Andy Grundberg
[Critic, curator, and educator, lives in Washington, D.C.]

 The photograph suggests that our image of reality is made up of images. It makes explicit the domination of mediation. 

Francis Galton
[Polymath, explorer, anthropologist, inventor, meteorologist, statistician, b. 1822, Birmingham, England, d. Haslemere, Surrey, England.]

 [My composite portrait process] represents no man in particular, but portrays an imaginary figure possessing the average features of any group of men. These ideal faces have a surprising air of reality. Nobody who glanced at one of them for the first time, would doubt its being the likeness of a living person, yet, as I have said, it is no such thing; it is the portrait of a type and not of an individual. (1879) 

Dan Graham
[Artist, critic, and theorist, b. 1942, Urbana, Illinois, lives in New York.]

 A [spatial, temporal] work had only to be exhibited in a gallery and then written about and reproduced as a photograph in an art magazine. Then this record of the no longer extant installation, along with accretions of information after the fact, became the basis for its fame, and to a large extent its economic value. 

Allen Ginsberg
[Poet and writer, b. 1926, Newark, New Jersey, d. 1997, New York.]

 We are all exposed to the flash bulb of death. 

John Gossage
[Photographer, b. 1946, Staten Island, New York, lives in Washington D.C..]

 You can do anything you like, it’s all fiction. 

Paul Graham
[Photographer, b. 1956, Stafford, England, lives in New York.]

 [The] unique qualities of [photography are] its struggle to deal with time and life. Sometimes I think those are our materials. Not film, not paper, not prints: time and life. 

Clement Greenberg
[Critic, b. 1909, New York, d. 1994, New York.]

 ...there is about him and some of his disciples too much art with a capital A, and too many swans in his park are only geese. (1942, on Alfred Stieglitz) 

George, Gilbert
[Artist, b. 1942, Devon, England, lives in London.]
[Artist, b. 1943, Dolomites, Italy, lives in London.]

 We show the dark side a pleasant character. A person of whom not one would speak unkindly. But here in the shadowy photographic angle the forms show definition of luck and concealed are movements of qualities of flesh and person.