Roy DeCarava
[Photographer, b. 1919, New York, d. 2009, Brooklyn, New York.]

 A photograph is a photograph, a picture, an image, an illusion complete within itself, depending neither on words, reproductive processes or anything else for its life, its reason for being. 

Corinne Day
[Photographer, b. 1962, Ealing, West London, d. 2010, Denham, England.]

 [My brain tumor] was like a bungee jump into hell, like falling and falling forever. It was terrifying, I gave Mark my camera, and told him, “Photograph everything.” 

Barbara DeGenevieve
[Photographer, artist, and curator, b. 1947, d. 2014, Chicago, Illinois.]

 As an academic I feel I should intellectualize and theoretically analyze when all I really want to do is let the work take me somewhere, manipulate me, and then rough me up a bit. When it comes right down to it, I only want to spend time with work that makes me think and teaches me something while making my body react. 

Gilles Deleuze
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1925, Paris, d. 1995, Paris.]

 Photography, if there is photography, is already snapped, already shot, in the very interior of things and for all points of space. 

Eugène Delacroix
[Artist, b. 1798, Charenton-St.Maurice, France, d. 1863, Paris.]

 [Photography is] in some ways false just because it is so exact. 

André Derain
[Artist, b. 1880, Chatou, France, d. 1954, Chambourcy, France.]

 It was the era of photography. This may have influenced us, and played a part in our reaction against anything resembling a snapshot of life. (On the year 1905) 

Allan deSouza
[Artist and writer, b. 1958, Nairobi, Kenya, lives in Los Angeles.]

 Photography is now so vital to memory, as a safeguard that the past will not be erased. With the Jewish Holocaust, for example, photographs have become so central to the process of remembering—not necessarily private, but certainly collective, and ironically, we often rely, as with the Khmer Rouge, on the photographs taken by the murderers. 

John Divola
[Photographer, b. 1949, Los Angeles, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The photograph as an object has a relationship to that which it represents something like the relationship the snake skin has to the snake that sheds it.