Alexandre Dumas
[Writer, b. 1802, Villers-Cotterêts, France, d. 1870, Puys, France.]

 I may mention here, again, the horror I have already expressed elsewhere, á propos of a portrait of myself, which one of the journals have published; I may also add, that I have a horror of photography, and that this horror extends itself to all photographers. (1866) 

Isak Dinesen (Karen Blixen)
[Writer, b. 1885, Rungsted, Denmark, d. 1962, Rungsted, Denmark.]

 I do not see eye to eye with the camera. 

Frank Deford
[Writer, b. 1938, Baltimore, Maryland, d. 2017, Key West, Florida.]

 She glances at the photo, and the pilot light of memory flickers in her eyes. 

James Dean
[Actor, b. 1931, Marion, Indiana, d. 1955, Cholame, California.]

 Can’t you see? I’m Michelangelo’s David. (Explaining his pose to photographer Roy Schatt.) 

Barbara DeGenevieve
[Photographer, artist, and curator, b. 1947, d. 2014, Chicago, Illinois.]

 As an academic I feel I should intellectualize and theoretically analyze when all I really want to do is let the work take me somewhere, manipulate me, and then rough me up a bit. When it comes right down to it, I only want to spend time with work that makes me think and teaches me something while making my body react. 

The Dalai Lama (Lhamo Dhondrub)
[Spiritual leader, b. 1935, Taktser, Tibet, lives in exile.]

 I know the earth is round by relying on the words of someone who has seen it and proved it with photographs... You have to rely on a person who has already had this kind of experience and has no reason to tell lies. (Explaining the Buddhist concept of extremely hidden phenomena.) 

Patrick Demarchelier
[Photographer, b. 1943, Le Havre, France, lives in New York.]

 Fashion is the opposite of the real, its worst enemy. Fashion photography is subversive; it makes you believe everything is true, whereas this could not be more false. It is the opposite of a mirror, a deformation. 

Brian Duffy
[Photographer, b. 1933, London, d. 2010, London.]

 Photography was dead by 1972. Everything had been resolved between 1839 and 1972. Every picture after ‘72, I have seen pre-‘72. Nothing new. But it took me some time to detect its death. The first person who twigged was Henri Cartier-Bresson. He just stopped—and started painting and drawing. God, he was useless.