Lee Friedlander
[Photographer, b. 1934, Aberdeen, Washington, lives in New York.]

 With a camera like that [a Leica 35mm rangefinder] you don’t believe you’re in the masterpiece business. It’s enough to be able to peck at the world. 

Giséle Freund
[Photographer, b. 1908, Berlin, Germany, d. 2000, Paris, France.]

 Before the first press pictures, the ordinary man would visualize only those events that took place near him, on his street or in his village. Photography opened a window. As the reader’s outlook expanded, the world began to shrink. 

Anne Frank
[Writer, b. 1929, Frankfurt, Germany, d. 1945, Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, Germany.]

 This is a photo as I would wish myself to look all the time. Then I would maybe have a chance to come to Hollywood. (10, October, 1942; Handwritten inscription on a photograph) 

Athol Fugard
[Playright, b. 1932, Middelburg, South Africa, lives in San Diego, California and South Africa.]

 You call that work? Click-click with a camera. Are you mad? 

Sigmund Freud
[Neurologist, psychoanalyst, and thinker, b. 1856, Freiberg, Moravia, Austrian Empire (now Príbor, Czechoslovakia), d. 1939, London, England.]

 We should picture the instrument that carries our mental functioning as resembling a compound microscope or photographic apparatus. 

E.M. Forster
[Writer, b. 1879, London, d. 1970, Coventry, England.]

 Even a fellow with a camera has his favourite subjects, as we can see looking through the Kodak-albums of our friends. One amateur prefers the family group, another bathing scenes, another cows upon an alp, or kittens held upside down in the arms of a black-faced child. The tendency to choose one subject rather than another indicates the photographer’s temperament. Nevertheless, his passion is for photography rather than for selection, a kitten will serve when no cows are available... 

Gustave Flaubert
[Writer, b. 1821, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France, d. 1880, Rouen, France.]

 PHOTOGRAPHY Will make painting obsolete. (See DAGUERREOTYPE.) (From “The Dictionary of Received Ideas,” assembled from notes Flaubert made in the 1870s.) 

Harold Feinstein
[Photographer, b. 1931, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 On one hand you want to see your subject well. On the other hand, you want to be caught off guard to retain the spontaneity. If you know your subject too well you stop seeing it.