Roland Barthes
[Writer, critic, and theorist, b. 1915, Cherbourg, d. 1980, Paris.]

 How does meaning get into the image? Where does it end? And if it ends, what is there beyond? 

Stephen Shore
[Photographer, b. 1947, New York, lives in New York.]

 Even in ordinary reproduction [photography] verges on facsimile. 

Thomas Ruff
[Photographer, b. 1958, Zell, Germany, lives in Dusseldorf, Germany.]

 Photographs are still always depictions, it's just that for my generation the model for the photograph is probably not reality any more, but images we have of that reality. 

Christian Boltanski
[Artist, b. 1944, Paris, lives in Paris.]

 ... in the eyes of its visitors, Venice has no reality of its own. Anyone visiting the place has already seen so many pictures of it that they can only attempt to view it via these clichés, and they take home photographs of Venice that are similar to the ones they already knew. Venice [is] becoming like one of those painted backdrops that photographers use in their studio. 

Anthony Aziz

 ... with the end of truth in photography has come a corresponding loss of trust; every image, every representation, is now a potential fraud. And as the eternal debate rages on about the appearance of truth and truth itself, simulation is the only truth we can trust. 

Gilles Peress
[Photographer, b. 1946, Neuilly, France, lives in New York.]

 There’s a big choice to be made right now. Either you fall on the postmodernist incapacity for dealing with the world, which is that there is no accurate description of the world so there is no point in going out to look at the world. And if you’re not going to look at the world then certainly you’re not going to change it. 

Andy Grundberg
[Critic, curator, and educator, lives in Washington, D.C.]

 [Postmodern photography] implies the exhaustion of the image universe: it suggests that a photographer can find more than enough images already existing in the world without the bother of making new ones. 

Lucy Lippard
[Critic and writer, b. 1936, New York, lives in Galisteo, New Mexico.]

 There is indeed something omnivorous about the act of photography. It offers a way of responding to everything about everything. 
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