Annie Leibovitz
[Photographer, b. 1949, Westbury, Connecticut, lives in New York.]

 ...I gave up on being a journalist—I thought having a point of view was more important than being objective. 

Federico Garcia Lorca
[Poet and playright, b. 1898, Fuente Vaqueros, Granada, Spain, d. 1936, near Barranco de Viznar, Granada.]

 What shall I do now? Align all the landscapes? Muster the lovers who turn into photographs... ? 

Henry Luce
[Publisher, b. 1898, Dengzhou, China, d. 1967, Phoenix, Arizona.]

 To see life. To see the world. To watch the faces of the poor, and the gestures of the proud. To see strange things. Machines, armies, multitudes, and shadows in the jungle. To see, and to take pleasure in seeing. To see and be instructed. To see and be amazed. (Describing the powers of photography; written for the launch of LIFE Magazine, 1936.) 

El Lissitzky (Eleazar Markovich Lisitskii)
[Artist, b. 1890, Vitebsk, Russia, d. 1941, Schodnia, Soviet Union.]

 Art can no longer be merely a mirror, it must act as the organizer of the people’s consciousness... No form of representation is so readily comprehensible to the masses as photography. 

Saul Leiter
[Photographer, b. 1923, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, d. 2013, New York.]

 I go out to take a walk, I see something, I take a picture. I take photographs. I have avoided profound explanations of what I do. 

Michael Lesy
[Writer and artist, b. 1945, Shaker Heights, Ohio, lives in Amherst, Massachusetts.]

 By itself, an ordinary snapshot is no less banal than the petite madeleine in Proust’s In Search of Lost Time… but as goad to memory, it is often the first integer in a sequence of recollections that has the power to deny time for the sake of love. 

Michael Light
[Photographer, b. 1963, Florida, lives in San Francisco.]

 Even in this age of digital manipulation, photographs continue to hold a huge degree of power and meaning. They’re beautiful and sad and complicated because every stoppage of time refers to the motion of time. 

Abraham Lincoln
[Lawyer, politician, and leader, b. 1809, Hodgenville, Kentucky, d. 1865, Washington, D.C..]

 There are no bad pictures; that’s just how your face looks sometimes.