Loretta Lux
[Photographer, b. 1969, Dresden, Germany, lives in Dublin, Ireland.]

 I trained as a painter, and I still love painting, but eventually I became aware that the physical aspect of painting didn’t really suit me. I didn’t enjoy working in the medium. It’s very messy. I prefer to have it clean, with a nice computer. 

O. Winston Link
[Photographer, b. 1914, Brooklyn, New York, d. 2001, South Salem, New York.]

 You can’t move the sun, and you can’t even move the tracks, so you have to do something else to better light the engines. 

Abraham Lincoln
[Lawyer, politician, and leader, b. 1809, Hodgenville, Kentucky, d. 1865, Washington, D.C..]

 There are no bad pictures; that’s just how your face looks sometimes. 

Walter Lippmann
[Writer and journalist, b. 1889, New York, d. 1974, New York.]

 Photographs have the kind of authority over imagination today, which the printed word had yesterday, and the spoken word before that. They seem utterly real. (1922) 

Bernard-Henri Lévy
[Writer and critic, b. 1948, Béni Saf, Algeria, lives in St-Paul-de-Vence, France.]

 No one wants to see; no one wants to hear. We have to force them to see it, then. There has to be a terrorism of the gaze. 

Annie Leibovitz
[Photographer, b. 1949, Westbury, Connecticut, lives in New York.]

 ...I gave up on being a journalist—I thought having a point of view was more important than being objective. 

Henry Luce
[Publisher, b. 1898, Dengzhou, China, d. 1967, Phoenix, Arizona.]

 To see life. To see the world. To watch the faces of the poor, and the gestures of the proud. To see strange things. Machines, armies, multitudes, and shadows in the jungle. To see, and to take pleasure in seeing. To see and be instructed. To see and be amazed. (Describing the powers of photography; written for the launch of LIFE Magazine, 1936.) 

Nathan Lyons
[Photographer, writer, and curator, b. 1930, Jamaica, New York, d. 2016, Rochester, New York.]

 Photography has achieved an unprecedented mirroring of the things in our culture. We have pictured so many aspects and objects of our environment in the form of photographs (motion pictures and television) that the composite of these representations has assumed the proportions and identity of an actual environment.