Michelangelo Antonioni
[Filmmaker, b. 1912, Ferrara, Italy, d. 2007, Rome.]

 We know that under the revealed image there is another one which is more faithful to reality, and under this one is yet another, and again another under this last one, down to the true image of that absolute, mysterious reality that nobody will ever see. Or perhaps, not until the decomposition of every image, of every reality. 

Anonymous
[lived or lives somewhere.]

 One photo out of focus is a mistake. Ten photos out of focus are an experimentation. One hundred photos out of focus are a style. 

Josef Albers
[Artist, b. 1888, Bottrop, Germany, d. 1976, New Haven, Connecticut.]

 [Photography] has all the advantages and disadvantages of childhood. It is still unafraid of spontaneity and directness. (1943) 

Slim Aarons
[Photographer, b. 1916, New York, d. 2006, Montrose, New York.]

 The only beach I was interested in landing on was one decorated with beautiful seminude girls tanning in a tranquil sun. (On declining a photojournalism offer to cover the Korean War) 

Berenice Abbott
[Photographer, writer, teacher, b. 1898, Springfield, Ohio, d. 1991, Monson, Maine.]

 Let us first say what photography is not. A photograph is not a painting, a poem, a symphony, a dance. It is not just a pretty picture, not an exercise in contortionist techniques and sheer print quality. It is or should be a significant document, a penetrating statement, which can be described in a very simple term—selectivity. 

Ansel Adams
[Photographer, b. 1902, San Francisco, d. 1984, Carmel, California.]

 I expect to retire to a fine-grained heaven where the temperatures are always consistent, where the images slide before ones eyes in a continual cascade of form and meaning. 

Eugène Atget
[Photographer, b. 1857, Paris, France, d. 1927, Paris.]

 Now that I am approaching old age—that is to say, seventy years old—and have neither heir nor successor, I am worried and tormented about the future of this beautiful collection of negatives, which could fall into hands unaware of its import and ultimately disappear, without benefiting anyone. (1920) 

William Albert Allard
[Photojournalist, b. 1937, Minneapolis, Minnesota, lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.]

 I think the best pictures are often on the edges of any situation, I don’t find photographing the situation nearly as interesting as photographing the edges.