George Rodger
[Photojournalist, b. 1908, Hale, Cheshire, England, d. 1995, Smarden, Kent, England.]

 When I discovered that I could look at the horror of Belsen—4,000 dead and starving lying around—and think only of a nice photographic composition, I knew something had happened to me and it had to stop. 

Eva Rubinstein
[Photographer, b. 1933, Buenos Aires, Argentina, lives in New York and Paris.]

 After I have photographed the way I like to, I feel as I might if I had been making love all day, marvelous and exhausted and wanting to collapse on the floor in a heap. That’s why I can’t photograph just anybody, and why it’s so hard to photograph people on assignment; it’s like going to bed with someone not of my choosing. 

Oscar Rejlander
[Photographer, b. 1817, Sweden, d. 1875, London.]

 [Photography] is fair, open, and aboveboard. There is no sham about it—no pretensions to anything that is not desirable. And the world wouldn’t be without it, in all its branches—including the one I most practice, art-studies and details from the life. Though to me this branch of the art is unprofitable, yet it gives me pleasure. I live in it, if not by it. (1863) 

Arthur Rothstein
[Writer, b. 1915, New York, d. 1985, New Rochelle, New York.]

 ...a photographer must be aware of and concerned about the words that accompany a picture. These words should be considered as carefully as the lighting, exposure and composition of the photograph. 

Ed Ruscha
[Artist, b. 1937, Omaha, Nebraska, lives in Los Angeles.]

 I just use [the camera]. I just pick it up like an axe when I’ve got to chop down a tree. I pick up a camera and go out and shoot the pictures I have to shoot. 

Ronald Reagan
[Actor and politician, b. 1911, Tampico, Illinois, d. 2004, Bel Air, California.]

 I like photographers—you don’t ask questions. (To a gathering of the White House News Photographers Association) 

Man Ray (Emanuel Radnitsky)
[Artist, b. 1890, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, d. 1976, Paris.]

 I photograph what I do not wish to paint and I paint what I cannot photograph. 

Theodore Roethke
[Poet, b. 1908, Saginaw, Michigan, d. 1963, Bainbridge Island, Washington.]

 The eye, of course, is not enough. But the outer eye serves the inner eye, that’s the point.