Eikoh Hosoe
[Photographer, b. 1933, Yonezawa, Yamagata Prefecture, Japan, lives in Tokyo.]

 To me photography can be simultaneously a record and a “mirror” or “window” of self-expression. 

David Octavius Hill
[Photographer, b. 1802, Perth, Scotland, d. 1870, Newington, Scotland.]

 The rough surface and unequal texture throughout of the paper is the main cause of the Calotype failing in details before the process of Daguerreotypy—and this is the very life of it. They look like the imperfect work of man—and not the much diminished perfect work of God. (1848) 

Frank Horvat
[Photographer, b. 1928, Abbazia, Italy, now Opatija, Croatia, lives in Paris.]

 ...photography is made essentially of time. I often think that what we show is a point in time, more than a window onto space. 

Nigel Henderson
[Photographer, b. 1917, London, d. 1985, Thorpe-le-Soken, Essex, England.]

 If you encounter photography for yourself and if you’re restless, you’re going to reinvent photography for a while. 

Robert Heinecken
[Photographer, b. 1931, Denver, d. 2006, Albuquerque, New Mexico.]

 Many pictures turn out to be limp translations of the known world instead of vital objects which create an intrinsic world of their own. There is a vast difference between taking a picture and making a photograph. 

Raoul Hausmann
[Artist, b. 1886, Vienna, d. 1971, Limoges, France.]

 What is important is that our optical awareness rids itself of classical notions of beauty and opens itself more and more to the beauty of the instant and of these surprising points of view that appear for a brief moment and never return; those are what make photography an art. 

Todd Hido
[Photographer, b. 1968, Kent, Ohio, lives in San Francisco.]

 I have learned to consciously avoid letting that thought, “It’s been done,” enter my creative process. You have to try not to edit yourself before you actually shoot. 

Candida Höfer
[Photographer, b. 1944, Eberswalde, Germany, lives in Cologne, Germany.]

 I do my work. My work is my statement. Generally, I think, there is too much interest in what an artist has to say. Or what she or he looks like, instead of what she or he does.