Ronald Reagan
[Actor and politician, b. 1911, Tampico, Illinois, d. 2004, Bel Air, California.]

 I like photographers—you don’t ask questions. (To a gathering of the White House News Photographers Association) 

Willy Ronis
[Photographer, b. 1910, Montmartre, Paris, d. 2009, Paris.]

 We do not see what is “real,” we see what we are. 

Donald Rumsfeld
[Bureaucrat, U.S. Secretary of Defense, b. 1932, Chicago, lives in St. Michaels, Maryland.]

 It is the photographs that gives one the vivid realization of what actually took place. (On photographs from Abu Ghraib prison.) 

Aleksander Rodchenko
[Artist, designer, architect, b. 1891, St. Petersburg, d. 1956, Moscow.]

 Art has no place in modern life. It will continue to exist as long as there is a mania for the romantic and so long as there are people who love beautiful lies and deception... Every modern cultured man must wage war against art, as against opium... Photograph and be photographed. 

Ad Reinhardt
[Artist, b. 1913, Buffalo, New York, d. 1967, New York.]

 The eye is a menace to clear sight. 

Eva Rubinstein
[Photographer, b. 1933, Buenos Aires, Argentina, lives in New York and Paris.]

 After I have photographed the way I like to, I feel as I might if I had been making love all day, marvelous and exhausted and wanting to collapse on the floor in a heap. That’s why I can’t photograph just anybody, and why it’s so hard to photograph people on assignment; it’s like going to bed with someone not of my choosing. 

Thomas Roma
[Photographer, b. 1950, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Brooklyn.]

 Imagine what Masaccio or Leonardo would have done if they had an instrument with which they could point, push a button, and get an image. 

Fred Ritchin
[Critic and writer, b. 1952, Washington, D.C., lives in New York.]

 And the wars? Can our photographs do anything at all? (Or do we turn it all into image so that it will bother us less?)