Minor White
[Photographer, writer, and theorist, b. 1908, Minneapolis, Minnesota, d. 1976, Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 Photographers who come up with power never get accused of imitating anyone else even though they photograph the same broom, same street, same portraits. 

Albert Watson
[Photographer, b. 1942, Edinburgh, Scotland, lives in New York.]

 Really good portraiture is a two-way street where someone is throwing little gems out and you’re grabbing them. Very few people have a 100 percent fluency in being able to do to do this—this kind of magical reaction with a camera. 

Elie Wiesel
[Writer and activist, b. 1928, Sighet, Romania, lives in New York.]

 Sometimes I think I prefer the storyteller in [Roman Vishniac] to the photographer. But aren’t they one and the same? 

Art Wolfe
[Photographer, b. 1951, Seattle, Washington, lives in Seattle.]

 For me making a digital photo is like making a watercolor... It’s not a painting, and it’s not a photo. It’s something altogether new. 

Peter Wollen
[Writer, theorist, filmmaker, b. 1938, London, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The aesthetic discussion of photography is dominated by the concept of time. Photographs appear as devices stopping time and preserving fragments of the past, like flies in amber. 

Charis Wilson
[Model, b. 1914, San Francisco, d. 2009, Santa Cruz, California.]

 I knew I really didn’t look that good, and that Edward [Weston] had glorified me, but it was a very pleasant thing to be glorified and I couldn’t wait to go back for more. 

E.B. White
[Writer, b. 1899, Mount Vernon, New York, d. 1985, North Brooklin, Maine.]

 Of course, it may be that the arts of writing and photography are antithetical. The hope and aim of a word-handler is that he may communicate a thought or an impression to his reader without the reader’s realizing that he has been dragged through a series of hazardous or grotesque syntactical situations. In photography the goal seems to be to prove beyond a doubt that the cameraman, in his great moment of creation, was either hanging by his heels from the rafters or was wedged under the floor with his lens in a knothole. 

Jack Welpott
[Photographer, b. 1923, Kansas City, Missouri, d. 2007, Greenbrae, California.]

 I am still struck by the power of photography to strip away the bark of the mind and reveal the visceral workings underneath.