring to it and priorities that we impose on it—and know, further, that these alterations can entail profound social and political ramifications. 

Ernest Hemingway
[Writer, b. 1899, Oak Park, Illinois, d. 1961, Ketchum, Idaho.]

 [Robert] Capa: He was a good friend and a great and very brave photographer. It is bad luck for everybody that the percentages caught up with him. It is especially bad for Capa. (On Capa’s death in Vietnam, May, 27, 1954) 

Adolph Hitler
[Politician, b. 1889, Braunau am Inn, Austria, d. 1945, Berlin, Germany.]

 No politician should ever let himself be photographed in a bathing suit. 

Dennis Hopper
[Actor, artist, and photographer, b. 1936, Dodge City, Kansas, d. 2010, Venice, California.]

 I think of [my photographs] as “found” paintings because I don’t crop them, I don’t manipulate them or anything. So they’re like “found” objects to me. 

Werner Herzog
[Filmmaker, b. 1942, Sachrang, Germany, lives in Munich and Los Angeles.]

 It’s like death staring at you when you look at a camera.