Bill Gates
[Businessman, b. 1955, Seattle, Washington, lives in Medina, Washington.]

 If you’re a guest [at my $113 million house], you’ll be able to call up on screens throughout the house almost any image you like—presidential portraits, reproductions of High Renaissance paintings, pictures of sunsets, airplanes, skiers in the Andes, a rare French stamp, the Beatles in 1965. 

Mahatma Gandhi (Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi)
[Political leader and thinker, b. 1869, Porbandar, Gujarat, India, d. 1948, New Delhi, India.]

 I believe in equality for everyone, except reporters and photographers. 

Andreas Gursky
[Photographer, b. 1955, Leipzig, Germany, lives in Dusseldorf.]

 Since the photographic medium has been digitized, a fixed definition of the term “photography” has become impossible. 

George
[Artist, b. 1942, Devon, England, lives in London.]

 Our reason for making pictures is to change people and not to congratulate them on being how they are. 

Francis Galton
[Polymath, explorer, anthropologist, inventor, meteorologist, statistician, b. 1822, Birmingham, England, d. Haslemere, Surrey, England.]

 [My composite portrait process] represents no man in particular, but portrays an imaginary figure possessing the average features of any group of men. These ideal faces have a surprising air of reality. Nobody who glanced at one of them for the first time, would doubt its being the likeness of a living person, yet, as I have said, it is no such thing; it is the portrait of a type and not of an individual. (1879) 

Ron Galella
[Photographer, b. 1931, Bronx, New York, lives in New York.]

 My job is thick with risks, threats, occasional violence and sometimes the necessary folly that sometimes courts humiliation and ridicule. But I don’t care. I see myself as the dean of American paparazzi. 

Bruce Gilden
[Photographer, b. 1946, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 I’m photographing myself out there. Not myself physically, but mentally. It’s my take on the world. 

Andy Grundberg
[Critic, curator, and educator, lives in Washington, D.C.]

 ...truth-telling may be an ethic, adopted by photojournalists as a behavior, but experience shows us that it is not embedded in the medium like silver salts in film.