Richard Long
[Artist, b. 1945, Bristol, England, lives in Bristol.]

 I am an artist who sometimes chooses to use photographs, although I am not a photographer. 

Jacques-Henri Lartigue
[Photographer, b. 1894, Courbevoie, France, d. 1986, Nice, France.]

 To talk about photos rather than making them seems idiotic to me. It’s as though I went on and on about a woman I adored instead of making love to her. 

Jacques Lacan
[Writer and psychoanalyst, b. 1901, Paris, France, d. 1981, Paris.]

 The evil eye is the fascinum, it is that which has the effect of arresting movement and, literally, of killing life. At the moment the subject stops, suspending his gesture, he is mortified. This anti-life, anti-movement function of the terminal point is the fascinum, and it is precisely one of the dimensions in which the power of the gaze is exercised directly. 

Claude Lévi-Strauss
[Anthropologist, b. 1908, Brussels, Belgium, d. 2009, Paris.]

 [Photography] remains servile to a “thoughtless” vision of the world… As the term snapshot suggests, photography seizes the moment and exhibits it. 

Henry Luce
[Publisher, b. 1898, Dengzhou, China, d. 1967, Phoenix, Arizona.]

 To see life. To see the world. To watch the faces of the poor, and the gestures of the proud. To see strange things. Machines, armies, multitudes, and shadows in the jungle. To see, and to take pleasure in seeing. To see and be instructed. To see and be amazed. (Describing the powers of photography; written for the launch of LIFE Magazine, 1936.) 

Abraham Lincoln
[Lawyer, politician, and leader, b. 1809, Hodgenville, Kentucky, d. 1865, Washington, D.C..]

 There are no bad pictures; that’s just how your face looks sometimes. 

Claude Lanzmann
[Filmmaker, b. 1925, Paris, lives in Paris.]

 I think that no one human being would have been able to look at [a hypothetical photographic record of the Nazi gassing of Jews]… I would have preferred to destroy it. It is not visible. 

Lucretius (Titus Lucretius Carus)
[Poet and philosopher, b. 99 BC, Rome, d. 55 BC, Rome.]

 There exist what we call images (simulacra) of things; which, like films drawn from the outermost surface of things, flit about hither and thither through the air, it is these same that, encountering us in wakeful hours, terrify our minds, as also in sleep, when we often seem to behold wonderful shapes and images of the dead... lest by chance we should think that spirits escape from Acheron or ghosts flit about amongst the living... . I say, therefore, that semblances and thin shapes of things are thrown off from the outer surface, which are to be called as it were their films or bark, because the images bears a look and shape like the body of that from which it is shed to go on its way.