Fred Hoyle
[Astronomer and writer, b. 1915, Bingley, Yorkshire, England, d. 2001, Bournemouth, England.]

 Well, we now have such a photograph... Has any new idea been let loose? It certainly has. You will have noticed how suddenly everybody has become seriously concerned to protect the natural environment... It seems to me more than a coincidence that this awareness should have happened at exactly the moment man took his first step into space. 

Eikoh Hosoe
[Photographer, b. 1933, Yonezawa, Yamagata Prefecture, Japan, lives in Tokyo.]

 The camera is generally assumed to be unable to depict that which is not visible to the eye. And yet the photographer who wields it well can depict what lies unseen in his memory. 

Florence Henri
[Photographer, b. 1893, New York, d. 1982, Laboissière-en-Thelle, France.]

 What I want above all in photography is to compose the image as I do with paintings. It is necessary that the volumes, lines, the shadows and light obey my will and say what I want them to say. 

Richard Hennessy
[Artist and critic, b. 1941, lives in New York.]

 Photography bears the same relationship to fine art that figure skating does to ballet. (1979) 

Dennis Hopper
[Actor, artist, and photographer, b. 1936, Dodge City, Kansas, d. 2010, Venice, California.]

 I think of [my photographs] as “found” paintings because I don’t crop them, I don’t manipulate them or anything. So they’re like “found” objects to me. 

Hugh Hefner
[Publisher and playboy, b. 1926, Chicago, d. 2017, Los Angeles.]

 I suggested that sex was not the enemy, that violence was the enemy, that nice girls like sex. The centerfold itself, the girl-next-door-centerfold, in a very simplistic way was rooted in that philosophy, that that sex is okay, it’s a natural part of life, a very radical idea in America... 

David Hockney
[Artist, b. 1937, Bradford, England, lives in Bridlington, Yorkshire; London; and Los Angeles.]

 I mean, photography is all right if you don’t mind looking at the world from the point of view of a paralyzed cyclops—for a split second. But that's not what it’s like to live in the world, or to convey the experience of living in the world. 

Martin Heidegger
[Philosopher, b. 1889, Messkirch, Baden, Germany, d. 1976, Messkirch.]

 When we reflect on the modern age, we are questioning the modern world picture... Wherever we have the world picture, an essential decision takes place regarding what is, in its entirety... The fundamental event of the modern age is the conquest of the world as picture. The word ‘picture’ [Bild] now means the structured picture [Gebild] that is the creature of man’s producing which represents and sets before...