Susie Linfield
[Writer and critic, lives in New York.]

 Every image of barbarism—of immiseration, humiliation, terror, extermination—embraces its opposite, though sometimes unknowingly. Every image of suffering says not only, “This is so,” but also, by implication: “This must stop.” 

Jacques-Henri Lartigue
[Photographer, b. 1894, Courbevoie, France, d. 1986, Nice, France.]

 To talk about photos rather than making them seems idiotic to me. It’s as though I went on and on about a woman I adored instead of making love to her. 

Clarence John Laughlin
[Photographer, b. 1905, Lake Charles, Louisiana, d. 1985, New Orleans, Louisiana.]

 The mystery of light [and] the enigma of time form the twin pivots around which all my work revolves. In addition... my work attempts to create a mythology for our contemporary world. 

Jean-François Lyotard
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1924, Versaille, France, d. 1998, Paris.]

 One knows that frontal and/or profile photography is torn to pieces... Inversely, what remains of the photograph must be seen as a fragment coming to fill a gap in the drawing. 

Michael Light
[Photographer, b. 1963, Florida, lives in San Francisco.]

 ... anybody who has spent time with cameras and photographs knows that images, like gravestone rubbings, are no more than impressions of the truth. 

Sol LeWitt
[Artist and theorist, b. 1928, Hartford, Connecticut, d. 2007, New York.]

 What the work of art looks like isn’t too important. 

Louise Lawler
[Artist, b. 1947, Bronxville, New York, lives in New York.]

 You know, I’m not even comfortable taking photographs when I know what I’m taking. I feel as if approaching something with too much clarity in advance could eliminate possibilities. 

Brigitte Lacombe
[Photographer, b. 1950, Paris, France, lives in New York.]

 I take pictures all the time. It’s alarming, really. I mean, I wish I could stop! I take snaps of everything, like taking notes. It became a way to look at the world.