Adam Gopnik
[Writer and critic, b. 1956, Philadelphia, lives in New York.]

 ... a fact about photography: we can look at people’s faces in photographs with an intensity and intimacy that in life we normally only reserve for extreme emotional states—for a first look at someone we may sleep with, or a last look at someone we love. 

Bill Gates
[Businessman, b. 1955, Seattle, Washington, lives in Medina, Washington.]

 If you’re a guest [at my $113 million house], you’ll be able to call up on screens throughout the house almost any image you like—presidential portraits, reproductions of High Renaissance paintings, pictures of sunsets, airplanes, skiers in the Andes, a rare French stamp, the Beatles in 1965. 

Ralph Gibson
[Photographer, b. 1939, Los Angeles, California, lives in New York.]

 I embrace the abstract in photography and exist on a few bits of order extracted from the chaos of reality. 

Francis Galton
[Polymath, explorer, anthropologist, inventor, meteorologist, statistician, b. 1822, Birmingham, England, d. Haslemere, Surrey, England.]

 [My composite portrait process] represents no man in particular, but portrays an imaginary figure possessing the average features of any group of men. These ideal faces have a surprising air of reality. Nobody who glanced at one of them for the first time, would doubt its being the likeness of a living person, yet, as I have said, it is no such thing; it is the portrait of a type and not of an individual. (1879) 

Peter Galassi
[Curator and writer, b. 1951, Washington, D.C., lives in New York.]

 ...ordinary photographs, especially when uprooted from their practical functions, contain a wealth of unintended, unpredictable meanings. The attempt to harness this centrifugal, obstreperous force forms a central tradition of modern photography. 

Andy Goldsworthy
[Artist, b. 1956, Cheshire, England, lives in Dumfriesshire, Scotland.]

 Photography is a way of putting distance between myself and the work which sometimes helps me to see more clearly what it is that I have made. 

Greg Gorman
[Photographer, b. 1949, Kansas City, Missouri, lives in Los Angeles and Mendocino, California.]

 Jeff [Koons] called me because he’d seen a portrait of David Bowie, at the beginning of the 80s—I’ve known Jeff for a long time—and he said, “Greg, I want to look like a high-profile celebrity, living on the edge.” I think that says it all. 

Paolo Gasparini
[Photographer, b. 1934, Gorizia, Italy, lives in Caracas, Venezuela.]

 Whether the formalists and Conceptualists like it or not, the image—the photograph—is a product of ideology. What is captured is the product of the person who triggers the shutter.