Eve Arnold
[Photographer, b. 1913, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, d. 2011, London.]

 I didn’t want to be a “woman photographer.” That would limit me. I wanted to be a photographer who was a woman, with all the world open to my camera. 

Anthony Aziz

 ... with the end of truth in photography has come a corresponding loss of trust; every image, every representation, is now a potential fraud. And as the eternal debate rages on about the appearance of truth and truth itself, simulation is the only truth we can trust. 

Anonymous
[lived or lives somewhere.]

 One photo out of focus is a mistake. Ten photos out of focus are an experimentation. One hundred photos out of focus are a style. 

Rosanna Arquette
[Actress, b. 1959, New York, lives in Hollywood.]

 I was in Florida with Bert Stern, the photographer who shot Marilyn Monroe on the beach with a sweater, and we smoked a joint. The bathing suit kept coming off in the water, and I just ripped it off. 

Cory Arcangel
[Artist, b. 1978, Buffalo, New York, lives in New York.]

 I would love to say there was some contemporary artist who’s work really got me thinking, but lately I have just been trying to sort out 20 years of garbage TV culture that is filling my brain. 

Louis Aragon
[Artist, poet, and writer, b. 1897, Neuilly, France, d. 1982, Paris.]

 As we know, cubism was a reaction on the part of painters to the invention of photography. Photography and cinema made struggling for exact likeness childish. (1935) 

Eleanor Antin
[Artist, b. 1935, New York, lives in San Diego, California.]

 I adore [photography’s] uneasy mix of fact and fiction—its dubious claim to truth—its status as history. 

Berenice Abbott
[Photographer, writer, teacher, b. 1898, Springfield, Ohio, d. 1991, Monson, Maine.]

 Let us first say what photography is not. A photograph is not a painting, a poem, a symphony, a dance. It is not just a pretty picture, not an exercise in contortionist techniques and sheer print quality. It is or should be a significant document, a penetrating statement, which can be described in a very simple term—selectivity.