Joseph Nicéphore Niépce
[One of the originators of photography, b. 1765, Chalon-sur-Saône, France, d. 1833, Gras, France.]

 The discovery I have made and which I call Heliography, consists in reproducing spontaneously, by the action of light, with gradations of tints from black to white, the images received in the camera obscura. 

Vladimir Nabokov
[Writer, b. 1899, St. Petersburg, Russia, d. 1977, Montreux, Switzerland.]

 All colors made me happy: even gray.
My eyes were such that literally they
Took photographs.  

Shirin Neshat
[Artist, photographer, and filmmaker, b. 1957, Qazvin, Iran, lives in New York.]

 Poets use metaphors and symbolism to construct images. I construct my images in the same way, except that I am using a different form. 

Marilyn Nance
[Photographer and artist, b. 1953, New York, lives in Fort Greene, Brooklyn.]

 Things haven’t really changed for black folks, and we know it. The old folks know it. The middle-aged folks know it. Young folks know it—we all know it. We nod to each other when we see ourselves on the street. (That’s why white folks think all black folks know each other.) We share a secret... that we are human beings, that we love, that we invent, that we brush our teeth, that we vacuum our rugs, that we throw out our junk mail. All of that. We carry in each of us all the stories that are withheld from the history books and kept out of the media, erased from common knowledge. My work deals with the souls of black folks and our quest for social change... I’m being asked to tell my story of how things haven't really changed. 

Nicholas Nixon
[Photographer, b. 1947, Detroit, Michigan, lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.]

 I’m not very good at working for other people. I mostly make pictures because of some whim. With luck, I get a glimpse of something, and then it turns into an adventure, and then into a project. 

Charles Nègre
[Photographer, b. 1820, Grasse, France, d. 1880, Cannes, France.]

 Photography does not form a separate, barren field of art. It is only a means of execution, uniform, rapid and sure, which serves the artist by reproducing with mathematical precision the form and effect of objects and even that poetry which at once arises from any harmonious combination. 

Simon Norfolk
[Photographer, b. 1963, Lagos, Nigeria, lives in Brighton, England.]

 [My] pictures are about memory and forgetfulness. The evidence is dissolving. Bones crumble; human ash returns to soil; teeth, sandals, hair, bullets, axes disperse into atoms and molecules. Footprints in the snow will be erased by the next storm. The evidence of evil, like the evidence of good, obeys the universal laws of entropy. Heat cools, matter disintegrates, memories fade. If we let them. 

Arnold Newman
[Photographer, b. 1918, New York, d. 2006, New York.]

 Those who call themselves art photographers are pompous, arrogant egoists.