Anna Atkins
[Photographer, b. 1799, Tunbridge, Kent, England, d. 1871, Halstead, Essex, England.]

 The difficulty of making accurate drawings of objects so minute as many of the Algae and Confervae has induced me to avail myself of Sir John Herschel’s beautiful process of Cyanotype, to obtain impressions of the plants themselves, which I have much pleasure in offering to my botanical friends. (1843, text accompanying the first photographically illustrated book, British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions, authored by the Atkins, recognized as the first female photographer.) 

Brooks Atkinson
[Writer and critic, b. 1894, Melrose, Massachusetts, d. 1984, New York.]

 The virtue of the camera is not the power it has to transform the photographer into an artist, but the impulse it gives him to keep on looking. 

Berenice Abbott
[Photographer, writer, teacher, b. 1898, Springfield, Ohio, d. 1991, Monson, Maine.]

 Let us first say what photography is not. A photograph is not a painting, a poem, a symphony, a dance. It is not just a pretty picture, not an exercise in contortionist techniques and sheer print quality. It is or should be a significant document, a penetrating statement, which can be described in a very simple term—selectivity. 

William Albert Allard
[Photojournalist, b. 1937, Minneapolis, Minnesota, lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.]

 I think the best pictures are often on the edges of any situation, I don’t find photographing the situation nearly as interesting as photographing the edges. 

Shimon Attie
[Photographer, b. 1957, Los Angeles, lives in New York.]

 I use contemporary media to reanimate sites and places with images of their own lost histories. 

Richard Avedon
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 2004, San Antonio, Texas.]

 A photographic portrait is a picture of someone who knows he’s being photographed, and what he does with this knowledge is as much a part of the photograph as what he’s wearing or how he looks. 

Pamela Anderson
[Actress and model, b. 1967, Ladysmith, British Columbia, Canada, lives in Los Angeles.]

 I like the experience of being in a shoot, and I’m a total exhibitionist, but I don’t like to look at them. 

Amy Arbus
[Photographer, b. 1954, New York, lives in New York.]

 It’s entirely ridiculous and hopeless to try to compete with somebody who made such a huge contribution to photography... I knew when I went into photography that I would be compared to my mother. I thought to myself, what can I do about that?