Larry Fink
[Photographer, b. 1941, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Martins Creek, Pennsylvania.]

 [Photography is] the idea of the transformative merger between you and the person you are seeing, that you somehow try to enter their form, their skin, their mass, their muscle, and potentially, possibly, their soul. 

Adam Fuss
[Photographer, b. 1961, London, lives in New York.]

 An echo is a good way to describe the photogram, which is a visual echo of the real object. That's why I like to work with the photogram, because the contact with what is represented is actual. It's as if the border between the world and the print is osmotic. 

Michel Foucault
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1926, Poitiers, France, d. 1984, Paris, France.]

 Our society is not one of spectacle but of surveillance. 

William Faulkner
[Writer, b. 1897, New Albany, Mississippi, d. 1962, Oxford, Mississippi.]

 No photographs, no recorded documents. (His vow to keep his “refuse” out of history) 

E.M. Forster
[Writer, b. 1879, London, d. 1970, Coventry, England.]

 Even a fellow with a camera has his favourite subjects, as we can see looking through the Kodak-albums of our friends. One amateur prefers the family group, another bathing scenes, another cows upon an alp, or kittens held upside down in the arms of a black-faced child. The tendency to choose one subject rather than another indicates the photographer’s temperament. Nevertheless, his passion is for photography rather than for selection, a kitten will serve when no cows are available... 

Martine Franck
[Photographer, b. 1938, Antwerp, Belgium, d. 2012, Paris.]

 My grandfather killed himself falling off the dike in Ostend while photographing my two cousins. This can happen so easily when looking through a lens: for a split second nothing else exists outside the frame. 

Nancy Foote
[Writer and Critic, lives in America.]

 For every photographer who clamors to make it as an artist, there is an artist running a grave risk of turning into a photographer. (1976) 

Federico Fellini
[Filmmaker, b. 1920, Rimini, Italy, d. 1993, Rome.]

 There is no such thing as a good paparazzo. A good paparazzo, that’s a paparazzo who has had his camera broken. In fact, they are bandits, thieves of photography. (Statement after photographs were published showing Jackie Onassis sunbathing nude.)