Peter Galassi
[Curator and writer, b. 1951, Washington, D.C., lives in New York.]

 ...photography is equally capable of recording everything and revealing nothing. (On portraits by Thomas Ruff) 

Ralph Gibson
[Photographer, b. 1939, Los Angeles, California, lives in New York.]

 I embrace the abstract in photography and exist on a few bits of order extracted from the chaos of reality. 

Leon Golub
[Artist, b. 1922, Chicago, Illinois, d. 2004, New York.]

 People say: “But photographs are all lies.” That’s not the point. The lie is a truth, too. How the hell are we going to know what Kissinger looks like? Well, the photograph tells us one version; I’m trying to tell it also, but differently. 

Nan Goldin
[Photographer, b. 1953, Washington, D.C., lives in New York and Paris.]

 [The snapshot is] the form of photography that is most defined by love. People take them out of love, and they take them to remember—people, places, and times. They’re about creating a history by recording a history. 

Laura Gilpin
[Photographer, b. 1891, Austin Bluffs, Colorado, d. 1979, Santa Fe, New Mexico.]

 The romance of the old West vanished so fast and so few ever did anything with it. Does it make you realize the importance of Art and how the main knowledge of history is through Art alone? 

Günter Grass
[Writer, b. 1927, Danzig, Germany (now Gdansk, Poland), d. 2015, Lübeck, Germany.]

 [To be an artist,] this desire to conquer all with images. 

Helmut Gernsheim
[Photographer, collector, and photohistorian, b. 1913, Munich, Germany, d. 1995, Lugano, Switzerland.]

 Your nightmare existence in a trunk is over... At long last you will be recognized as the inventor of photography. This picture will prove it to all the world. (On his discovery of the “first photograph,” made by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce.) 

George, Gilbert
[Artist, b. 1942, Devon, England, lives in London.]
[Artist, b. 1943, Dolomites, Italy, lives in London.]

 Surface vision and sensation have been adopted by Gilbert & George as their sole mode of perception... Governed now by a new form of awareness, sensation itself has none of its former easy-going quality: on occasion it can be downright painful. In a word, it consists in the power to visualize.