Anne Frank
[Writer, b. 1929, Frankfurt, Germany, d. 1945, Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, Germany.]

 This is a photo as I would wish myself to look all the time. Then I would maybe have a chance to come to Hollywood. (10, October, 1942; Handwritten inscription on a photograph) 

Adam Fuss
[Photographer, b. 1961, London, lives in New York.]

 An echo is a good way to describe the photogram, which is a visual echo of the real object. That's why I like to work with the photogram, because the contact with what is represented is actual. It's as if the border between the world and the print is osmotic. 

John Paul Filo
[Photographer, b. 1948, Natrona Heights, Pennsylvania, lives in New York.]

 I didn’t react visually. This girl came up and knelt over the body and let out a God-awful scream that made me click the camera. (On photographing Mary Vecchio with slain student Jeffery Miller during the shootings of students at Kent State, April, 1970.) 

Giséle Freund
[Photographer, b. 1908, Berlin, Germany, d. 2000, Paris, France.]

 Before the first press pictures, the ordinary man would visualize only those events that took place near him, on his street or in his village. Photography opened a window. As the reader’s outlook expanded, the world began to shrink. 

Martine Franck
[Photographer, b. 1938, Antwerp, Belgium, d. 2012, Paris.]

 My grandfather killed himself falling off the dike in Ostend while photographing my two cousins. This can happen so easily when looking through a lens: for a split second nothing else exists outside the frame. 

Harold Feinstein
[Photographer, b. 1931, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 On one hand you want to see your subject well. On the other hand, you want to be caught off guard to retain the spontaneity. If you know your subject too well you stop seeing it. 

Gustave Flaubert
[Writer, b. 1821, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France, d. 1880, Rouen, France.]

 PHOTOGRAPHY Will make painting obsolete. (See DAGUERREOTYPE.) (From “The Dictionary of Received Ideas,” assembled from notes Flaubert made in the 1870s.) 

Francis Frith
[Photographer, b. 1822, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England, d. 1898, Cannes, France.]

 Every stone, every little perfection, or dilapidation, the most minute detail, which, on an ordinary drawing, would merit no special attention, becomes, on a photograph, worthy of careful study.