Tom Wolfe
[Writer, b. 1930, Richmond, Virginia, d. 2018, New York.]

 It was the unspoken curse of the medium, which went: “Photography is not really creative.” Naturally no painter would be so gauche as to say publicly that photography was not an art form. Nevertheless, there was an unuttered axiom: “Painters create, photographers select.” Not all the enlightened lip service in the world could change that feeling. The condescension with which the most insignificant painter could look down upon an Ansel Adams, a Steichen, or a Stieglitz was absolutely breathtaking. If sneers gave off heat, Alfred Stieglitz himself would have ended up about the size and shape of a smoked oyster. 

Alex Webb
[Photographer, b. 1952, San Francisco, lives in Brooklyn, New York.]

 ... the possibility of one particular photographer’s pictures lying around the corner is never realized until the photographer is there. It’s one of the enigmas of photography. 

Ai Weiwei
[Artist, b. 1957, Beijing, lives in Beijing.]

 ...photographs are facts, but not necessarily true... The present always surpasses the past, and the future will not care about today. 

Ludwig Wittgenstein
[Philosopher, b. 1889, Vienna, Austria, d. 1951, Cambridge, England.]

 A picture held us captive. And we could not get outside it, for it lay in our language and language seemed to repeat itself to us inexorably. 

Francis Wey
[Writer, member de la Société héliographique, b. 1812, Switzerland, d. 1882, Paris.]

 [Photography] is the seed of a revolution against the system of stencillers, to the benefit of reality... it would seem already that the public, more desirous of the truth, is growing less demanding in terms of preconceived ideas of style and beauty, and displaying curiosity toward the cult of the real. (1851) 

Henry Wessel
[Photographer, b. 1942, Teaneck, New Jersey, lives in San Francisco.]

 The process of photographing is a pleasure: eyes open, receptive, sensing, and at some point, connecting. It’s thrilling to be outside your mind, your eyes far ahead of your thoughts. 

Clarence H. White
[Photographer, b. 1871, West Carlisle, Ohio, d. 1925, Mexico City.]

 I think the greatest weakness of the young worker is the lack of something to express. He is too much interested in the photograph for the sake of the photograph alone—that is, in the medium or in the taking of the photograph itself. The photograph should express something. 

Elie Wiesel
[Writer and activist, b. 1928, Sighet, Romania, lives in New York.]

 Sometimes I think I prefer the storyteller in [Roman Vishniac] to the photographer. But aren’t they one and the same?