Pope John XIII
[Religious leader, b. 1881, Sotto il Monte, Italy, d. 1963, Rome.]

 God knew seventy-seven years ago that someday I would be Pope. Why couldn’t he have made me a little more photogenic? (To photographer Yousef Karsh) 

Carl Jung
[Psychoanalyst and writer, b. 1875, Kessewil, Switzerland, d. 1961, Zurich.]

 ...consciousness can keep only a few images in full clarity at one time, and even this clarity fluctuates. 

Jim Jarmusch
[Film director, b. 1953, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, lives in New York.]

 Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is non-existent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery—celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said: “It’s not where you take things from—it’s where you take them to.” 

James Joyce
[Writer, b. 1882, Rathgar, Ireland, d. 1941, Zurich, Switzerland.]

 He dwelt, being a bit of an artist in his spare time, on the female form in general developmentally because, as it so happened, no later than that afternoon he had seen those Grecian statues, 1450 perfectly developed as works of art, in the National Museum. Marble could give the original, shoulders, back, all the symmetry, all the rest... Whereas no photo could because it simply wasn’t art in a word. 

Jesse Jackson
[Minister and activist, b. 1941, Greenville, South Carolina, lives in Chicago.]

 Pictures can live in one’s memory. That’s why they are important. 

Bill Jay
[Photographer, writer, and curator, b. 1940, Maidenhead, England, d. 2009, Samara, Costa Rica.]

 I start a lot of photo projects but never seem to… 

Estelle Jussim
[Writer and critic, b. 1927, New York, d. 2004, Holyoke, Massachusetts.]

 A photograph is as much an act of interpretation as it is an artifact. 

Lotte Jacobi
[Photographer, b. 1896, Thorn, West Prussia, (now Torun, Poland), d. 1990, Concord, New Hampshire.]

 I was to be a photographer and that was that. It did everything for me. I love people. I needed the camera more than ever I would have believed.