William Gibson
[Writer, b. 1948, Conway, South Carolina, lives in Vancouver, Canada.]

 Case turned his head and looked up into Wage’s face. It was a tanned and forgettable mask. The eyes were vatgrown sea-green Nikon transplants. Wage wore a suit of gunmetal silk and a simple bracelet of platinum on either wrist. (1984) 

Dennis Grady
[lives in South Pomfret, Vermont.]

 Display of the captive before the camera lens, the condition Crazy Horse so ardently avoided, quickly became a ritual of power. The U.S. Cavalry photographically documented hundreds of captive Indians along their forced marches to penal colony reservations, and such images are commonplace in histories of the West. 

Guido Guidi
[Photographer, b. 1941, Cesena, Italy, lives in Ravenna, Italy.]

 I was interested in everything: the portrait of a person, of a house, of a wall…. Nothing was unimportant; everything was worthy of attention. 

Mario Giacomelli
[Photographer, b. 1925, Senigallia, Italy, d. 2000, Senigallia.]

 Photography is not difficult—as long as you have something to say. 

Jonathan Green
[Writer, photographer, and curator, b. 1939, lives in Riverside, California.]

 It was consistent with the social and psychological upheavals of the sixties that a documentary focus should emerge that looked at the less newsworthy, internal aspects of the new culture... The obsessions of sixties photography were ruthless: alienation, deformity, sterility, insanity, sexuality, bestial and mechanical violence, and obscenity. 

Dan Graham
[Artist, critic, and theorist, b. 1942, Urbana, Illinois, lives in New York.]

 A [spatial, temporal] work had only to be exhibited in a gallery and then written about and reproduced as a photograph in an art magazine. Then this record of the no longer extant installation, along with accretions of information after the fact, became the basis for its fame, and to a large extent its economic value. 

Bill Gates
[Businessman, b. 1955, Seattle, Washington, lives in Medina, Washington.]

 If you’re a guest [at my $113 million house], you’ll be able to call up on screens throughout the house almost any image you like—presidential portraits, reproductions of High Renaissance paintings, pictures of sunsets, airplanes, skiers in the Andes, a rare French stamp, the Beatles in 1965. 

Flor Garduño
[Photographer, b. 1957, Mexico City, lives in Stabio, Switzerland.]

 Each picture... is a small legend about beauty, sex, wonder, and women’s intimate lives.