Jerome Liebling
[Photographer, b. 1924, New York, d. 2011, Northampton, Massachusetts.]

 These days it seems that physical “truth” can easily be rearranged, rethought, or re-created outright. Any image can be made pristine, all the warts can be removed. But returning to the source of a thing—the real source—means the photographer has to watch, dig, listen for voices, sniff the smells, and have many doubts. My life in photography has been lived as a skeptic. 

Edwin Land
[Inventor and entrepreneur, b. 1909, Bridgeport, Connecticut, d. 1991, Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 Don’t undertake a project unless it is manifestly important and nearly impossible. 

Lucy Lippard
[Critic and writer, b. 1936, New York, lives in Galisteo, New Mexico.]

 Despite having been awarded the dubious honor of arthood, all photography is still perceived as having one foot in the real world, a toe in the chilly waters of verisimilitude, no matter how often it is demonstrated that photographs can and do lie. 

Jacques Lacan
[Writer and psychoanalyst, b. 1901, Paris, France, d. 1981, Paris.]

 The evil eye is the fascinum, it is that which has the effect of arresting movement and, literally, of killing life. At the moment the subject stops, suspending his gesture, he is mortified. This anti-life, anti-movement function of the terminal point is the fascinum, and it is precisely one of the dimensions in which the power of the gaze is exercised directly. 

Georg Lukács
[Historian, critic, and thinker, b. 1885, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1971, Budapest.]

 In montage’s original form as photomontage, it is capable of striking effects and on occasion it can even become a powerful political weapon. Such effects arise from its technique of juxtaposing heterogeneous, unrelated pieces of reality torn from their context. A good photomontage has the same effect as a good joke. 

Federico Garcia Lorca
[Poet and playright, b. 1898, Fuente Vaqueros, Granada, Spain, d. 1936, near Barranco de Viznar, Granada.]

 What shall I do now? Align all the landscapes? Muster the lovers who turn into photographs... ? 

Nathan Lyons
[Photographer, writer, and curator, b. 1930, Jamaica, New York, d. 2016, Rochester, New York.]

 Photography has achieved an unprecedented mirroring of the things in our culture. We have pictured so many aspects and objects of our environment in the form of photographs (motion pictures and television) that the composite of these representations has assumed the proportions and identity of an actual environment. 

D.H. Lawrence
[Writer, b. 1885, Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, England, d. 1930, Vence, France.]

 The identifying of ourselves with the visual image of ourselves has become an instinct; the habit is already old. The picture of me, the me that is seen, is me. (1925)