Andy Warhol
[Artist, b. 1928, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, d. 1987, New York.]

 My idea of a good picture is one that’s in focus and of a famous person. 

Henry Wessel
[Photographer, b. 1942, Teaneck, New Jersey, lives in San Francisco.]

 You’re suddenly seeing the coherence and the interconnectedness of everything, left to right, top to bottom, front to back. It’s all connected, and, somehow, it’s all in balance. And that’s, of course, when you go, “Yes!” 

Tom Waits
[Musician, b. 1949, Pomona, California, lives in Sonoma County, California.]

 Photos are profound because they have such short lives. They are more like fingerprints, dead leaves, rain puddles, or the corpses of flies. 

Minor White
[Photographer, writer, and theorist, b. 1908, Minneapolis, Minnesota, d. 1976, Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 One should photograph objects, not only for what they are but for what else they are. 

William Carlos Williams
[Writer and poet, b. 1883, Rutherford, New Jersey, d. 1963, Rutherford.]

 No ideas but in things. 

David Wojnarowicz
[Artist and activist, b. 1954, Redbank, New Jersey, d. 1990, New York.]

 I am all emptiness and futility. I am an empty stranger, a carbon copy of my form. I can no longer find what I’m looking for outside of myself. It doesn’t exist out there. Maybe it’s only in here, inside my head. But my head is glass and my eyes have stopped being cameras, the tape has run out and nobody’s words can touch me. 

Clarence H. White
[Photographer, b. 1871, West Carlisle, Ohio, d. 1925, Mexico City.]

 I think the greatest weakness of the young worker is the lack of something to express. He is too much interested in the photograph for the sake of the photograph alone—that is, in the medium or in the taking of the photograph itself. The photograph should express something. 

H.G. Wells
[Writer, b. 1866, Bromley, Kent, England, d. 1946, London.]

 Mind you, I am not one of those who would prohibit a man wearing what he conceives to be his best clothes to the photographer’s. I like to see the little vanity peeping out—the last minute’s folly of a foolish tie, nailed up for a lifetime. (1893)