Georges Didi-Huberman
[Writer and thinker, b. 1953, Saint-Etienne, France, lives in Paris.]

 Does inadequacy not characterize all that we make use of to perceive and describe the world? Are the signs of language not just as “inadequate,” albeit differently, as are images? 

Geoff Dyer
[Writer and critic, b. 1958, Cheltenham, England, lives in London.]

 [William] Eggleston’s photographs look like they were taken by a Martian who lost the ticket for his flight home and ended up working at a gun shop in a small town near Memphis. On the weekend he searches for the ticket—it must be somewhere—with a haphazard thoroughness that confounds established methods of investigation. 

André Derain
[Artist, b. 1880, Chatou, France, d. 1954, Chambourcy, France.]

 It was the era of photography. This may have influenced us, and played a part in our reaction against anything resembling a snapshot of life. (On the year 1905) 

Allan deSouza
[Artist and writer, b. 1958, Nairobi, Kenya, lives in Los Angeles.]

 Photography is now so vital to memory, as a safeguard that the past will not be erased. With the Jewish Holocaust, for example, photographs have become so central to the process of remembering—not necessarily private, but certainly collective, and ironically, we often rely, as with the Khmer Rouge, on the photographs taken by the murderers. 

Patrick Demarchelier
[Photographer, b. 1943, Le Havre, France, lives in New York.]

 Fashion is the opposite of the real, its worst enemy. Fashion photography is subversive; it makes you believe everything is true, whereas this could not be more false. It is the opposite of a mirror, a deformation. 

Rineke Dijkstra
[Photographer, b. 1959, Sittard, The Netherlands, lives in Amsterdam.]

 For me, the importance of photography is that you can point to something, that you can let other people see things. Ultimately, it is a matter of the specialness of the ordinary. 

Tacita Dean
[Artist, b. 1960, Canterbury, England, lives in Berlin.]

 I want people to feel drenched in time. 

Denis Donoghue
[Critic, b. 1928, Tullow, County Carlow, Ireland, lives in New York.]

 The camera has an interest in turning history into spectacle, but none in reversing the process. At best, the picture leaves a vague blur in the observer’s mind; strong enough to send him into battle perhaps, but not to have him understand why he is going.