Patrick Demarchelier
[Photographer, b. 1943, Le Havre, France, lives in New York.]

 Fashion is the opposite of the real, its worst enemy. Fashion photography is subversive; it makes you believe everything is true, whereas this could not be more false. It is the opposite of a mirror, a deformation. 

Raymond Depardon
[Photographer and filmmaker, b. 1942, Villefranche-sur-Saône, France, lives in Paris.]

 I don’t regret the numerous pictures of Brigitte Bardot, but I’d rather have a good photograph of my father. 

George Davison
[Photographer, b. 1854, Lowestoft, England, d. 1930, Antibes, France.]

 ...given a subject with really strong poetic possibilities in it, sharpness and detail will go a long way to render it commonplace. (1889) 

Nell Dorr
[Photographer, b. 1895, Cleveland, Ohio, d. 1988, Washington, Connecticut.]

 The medium of photography adapts itself to whoever you are. 

Frederick Douglass
[Writer, orator, activist, b. 1818, Talbot County, Maryland, d. 1895, Washington, D.C..]

 Poets, prophets and reformers are all picture makers—and this ability is the secret of their power and of their achievements. 

Eugène Delacroix
[Artist, b. 1798, Charenton-St.Maurice, France, d. 1863, Paris.]

 [Photography is] in some ways false just because it is so exact. 

James Dean
[Actor, b. 1931, Marion, Indiana, d. 1955, Cholame, California.]

 Can’t you see? I’m Michelangelo’s David. (Explaining his pose to photographer Roy Schatt.) 

Régis Durand
[Critic, writer, and curator, lives in Paris.]

 Why is it that so many photographers today are driven to catalogue the traces or signs of what is supposed to appear or happen in the world? How can we explain this mania for the real, for things that, after all, simply exist?