Sherrie Levine
[Artist, b. 1947, Hazleton, Pennsylvania, lives in New York.]

 Maybe I should see things as they really are and not as I want them to be. 

Helen Levitt
[Photographer, b. 1918, New York, d. 2009, New York.]

 I never had a “project.” I would go out and shoot, follow my eyes—what they noticed, I tried to capture with my camera, for others to see. 

Lucy Lippard
[Critic and writer, b. 1936, New York, lives in Galisteo, New Mexico.]

 There is indeed something omnivorous about the act of photography. It offers a way of responding to everything about everything. 

Clarence John Laughlin
[Photographer, b. 1905, Lake Charles, Louisiana, d. 1985, New Orleans, Louisiana.]

 The mystery of light [and] the enigma of time form the twin pivots around which all my work revolves. In addition... my work attempts to create a mythology for our contemporary world. 

Georg Lukács
[Historian, critic, and thinker, b. 1885, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1971, Budapest.]

 In montage’s original form as photomontage, it is capable of striking effects and on occasion it can even become a powerful political weapon. Such effects arise from its technique of juxtaposing heterogeneous, unrelated pieces of reality torn from their context. A good photomontage has the same effect as a good joke. 

Glenn Ligon
[Artist, b. 1960, Bronx, New York, lives in New York.]

 The impulse to reuse, recycle, and recontextualize is nothing new. What is new is the overabundance of images we have to choose from. The task is to see whether something can be made from them. I do not wish to add any more. (2012) 

Jacques Lacan
[Writer and psychoanalyst, b. 1901, Paris, France, d. 1981, Paris.]

 The evil eye is the fascinum, it is that which has the effect of arresting movement and, literally, of killing life. At the moment the subject stops, suspending his gesture, he is mortified. This anti-life, anti-movement function of the terminal point is the fascinum, and it is precisely one of the dimensions in which the power of the gaze is exercised directly. 

Saul Leiter
[Photographer, b. 1923, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, d. 2013, New York.]

 Some photographers think that by taking pictures of human misery, they are addressing a serious problem. I do not think that misery is more profound than happiness.