Jan Dibbets
[Artist, b. 1941, Weert, The Netherlands, lives in Amsterdam.]

 I start by thinking I’m going to make use of all possibilities without troubling any longer about problems when something starts to be art. I don’t make the ETERNAL work of ART, I only give visual information. 

Rineke Dijkstra
[Photographer, b. 1959, Sittard, The Netherlands, lives in Amsterdam.]

 A photo is always a kind of lie. Truth is only present for a matter of a fraction of a second. 

Alphonse de Lamartine
[Writer, poet, and politician, b. 1790, Mâcon, France, d. 1869, Paris.]

 It is because of the servility of photography that I am fundamentally contemptuous of this chance invention which will never be an art but which plagiarizes nature by means of optics. (1848) 

The Dalai Lama (Lhamo Dhondrub)
[Spiritual leader, b. 1935, Taktser, Tibet, lives in exile.]

 I know the earth is round by relying on the words of someone who has seen it and proved it with photographs... You have to rely on a person who has already had this kind of experience and has no reason to tell lies. (Explaining the Buddhist concept of extremely hidden phenomena.) 

Corinne Day
[Photographer, b. 1962, Ealing, West London, d. 2010, Denham, England.]

 I must be [an artist]. My pictures are in an art gallery. 

Joe Deal
[Photographer, b. 1947, Topeka, Kansas, d. 2010, Providence, Rhode Island.]

 My work is about the transformation of the landscape. My interest is in the boundaries—the lines of tension—between the environment and the construction of culture. 

Geoff Dyer
[Writer and critic, b. 1958, Cheltenham, England, lives in London.]

 [William] Eggleston’s photographs look like they were taken by a Martian who lost the ticket for his flight home and ended up working at a gun shop in a small town near Memphis. On the weekend he searches for the ticket—it must be somewhere—with a haphazard thoroughness that confounds established methods of investigation. 

Denis Donoghue
[Critic, b. 1928, Tullow, County Carlow, Ireland, lives in New York.]

 The camera has an interest in turning history into spectacle, but none in reversing the process. At best, the picture leaves a vague blur in the observer’s mind; strong enough to send him into battle perhaps, but not to have him understand why he is going.