Clarence H. White
[Photographer, b. 1871, West Carlisle, Ohio, d. 1925, Mexico City.]

 I think the greatest weakness of the young worker is the lack of something to express. He is too much interested in the photograph for the sake of the photograph alone—that is, in the medium or in the taking of the photograph itself. The photograph should express something. 

Ludwig Wittgenstein
[Philosopher, b. 1889, Vienna, Austria, d. 1951, Cambridge, England.]

 A picture held us captive. And we could not get outside it, for it lay in our language and language seemed to repeat itself to us inexorably. 

Todd Walker
[Photographer, b. 1917, Salt Lake City, Utah, d. 1998, Tucson, Arizona.]

 I wonder what art is about and I’m not sure that what I do is art because I’m a photographer, not an artist. But whatever you do, the secret is to do what you think you ought to do, and do the hell out of it. 

H.G. Wells
[Writer, b. 1866, Bromley, Kent, England, d. 1946, London.]

 I often think we do not take this business of photography in a sufficiently serious spirit. Issuing a photograph is like marriage: you can only undo the mischief with infinite woe... 

John Waters
[Filmmaker and photographer, b. 1946, Baltimore, Maryland, lives in Baltimore.]

 My photographs are not really about photography. They are about editing. I use photography but they are all taken from the TV screen. Anybody can do that, but it's the order I put the pictures in to try to create a new kind of movie, something that you can put on your wall. 

David Foster Wallace
[Writer, b. 1962, Ithica, New York, d. 2008, Claremont, California.]

 You suffer with the stunted desire caused by one of its oldest lies. Do not believe the photographs. Fame is not the exit from any cage. 

Jack Welpott
[Photographer, b. 1923, Kansas City, Missouri, d. 2007, Greenbrae, California.]

 I am still struck by the power of photography to strip away the bark of the mind and reveal the visceral workings underneath. 

Peter Wollen
[Writer, theorist, filmmaker, b. 1938, London, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The aesthetic discussion of photography is dominated by the concept of time. Photographs appear as devices stopping time and preserving fragments of the past, like flies in amber.