Lawrence Alloway
[Writer, curator, and critic, b. 1927, London, d. 1990, New York.]

 If “a print is the widow of the stone,” to quote Robert Rauschenberg, then a photograph is the twin of an event. 

Edward Abbey
[Writer and Environmental Activist, b. 1927, Indiana, Pennsylvania, United States, d. 1989, Tucson, Arizona, United States.]

 Our job is to record, each in his own way, this world of light and shadow and time that will never come again exactly as it is today. 

Abbas (Abbas Attar)
[Photographer, b. 1944, Iran, lives in Paris.]

 I know that some photographers have big egos, but photography is simple. In the morning, you put a roll of film in your camera—and today you don’t even have to do this with digital. You take to the streets, you come back home, edit your photographs and show them. It’s that simple. 

Sam Abell
[Photographer, b. 1945, Sylvania, Ohio, lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.]

 Photography, alone of the arts, seems perfected to serve the desire humans have for a moment—this very moment—to stay. 

Robert Adams
[Photographer and writer, b. 1937, Orange, New Jersey, lives in Astoria, Oregon.]

 Pictures should look like they were easily taken. 

William Albert Allard
[Photojournalist, b. 1937, Minneapolis, Minnesota, lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.]

 I think the best pictures are often on the edges of any situation, I don’t find photographing the situation nearly as interesting as photographing the edges. 

Carl Andre
[Sculptor and writer, b. 1935, Quincy, Massachusetts, lives in New York.]

 I’m afraid we get a great deal of our exposure to art through magazines and through slides and I think this is dreadful, this is anti-art because art is direct experience with something in the world and photography is just a rumor, a kind of pornography of art. 

Richard Avedon
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 2004, San Antonio, Texas.]

 If each photograph steals a bit of the soul, isn’t it possible that I give up pieces of mine every time I take a picture?