Pipilotti Rist
[Artist, b. 1962, Reinthal, Switzerland, lives in Zurich and Los Angeles.]

 Sexuality, eroticism and desire are important for all of us. But that is also the contradiction. How can we speak about pictures and, for example, say no to this way of representing a woman’s body? It’s also a camera-and-object problem, of who is really guiding the camera. 

Leni Riefenstahl
[Filmmaker and photographer, b. 1902, Berlin, Germany, d. 2003, Poecking, Germany.]

 In 1934 people were crazy and there was great enthusiasm for Hitler. We had to try and find that with our camera. 

Wilhelm Röntgen
[Physicist, b. 1845, Lennep, Germany, d. 1923, Weilheim, Germany.]

 For me photography was the means to the end, but they made it the most important thing. (On the discovery of X-ray photography.) 

Rankin (John Rankin Waddell)
[Photographer, b. 1966, Glasgow, Scotland, lives in London.]

 At the end of the day, photography is ninety-nine percent business, connections, and politics and one percent creativity. 

Ayn Rand (Alisa Zinov’yevna Rosenbaum)
[Writer, b. 1905, Saint Petersburg, Russia, d. 1982, New York.]

 Words are a lens to focus one’s mind. 

Adrienne Rich
[Feminist and writer, b. 1929, Baltimore, Maryland, d. 2012, Santa Cruz, California.]

 Whatever is unnamed, undepicted in images, whatever is omitted from biography, censored in collections of letters, whatever is misnamed as something else, made difficult to come by, whatever is buried in the memory by the collapse of meaning under an inadequate or lying language, this will become not merely unspoken, but unspeakable. 

Henry Peach Robinson
[Photographer, b. 1830, Ludlow, Shropshire, England, d. 1901, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England.]

 ... any “dodge,” or trick, or conjuration of any kind is open to the photographer’s use so that it belongs to his art and is not false to nature. If the dodges, tricks, etc., lead the photographer astray, so much the worse for him; if they do not assist him to represent nature, he is not fit to use them. It is not the fault of the dodges, it is the fault of the bungler. 

Sophie Ristelhueber
[Photographer, b. 1949, Paris, lives in Paris.]

 I have these obsessions that I do not completely understand, with the deep mark, with the ruptured surface, with scars and traces, traces that human beings are leaving on the earth. It is not a comment on the environment... it is metaphysical.