Clarence H. White
[Photographer, b. 1871, West Carlisle, Ohio, d. 1925, Mexico City.]

 I think the greatest weakness of the young worker is the lack of something to express. He is too much interested in the photograph for the sake of the photograph alone—that is, in the medium or in the taking of the photograph itself. The photograph should express something. 

David Foster Wallace
[Writer, b. 1962, Ithica, New York, d. 2008, Claremont, California.]

 You suffer with the stunted desire caused by one of its oldest lies. Do not believe the photographs. Fame is not the exit from any cage. 

Frederick Wiseman
[Filmmaker and Documentarian, b. 1930, Boston, Massachusetts, lives in Boston.]

 The effort to see and really to represent is no idle business in face of the constant force that makes for muddlement. The great thing is indeed that the muddled state too is one of the very sharpest of the realities, that it also has color and form and character, has often in fact a broad and rich comicality. 

Tom Waits
[Musician, b. 1949, Pomona, California, lives in Sonoma County, California.]

 Photos are profound because they have such short lives. They are more like fingerprints, dead leaves, rain puddles, or the corpses of flies. 

Jeff Wall
[Photographer, b. 1946, Vancouver, Canada, lives in Vancouver.]

 One paradox I have found is that, the more you use computers in picture-making, the more “hand-made” the picture becomes. Oddly, then, digital technology is leading, in my work at least, toward a greater reliance on handmaking because the assembly and montage of the various parts of the picture is done very carefully by hand. 

Art Wolfe
[Photographer, b. 1951, Seattle, Washington, lives in Seattle.]

 For me making a digital photo is like making a watercolor... It’s not a painting, and it’s not a photo. It’s something altogether new. 

Jamie Wyeth
[Artist, b. 1946, Wilmington, Delaware, lives in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania.]

 When painting portraits a lot of people say, “Why not get a photograph of the person?” Photography is wonderful and it is an art form in itself, but... my portrait is a culmination of elements... a truer image of a person than just the ‘click’ of a snapshot. 

Edward Weston
[Photographer, b. 1886, Highland Park, Illinois, d. 1958, Wildcat Hill, California.]

 My own eyes are no more than scouts on a preliminary search, for the camera’s eye may entirely change my idea.