Ogden Nash
[Poet and humorist, b. 1902, Rye, New York, d. 1971, Baltimore, Maryland.]

 Some hate broccoli, some hate bacon
I hate having my picture taken.
How can your family claim to love you
And then demand a picture of you? 

Anaïs Nin
[Writer, b. 1903, Neuilly, France, d. 1977, Los Angeles.]

 I will not be just a tourist in the world of images, just watching images passing by which I cannot live in, make love to, possess as permanent sources of joy and ecstasy. 

Nadar (Gaspard-Félix Tournachon)
[Photographer, b. 1820, Paris, d. 1910, Paris.]

 Photography is a marvelous discovery, a science that has attracted the greatest intellects, and art that excites the most astute minds—and one that can be practiced by any imbecile. 

Simon Norfolk
[Photographer, b. 1963, Lagos, Nigeria, lives in Brighton, England.]

 [My] pictures are about memory and forgetfulness. The evidence is dissolving. Bones crumble; human ash returns to soil; teeth, sandals, hair, bullets, axes disperse into atoms and molecules. Footprints in the snow will be erased by the next storm. The evidence of evil, like the evidence of good, obeys the universal laws of entropy. Heat cools, matter disintegrates, memories fade. If we let them. 

James Nachtwey
[Photographer, b. 1948, Syracuse, New York, lives in New York.]

 I used to call myself a war photographer. Now I consider myself as an antiwar photographer. 

Richard Nixon
[Politician, b. 1913, Yorba Linda, California, d. 1994, New York.]

 I’m wondering if that was fixed. (Nixon doubting the veracity of Nick Ut’s photograph of nine-year-old Kim Phuc fleeing the village of Trang Bang, Vietnam after it was napalm bombed in 1972; from the White House tapes.) 

Bea Nettles
[Photographer, b. 1946, Gainesville, Florida, lives in Asheville, North Carolina.]

 I feel that rather than “taking” photographs, I am making them. I freely use any materials to make my images... thread, dust, cloth, plastic, pencil, mirrors, as well as my photographic paper and film. I’m trying to stretch and share the limits of my imagination: that is why and how I continue to work. 

Helmut Newton
[Photographer, b. 1920, Berlin, d. 2004, Los Angeles.]

 Some people’s photography is an art. Not mine. Art is a dirty word in photography. All this fine art crap is killing it already.