Weegee (Usher Fellig)
[Photographer, b. 1899, Zlothew near Lemberg, Austrian Galicia (now Zolochiv, Ukraine), d. 1968, New York.]

 I had so many unsold murder pictures lying around my room... I felt as if I were renting out a wing of the City Morgue. 

Alex Webb
[Photographer, b. 1952, San Francisco, lives in Brooklyn, New York.]

 ... the possibility of one particular photographer’s pictures lying around the corner is never realized until the photographer is there. It’s one of the enigmas of photography. 

H.G. Wells
[Writer, b. 1866, Bromley, Kent, England, d. 1946, London.]

 I often think we do not take this business of photography in a sufficiently serious spirit. Issuing a photograph is like marriage: you can only undo the mischief with infinite woe... 

Henry Wessel
[Photographer, b. 1942, Teaneck, New Jersey, lives in San Francisco.]

 Most musicians I know don’t just play music on Saturday night. They play music every day. They are always fiddling around, letting the notes lead them from one place to another. Taking still photographs is like that. It is a generative process. It pulls you along. 

James McNeill Whistler
[Artist, b. 1834, Lowell, Massachusetts, d. 1903, London.]

 The imitator is a poor kind of creature. If the man who paints only the face, or flower, or other surface he sees before him were an artist, the king of artists would be the photographer. 

Clarence H. White
[Photographer, b. 1871, West Carlisle, Ohio, d. 1925, Mexico City.]

 I think the greatest weakness of the young worker is the lack of something to express. He is too much interested in the photograph for the sake of the photograph alone—that is, in the medium or in the taking of the photograph itself. The photograph should express something. 

Tom Waits
[Musician, b. 1949, Pomona, California, lives in Sonoma County, California.]

 Photos are profound because they have such short lives. They are more like fingerprints, dead leaves, rain puddles, or the corpses of flies. 

Walt Whitman
[Writer and poet, b. 1819, South Huntington, Long Island, New York, d. 1892, Camden, New Jersey.]

 [Mathew Brady and I] had many a talk together: the point was, how much better it would often be, rather than having a lot of contradictory records by witnesses or historians—say of Caesar, Socrates, Epictetus, others—if we could have three or four or half a dozen portraits—very accurate—of the men: that would be history—the best history—a history from which there could be no appeal. (1889)