Joseph Goebbels
[Nazi Minister of Propaganda, b. 1897, Rheydt, Germany, d. 1945, Berlin.]

 The experience of the individual has become the experience of the people, thanks solely to the camera. 

George, Gilbert
[Artist, b. 1942, Devon, England, lives in London.]
[Artist, b. 1943, Dolomites, Italy, lives in London.]

 We show the dark side a pleasant character. A person of whom not one would speak unkindly. But here in the shadowy photographic angle the forms show definition of luck and concealed are movements of qualities of flesh and person. 

Bill Gates
[Businessman, b. 1955, Seattle, Washington, lives in Medina, Washington.]

 If you’re a guest [at my $113 million house], you’ll be able to call up on screens throughout the house almost any image you like—presidential portraits, reproductions of High Renaissance paintings, pictures of sunsets, airplanes, skiers in the Andes, a rare French stamp, the Beatles in 1965. 

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
[Poet, novelist, playwright, and natural philosopher, b. 1749, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, d. 1832, Weimar, Germany.]

 The hardest thing to see is what is in front of your eyes. (Maxim often quoted by Albert Renger-Patzsch.) 

Nan Goldin
[Photographer, b. 1953, Washington, D.C., lives in New York and Paris.]

 When you set up pictures you’re not at any risk. Reality involves chance and risk and diving for pearls. 

Paul Graham
[Photographer, b. 1956, Stafford, England, lives in New York.]

 The problem is that the term “documentary” is used to describe nearly every photographer who works from life-as-it-is. If someone makes food with vegetables from their garden, are they doing documentary cooking? 

Allen Ginsberg
[Poet and writer, b. 1926, Newark, New Jersey, d. 1997, New York.]

 Whoever controls the media—the images—controls the culture. 

Dan Graham
[Artist, critic, and theorist, b. 1942, Urbana, Illinois, lives in New York.]

 A [spatial, temporal] work had only to be exhibited in a gallery and then written about and reproduced as a photograph in an art magazine. Then this record of the no longer extant installation, along with accretions of information after the fact, became the basis for its fame, and to a large extent its economic value.