Andreas Feininger
[Photographer, b. 1906, Paris, France, d. 1999, New York.]

 Experience has shown that the more fascinating the subject, the less observant the photographer. 

William Faulkner
[Writer, b. 1897, New Albany, Mississippi, d. 1962, Oxford, Mississippi.]

 No photographs, no recorded documents. (His vow to keep his “refuse” out of history) 

Giséle Freund
[Photographer, b. 1908, Berlin, Germany, d. 2000, Paris, France.]

 Before the first press pictures, the ordinary man would visualize only those events that took place near him, on his street or in his village. Photography opened a window. As the reader’s outlook expanded, the world began to shrink. 

Michel Foucault
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1926, Poitiers, France, d. 1984, Paris, France.]

 Our society is not one of spectacle but of surveillance. 

Federico Fellini
[Filmmaker, b. 1920, Rimini, Italy, d. 1993, Rome.]

 There is no such thing as a good paparazzo. A good paparazzo, that’s a paparazzo who has had his camera broken. In fact, they are bandits, thieves of photography. (Statement after photographs were published showing Jackie Onassis sunbathing nude.) 

E.M. Forster
[Writer, b. 1879, London, d. 1970, Coventry, England.]

 Even a fellow with a camera has his favourite subjects, as we can see looking through the Kodak-albums of our friends. One amateur prefers the family group, another bathing scenes, another cows upon an alp, or kittens held upside down in the arms of a black-faced child. The tendency to choose one subject rather than another indicates the photographer’s temperament. Nevertheless, his passion is for photography rather than for selection, a kitten will serve when no cows are available... 

Robert Frank
[Photographer and filmmaker, b. 1924, Zürich, Switzerland, lives in Mabou, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada, and New York.]

 It’s not the decisive moment. It’s not the beginning or end. It’s the middle. It’s more like a question. 

Nancy Foote
[Writer and Critic, lives in America.]

 Ironically, a medium which started out as an image recorder and replicator came to look on itself as a producer of sacred objects. But the strength of photographs lies in their unique ability to gather, preserve and present outside information, not to “make art.”