Andreas Gursky
[Photographer, b. 1955, Leipzig, Germany, lives in Dusseldorf.]

 In retrospect I can see that my desire to create abstractions has become more and more radical. Art should not be delivering a report on reality, but should be looking at what’s behind something. 

Greg Gorman
[Photographer, b. 1949, Kansas City, Missouri, lives in Los Angeles and Mendocino, California.]

 Jeff [Koons] called me because he’d seen a portrait of David Bowie, at the beginning of the 80s—I’ve known Jeff for a long time—and he said, “Greg, I want to look like a high-profile celebrity, living on the edge.” I think that says it all. 

Mario Giacomelli
[Photographer, b. 1925, Senigallia, Italy, d. 2000, Senigallia.]

 I don’t know about other people’s cameras. Mine is a thing I had cobbled up, it holds together with tape and is always losing parts. All I need to set is the distance and that other thing—what do you call that other thing? 

Clement Greenberg
[Critic, b. 1909, New York, d. 1994, New York.]

 ...there is about him and some of his disciples too much art with a capital A, and too many swans in his park are only geese. (1942, on Alfred Stieglitz) 

Arnold Genthe
[Photographer, b. 1869, Berlin, Germany, d. 1942, New York.]

 The tremendous development of the camera in recent years has been remarkable. Now almost anyone can take pictures, and most of them are doing it. But it is rather like giving a 6-year-old a pistol. (1937) 

God (Judeo-Christian Version)
[Omnipotent artist, critic, creator and destroyer, before time, lives everywhere and nowhere.]

 Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or likeness of any thing that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth: thou shalt not bow down thyself to them; nor serve them... (Judeo-Christian version of God; Exodus 20:4) 

Paolo Gasparini
[Photographer, b. 1934, Gorizia, Italy, lives in Caracas, Venezuela.]

 I think photographs can help us learn how to look. How to think about and resist this world that’s consecrated to the grandiloquence of symbols that propagate lies and that, more and more, reduce and undervalue life. 

Francis Galton
[Polymath, explorer, anthropologist, inventor, meteorologist, statistician, b. 1822, Birmingham, England, d. Haslemere, Surrey, England.]

 [My composite portrait process] represents no man in particular, but portrays an imaginary figure possessing the average features of any group of men. These ideal faces have a surprising air of reality. Nobody who glanced at one of them for the first time, would doubt its being the likeness of a living person, yet, as I have said, it is no such thing; it is the portrait of a type and not of an individual. (1879)