Giséle Freund
[Photographer, b. 1908, Berlin, Germany, d. 2000, Paris, France.]

 The lens, that allegedly impartial eye, permits all possible distortions of reality... The importance of photography lies not only in the fact that it is a creation, but above all in the fact that it is one of the most effective means of shaping our ideas and influencing our behavior. 

Jason Fulford
[Photographer, b. 1973, Atlanta, Georgia, lives in Scranton, Pennsylvania.]

 We all are influenced by things and copy things, but often where there is a certain level of copying, only the surface value ends up being reproduced and that becomes thinner and thinner. I feel like a lot of appropriation suffers from that. 

Robbert Flick
[Photographer, b. 1939, Amersfoort, Holland, lives in Los Angeles, California.]

 Serendipity plays an enormous role in my work. I create the possibilities for accidents to happen. 

Judy Fiskin
[Photographer, b. 1945, Chicago, lives in Los Angeles.]

 In my work, the information is the least important part. It’s there, and the work wouldn’t mean the same thing without it, but it isn’t structured around the information. The most interesting part to me is the visual play... looking at this little universe of representation that I can make out of the world. 

Sigmund Freud
[Neurologist, psychoanalyst, and thinker, b. 1856, Freiberg, Moravia, Austrian Empire (now Príbor, Czechoslovakia), d. 1939, London, England.]

 We should picture the instrument that carries our mental functioning as resembling a compound microscope or photographic apparatus. 

Adam Fuss
[Photographer, b. 1961, London, lives in New York.]

 An echo is a good way to describe the photogram, which is a visual echo of the real object. That's why I like to work with the photogram, because the contact with what is represented is actual. It's as if the border between the world and the print is osmotic. 

Andreas Feininger
[Photographer, b. 1906, Paris, France, d. 1999, New York.]

 Experience has shown that the more fascinating the subject, the less observant the photographer. 

Harold Feinstein
[Photographer, b. 1931, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 On one hand you want to see your subject well. On the other hand, you want to be caught off guard to retain the spontaneity. If you know your subject too well you stop seeing it.