Idris Khan
[Artist, b. 1978, Birmingham, England, lives in London.]

 Recently, I can’t seem to take a straight photograph without thinking that what I am photographing won’t be the final image—like the world in front of me is not good enough or something. 

Paul Gauguin
[Artist, b. 1848, Paris, d. 1903, Hiva Oa, Marquesas Islands.]

 Machines have come, art has fled, and I am far from thinking photography can help us. 

Alan Trachtenberg
[Writer and critic, b. b. 1932, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, lives in Hamden, Connecticut.]

 Now we distrust depths, interiors, hidden truths. Meanings lie on surfaces, artifacts of an occasion rather than truths about persons. 

Dorothea Lange
[Photographer, b. 1895, Hoboken, New Jersey, d. 1965, San Francisco.]

 ... it is not a factual photograph per se. The documentary photograph carries with it another thing, a quality in the subject that the artist responds to. It is a photograph which carries the full meaning of the episode or the circumstance or the situation that can only be revealed—because you can’t really recapture it—by this other quality. There is no real warfare between the artist and the documentary photographer. He has to be both. 

Susan Sontag
[Writer, theorist, and critic, b. 1933, New York, d. 2004, New York.]

 The appetite for showing pictures of bodies in pain is as keen, almost, as the desire for ones that show bodies naked. 

Roland Barthes
[Writer, critic, and theorist, b. 1915, Cherbourg, d. 1980, Paris.]

 A sort of umbilical cord links the body of the photographed thing to my gaze: light, though impalpable, is a carnal medium, a skin I share with anyone who has been photographed. 

Minor White
[Photographer, writer, and theorist, b. 1908, Minneapolis, Minnesota, d. 1976, Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 Some of the young photographers today enter photography where I leave off. My “grandchildren” astound me. What I worked for they seem born with. So I wonder where their affirmations of Spirit will lead. (1968) 

Richard Prince
[Artist, b. 1949, Panama Canal Zone, lives in New York.]

 Advertising images aren’t associated with an author. It’s as if their presence were complete—classical in fact. They are too good to be true. They look like they have no history to them—like they showed up all at once. They look like what art always wants to look like.