H.G. Wells
[Writer, b. 1866, Bromley, Kent, England, d. 1946, London.]

 Mind you, I am not one of those who would prohibit a man wearing what he conceives to be his best clothes to the photographer’s. I like to see the little vanity peeping out—the last minute’s folly of a foolish tie, nailed up for a lifetime. (1893) 

Carrie Mae Weems
[Artist, b. 1953, Portland, Oregon, lives in Syracuse, New York.]

 I got my first camera when I was 21—my boyfriend gave it to me for my birthday. But at that point politics was my life, and I viewed the camera as a tool for expressing my political beliefs rather than as an art medium. 

Edward Weston
[Photographer, b. 1886, Highland Park, Illinois, d. 1958, Wildcat Hill, California.]

 My work is never intellectual. I never make a negative unless emotionally moved by my subject. 

Alex Webb
[Photographer, b. 1952, San Francisco, lives in Brooklyn, New York.]

 ... the possibility of one particular photographer’s pictures lying around the corner is never realized until the photographer is there. It’s one of the enigmas of photography. 

James McNeill Whistler
[Artist, b. 1834, Lowell, Massachusetts, d. 1903, London.]

 The imitator is a poor kind of creature. If the man who paints only the face, or flower, or other surface he sees before him were an artist, the king of artists would be the photographer. 

Marion Post Wolcott
[Photographer, b. 1910, Bloomfield, New Jersey, d. 1990, Santa Barbara, California.]

 Women are tough, supportive, sensitive, intelligent, and creative. They are survivors. Women have come a long way, but not far enough. Ahead still are formidable hurdles. Speak with your images from your heart and soul. Give of yourselves. Trust your gut reactions. Suck out the juices—the essence of your life experiences. Get on with it. It may not be too late. 

Peter Wollen
[Writer, theorist, filmmaker, b. 1938, London, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The aesthetic discussion of photography is dominated by the concept of time. Photographs appear as devices stopping time and preserving fragments of the past, like flies in amber. 

Andy Warhol
[Artist, b. 1928, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, d. 1987, New York.]

 All photography is Pop, and all photographers are crazy... they feel guilty since they don’t have to do very much—just push a button.