August Sander
[Photographer, b. 1876, Herdorf, Germany, d. 1964, Cologne.]

 I never made a person look bad. They do that themselves. The portrait is your mirror. 

Ed Ruscha
[Artist, b. 1937, Omaha, Nebraska, lives in Los Angeles.]

 My pictures are not that interesting, nor the subject matter. They are simply a collection of “facts;” my book is more like a collection of “Ready-mades.” 

Andy Warhol
[Artist, b. 1928, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, d. 1987, New York.]

 All photography is Pop, and all photographers are crazy... they feel guilty since they don’t have to do very much—just push a button. 

Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens)
[Writer, b. 1835, Hannibal, Missouri, d. 1910, Redding, Connecticut.]

 Ten thousand pulpits and ten thousand presses are saying the good word for me all the time… Then that trivial little kodak, that a child can carry in its pocket, gets up, uttering never a word, and knocks them dumb! 

Larry Burrows
[Photographer, b. 1926, London, d. 1971, Laos.]

 I am very happy with the equipment I have. All I need is time and patience to use it to the fullest degree, plus God on my side to help with the lighting problems—to move the sun and the moon and the stars to the positions of my choice. 

Garry Winogrand
[Photographer, b. 1928, New York, d. 1984, Tijuana, Mexico.]

 Photography is not about the thing photographed. It is about how that thing looks photographed. 

Victor Burgin
[Artist and writer, b. 1941, Sheffield, England, lives in London.]

 Counter to the nineteenth-century aesthetics which still dominates most teaching of photography, and most writings on photography, work in semiotics has shown that a photograph is not to be reduced to ‘pure form’, nor ‘window on the world’, nor is it a gangway to the presence of an author. A fact of primary social importance is that the photograph is a place of work, a structured and structuring space within which the reader deploys, and is deployed by, what codes he or she is familiar with in order to make sense. 

Franz Kafka
[Writer, b. 1883, Prague, d. 1924, Prague.]

 We photograph things in order to drive them out of our minds.