Robert Heinecken
[Photographer, b. 1931, Denver, d. 2006, Albuquerque, New Mexico.]

 Some of my enthusiasm for the [found] photograph was based on the fact that there was some residual illusion of reality in it always, no matter what I did to it. 

Dave Hickey
[Writer and critic, b. 1939, rural Texas, lives in Los Angeles.]

 As a step-child of the Factory, I am certain of one thing: images can change the world. I have seen it happen—experienced the “Before and After,” as Andy might say—so I know that images can alter the visual construction of reality we all inhabit, can revise the expectations that we bring to it and priorities that we impose on it—and know, further, that these alterations can entail profound social and political ramifications. 

bell hooks
[Educator and writer, b. 1952, Hopkinsville, Kentucky, lives in New York.]

 For black folks, the camera provided a means to document a reality that could, if necessary, be packed, stored, moved from place to place... [Photography] offered a way to contain memories, to overcome loss, to keep history. 

Joe Julius Heydecker
[Writer and photographer, b. 1916, Nürnberg, Germany, d. 1997, Vienna.]

 I am guilty: I stood there and took photographs instead of doing something. Even then I was aware of this terrible dilemma. To ask what I could have done than is a coward’s question. Something. Kill one of the guards with my bayonet. Raise my rifle against an officer. Desert and go over to the other side. Refuse service. Sabotage. Refuse to obey orders. Give my life. Today I feel there is no excuse. (On his trips as a Nazi soldier photographing Jews in the Warsaw ghetto. He began in 1941 and ended in 1944 when there was no ghetto and there were no Jews.) 

Heinrich Heine
[Writer, b. 1797, Düsseldorf, Germany, d. 1856, Paris.]

 Photography is a witness against the mistaken opinion that art is an imitation of nature. 

John Heartfield (Helmut Franz Joseph Herzfeld)
[Artist, b. 1891, Munich, Germany, d. 1968, Berlin.]

 Use Photography as a Weapon! (Sign over the entrance to the John Heartfield room at the 1929 “Film und Foto” exhibition in Stuttgart.) 

Martin Heidegger
[Philosopher, b. 1889, Messkirch, Baden, Germany, d. 1976, Messkirch.]

 When we reflect on the modern age, we are questioning the modern world picture... Wherever we have the world picture, an essential decision takes place regarding what is, in its entirety... The fundamental event of the modern age is the conquest of the world as picture. The word ‘picture’ [Bild] now means the structured picture [Gebild] that is the creature of man’s producing which represents and sets before... 

Langston Hughes
[Writer, b. 1902, Joplin, Missouri, d. 1967, New York.]

 A picture, to be an interesting picture, must be more than a picture, otherwise it is only a reproduction of an object, and not an object of value in itself.