Nigel Henderson
[Photographer, b. 1917, London, d. 1985, Thorpe-le-Soken, Essex, England.]

 If you encounter photography for yourself and if you’re restless, you’re going to reinvent photography for a while. 

Michael Herr
[Writer, b. 1940, Syracuse, New York, lives in London.]

 ...you were as responsible for everything you saw as you were for everything you did. The problem was that you didn’t always know what you were seeing until later, that a lot of it never made it in at all, just stayed there stored in your eyes. 

Hermann Hesse
[Writer, b. 1877, Calw, Germany, d. 1962, Montagnola, Switzerland.]

 When artists create pictures and thinkers search for laws and formulate thoughts, it is in order to salvage something from the great dance of death, to make something last longer than we do. 

Ernest Hemingway
[Writer, b. 1899, Oak Park, Illinois, d. 1961, Ketchum, Idaho.]

 [Robert] Capa: He was a good friend and a great and very brave photographer. It is bad luck for everybody that the percentages caught up with him. It is especially bad for Capa. (On Capa’s death in Vietnam, May, 27, 1954) 

Anthony Hernandez
[Photographer, b. 1947, Los Angeles, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The reason I started photographing in downtown Los Angeles was not because of the work of other street photographers. It’s because I grew up there. Naturally, if I’m going to take pictures, I’m going to take pictures of places I know. 

Hiroshi Hamaya
[Photographer, b. 1915, Tokyo, Japan, d. 1999, Kanagawa, Japan.]

 I like the idea that my work isn’t intended only for the Earth, but for the entire Universe. 

Nathaniel Hawthorne
[Writer, b. 1804, Salem, Massachusetts, d. 1864, Plymouth, New Hampshire.]

 [I wish] there was something in the intellectual world analogous to the Daguerreotype... in the visible—something which should print off our deepest, subtlest, and delicatest thoughts and feelings, as minutely and accurately as the above-mentioned instrument paints the various aspects of Nature. (1839) 

Langston Hughes
[Writer, b. 1902, Joplin, Missouri, d. 1967, New York.]

 Anyday, one can walk down the street in a big city and see a thousand people. Any photographer can photograph these people—but very few photographers can make their prints not only reproductions of the people taken, but a comment upon them—or more, a comment upon their lives—or more still, a comment upon the social order that creates these lives.