Lewis Baltz
[Photographer, b. 1945, Newport Beach, California, d. 2014, Paris.]

 I believed it was necessary to investigate photography, dismantle it, jettison all the non-essential components, and begin again with a stripped down but more powerful idea of what is, or could be “photographic.” 

Roberta McGrath
[Critic, lives in Edinburgh, Scotland.]

 In his Day Books [Edward Weston] records how photographic sessions were frequently interrupted. The eye was replaced by the penis, making a photograph by making love. It is here we begin to see an oscillation between photography/sex, (between the print/the real). 

Jean Baudrillard
[Writer and theorist, b. 1929, Reims, France, d. 2007, Paris.]

 Photography is our exorcism. Primitive society had its masks, bourgeois society its mirrors. We have our images. 

Ed Ruscha
[Artist, b. 1937, Omaha, Nebraska, lives in Los Angeles.]

 I believe in intuition and approaching things as instant gratification. Just do the things you want to do, make the kind of pictures you want to make. 

William J. T. Mitchell
[Writer, theorist, and architect, b. 1944, Melbourne, Australia, lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 The myth of digital photography has things exactly upside down. Instead of making photography less credible, less legitimate, digitization has produced a general “optimization” of photographic culture, one in which better and better simulations of the best effects of realism and informational richness in traditional photography have become possible. 

Werner Herzog
[Filmmaker, b. 1942, Sachrang, Germany, lives in Munich and Los Angeles.]

 We are surrounded by worn-out, banal, useless and exhausted images, limping and dragging themselves behind the rest of our cultural evolution. 

Aaron Siskind
[Photographer, b. 1903, New York, d. 1991, Providence, Rhode Island.]

 I want to bring my pictures to the ideal of music. Like music, it means everything, it says everything, but it is objective. 

Susie Linfield
[Writer and critic, New York, lives in New York.]

 Every image of barbarism—of immiseration, humiliation, terror, extermination—embraces its opposite, though sometimes unknowingly. Every image of suffering says not only, “This is so,” but also, by implication: “This must stop.”