Ruth Bernhard
[Photographer, b. 1905, Berlin, d. 2006, San Francisco.]

 Fall in love. Every day. With everything. With life. If you can fall in love, you can be a photographer. I think that is absolutely essential. 

John Szarkowski
[Curator, critic, historian, and photographer, b. 1925, Ashland, Wisconsin, d. 2007, Pittsfield, Massachusetts.]

 The compelling clarity with which a photograph recorded the trivial suggested that… it was in fact not trivial, but filled with undiscovered meaning. 

Daido Moriyama
[Photographer, b. 1938, Ikeda-cho, Osaka, Japan, lives in Tokyo.]

 Until a few years ago, I was able to stave off an awareness that there is not an ounce of beauty in the world, and that humanity is a thing of extreme hideousness. So I could shoot and believe in something. (1972) 

Thomas Demand
[Photographer, b. 1964, Munich, Germany, lives in Los Angeles.]

 [Cameras] start to interpret life to us, which is a tautological circle, and I wonder how long you can feed yourself with yourself. 

David Wojnarowicz
[Artist and activist, b. 1954, Redbank, New Jersey, d. 1990, New York.]

 To me, photographs are like words and I generally will place many photographs together or print them one inside the other in order to construct a free-floating sentence that speaks about the world I witness. 

André Kertész
[Photographer, b. 1894, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1985, New York.]

 You do not have to imagine things; reality gives you all you need. 

Jean Paul Sartre
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1905, Paris, d. 1980, Paris.]

 Here I am, bent over the keyhole; suddenly I hear a footstep. I shudder as a wave of shame sweeps over me. Somebody has seen me. 

Susan Sontag
[Writer, theorist, and critic, b. 1933, New York, d. 2004, New York.]

 Though photographs, the world becomes a series of unrelated, free-standing particles; and history, past and present, a set of anecdotes and faits divers. The camera makes reality atomic, manageable, and opaque. It is a view of the world which denies interconnectedness, continuity, but which confers on each moment the character of a mystery.