David Goldblatt
[Photographer, b. 1930, Randfontein, South Africa, d. 2018, Johannesburg.]

 I said that the camera was not a machine-gun and that photographers shouldn’t confuse their response to the politics of the country with their role as photographers. 

John Gutmann
[Photographer, b. 1905, Breslau, Germany, (now Wroclaw, Poland), d. 1998, San Francisco, California.]

 To me, photography was a completely new medium, and I did not... feel the urge to transfer to it my ideas about painting. 

William Garnett
[Photographer, b. 1916, Chicago, d. 2006, Napa, California.]

 To show people the ugly doesn’t accomplish much. I came to the conclusion that I can’t really make much of a change in society’s attitude towards land use by just showing them what’s wrong. I’ve come to the conclusion you have to show them what’s right, and inspire them. 

Leon Golub
[Artist, b. 1922, Chicago, Illinois, d. 2004, New York.]

 People say: “But photographs are all lies.” That’s not the point. The lie is a truth, too. How the hell are we going to know what Kissinger looks like? Well, the photograph tells us one version; I’m trying to tell it also, but differently. 

Flor Garduño
[Photographer, b. 1957, Mexico City, lives in Stabio, Switzerland.]

 Each picture... is a small legend about beauty, sex, wonder, and women’s intimate lives. 

Alexander Gardner
[Photographer, b. 1821, Paisley, Scotland, d. 1882, Washington, D.C.]

 [My work] is designed to speak for itself. as mementos of the fearful struggle through which the country has just passed, it is confidently hoped that it will possess an enduring interest. 

Paolo Gasparini
[Photographer, b. 1934, Gorizia, Italy, lives in Caracas, Venezuela.]

 Whether the formalists and Conceptualists like it or not, the image—the photograph—is a product of ideology. What is captured is the product of the person who triggers the shutter. 

Dan Graham
[Artist, critic, and theorist, b. 1942, Urbana, Illinois, lives in New York.]

 A [spatial, temporal] work had only to be exhibited in a gallery and then written about and reproduced as a photograph in an art magazine. Then this record of the no longer extant installation, along with accretions of information after the fact, became the basis for its fame, and to a large extent its economic value.