Leon Golub
[Artist, b. 1922, Chicago, Illinois, d. 2004, New York.]

 People say: “But photographs are all lies.” That’s not the point. The lie is a truth, too. How the hell are we going to know what Kissinger looks like? Well, the photograph tells us one version; I’m trying to tell it also, but differently. 

Mario Giacomelli
[Photographer, b. 1925, Senigallia, Italy, d. 2000, Senigallia.]

 I don’t know about other people’s cameras. Mine is a thing I had cobbled up, it holds together with tape and is always losing parts. All I need to set is the distance and that other thing—what do you call that other thing? 

Woody Guthrie
[Singer-songwriter, b. 1912, Okemah, Oklahoma, d. 1967, New York.]

 If you walk across my camera I will flash the world your story. 

Clement Greenberg
[Critic, b. 1909, New York, d. 1994, New York.]

 The art in photography is literary art before it is anything else: its triumphs and monuments are historical, anecdotal, reportorial, observational before they are purely pictorial... The photograph has to tell a story if it is to work as art. 

Paolo Gasparini
[Photographer, b. 1934, Gorizia, Italy, lives in Caracas, Venezuela.]

 I think photographs can help us learn how to look. How to think about and resist this world that’s consecrated to the grandiloquence of symbols that propagate lies and that, more and more, reduce and undervalue life. 

George Grosz
[Artist, b. 1893, Berlin, d. 1959, Berlin.]

 In 1916, when Johnny Heartfield and I invented photomontage in my studio at the south end of the town at five o’clock one May morning, we had no idea of the immense possibilities, or of the thorny but successful career, that awaited the new invention. On a piece of cardboard we pasted a mishmash of advertisements for hernia belts, student song books and dog food, labels from schnaps and wine bottles, and photographs from picture papers, cut up at will in such a way as to say, in pictures, what would have been banned by the censors if we had said it in words. 

Andreas Gursky
[Photographer, b. 1955, Leipzig, Germany, lives in Dusseldorf.]

 In retrospect I can see that my desire to create abstractions has become more and more radical. Art should not be delivering a report on reality, but should be looking at what’s behind something. 

Guido Guidi
[Photographer, b. 1941, Cesena, Italy, lives in Ravenna, Italy.]

 I was interested in everything: the portrait of a person, of a house, of a wall…. Nothing was unimportant; everything was worthy of attention.