Leonard Freed
[Photographer, b. 1929, Brooklyn, New York, d. 2006, Garrison, New York.]

 Photographing is an emotional thing, a graceful thing. Photography allows me to wander with a purpose. 

Athol Fugard
[Playright, b. 1932, Middelburg, South Africa, lives in San Diego, California and South Africa.]

 You call that work? Click-click with a camera. Are you mad? 

Nancy Foote
[Writer and Critic, lives in America.]

 Ironically, a medium which started out as an image recorder and replicator came to look on itself as a producer of sacred objects. But the strength of photographs lies in their unique ability to gather, preserve and present outside information, not to “make art.” 

Horst Faas
[Photojournalist, b. 1933, Berlin, Germany, d. 2012, Munich, Germany.]

 I think the best war photos I have taken have always been made when a battle was actually taking place—when people were confused and scared and courageous and stupid and showed all these things. When you look at people right at the very moment of truth, everything is quite human. You take a picture at this moment with all the mistakes in it, with everything that might be confusing to the reader, but that’s the right combat photo. 

William Faulkner
[Writer, b. 1897, New Albany, Mississippi, d. 1962, Oxford, Mississippi.]

 No photographs, no recorded documents. (His vow to keep his “refuse” out of history) 

Gustave Flaubert
[Writer, b. 1821, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France, d. 1880, Rouen, France.]

 PHOTOGRAPHY Will make painting obsolete. (See DAGUERREOTYPE.) (From “The Dictionary of Received Ideas,” assembled from notes Flaubert made in the 1870s.) 

Harold Feinstein
[Photographer, b. 1931, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 On one hand you want to see your subject well. On the other hand, you want to be caught off guard to retain the spontaneity. If you know your subject too well you stop seeing it. 

Sigmund Freud
[Neurologist, psychoanalyst, and thinker, b. 1856, Freiberg, Moravia, Austrian Empire (now Príbor, Czechoslovakia), d. 1939, London, England.]

 [The child receives impressions like] a photographic exposure that can be developed after any interval of time and transformed into a picture.