Annie Leibovitz
[Photographer, b. 1949, Westbury, Connecticut, lives in New York.]

 People buy ideas, they don’t buy photographs. 

Jacques-Henri Lartigue
[Photographer, b. 1894, Courbevoie, France, d. 1986, Nice, France.]

 One shouldn’t be only two photographers but thousands. 

Lucy Lippard
[Critic and writer, b. 1936, New York, lives in Galisteo, New Mexico.]

 Men have dominated the field of landscape photography just as they have dominated the land itself. Thus “shooting” a “virgin” landscape has been man’s work—hunting, not gardening. 

David LaChapelle
[Photographer, b. 1968, Connecticut, lives in New York.]

 I think we’re in a post-pornographic time and nothing seems shocking, but everything remains carnal no matter what you do. 

Gustave Le Gray
[Photographer, b. 1820, Villiers-le-Bel, France, d. 1884, Cairo, Egypt.]

 It is my deepest wish that photography, instead of falling in the domain of industry, of commerce, will be included among the arts. That is its sole, true place, and that is the direction that I shall always endeavor to guide it. (1852) 

Walter Lippmann
[Writer and journalist, b. 1889, New York, d. 1974, New York.]

 Photographs have the kind of authority over imagination today, which the printed word had yesterday, and the spoken word before that. They seem utterly real. (1922) 

Yve Lomax
[Artist and theorist, b. 1952, Dorset, lives in London.]

 Just when it is thought that we have progressed to the zenith of our modern world, a sudden wind picks up at midday: the sound of the signifier becomes a howl, an endless reverberation; we fear that the world has become hollow. We fear there is no central core. There is no presence immediate unto itself, no thing-in-itself. Nothing comes before, everything comes after. We are living in a ‘post’ world. A world without a fixed reference point. A world without origin. 

Jerome Liebling
[Photographer, b. 1924, New York, d. 2011, Northampton, Massachusetts.]

 These days it seems that physical “truth” can easily be rearranged, rethought, or re-created outright. Any image can be made pristine, all the warts can be removed. But returning to the source of a thing—the real source—means the photographer has to watch, dig, listen for voices, sniff the smells, and have many doubts. My life in photography has been lived as a skeptic.