Athol Fugard
[Playright, b. 1932, Middelburg, South Africa, lives in San Diego, California and South Africa.]

 You call that work? Click-click with a camera. Are you mad? 

John Paul Filo
[Photographer, b. 1948, Natrona Heights, Pennsylvania, lives in New York.]

 I didn’t react visually. This girl came up and knelt over the body and let out a God-awful scream that made me click the camera. (On photographing Mary Vecchio with slain student Jeffery Miller during the shootings of students at Kent State, April, 1970.) 

Francis Frith
[Photographer, b. 1822, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England, d. 1898, Cannes, France.]

 Every stone, every little perfection, or dilapidation, the most minute detail, which, on an ordinary drawing, would merit no special attention, becomes, on a photograph, worthy of careful study. 

Lee Friedlander
[Photographer, b. 1934, Aberdeen, Washington, lives in New York.]

 I only wanted Uncle Vern standing by his new car (a Hudson) on a clear day. I got him and the car. I also got a bit of Aunt Mary’s laundry and Beau Jack, the dog, peeing on a fence, and a row of potted tuberous begonias on the porch and seventy-eight trees and a million pebbles in the driveway and more. It’s a generous medium, photography. 

Joan Fontcuberta
[Photographer, b. 1955, Barcelona, lives in Barcelona.]

 I have always thought that the photographer does artistic work and that art consists of working with fictional premises. 

Adam Fuss
[Photographer, b. 1961, London, lives in New York.]

 An echo is a good way to describe the photogram, which is a visual echo of the real object. That's why I like to work with the photogram, because the contact with what is represented is actual. It's as if the border between the world and the print is osmotic. 

William Faulkner
[Writer, b. 1897, New Albany, Mississippi, d. 1962, Oxford, Mississippi.]

 No photographs, no recorded documents. (His vow to keep his “refuse” out of history) 

Nancy Foote
[Writer and Critic, lives in America.]

 Ironically, a medium which started out as an image recorder and replicator came to look on itself as a producer of sacred objects. But the strength of photographs lies in their unique ability to gather, preserve and present outside information, not to “make art.”