John Muir
[Self-described "Poetico-trampo-geologist-botanist and ornithologist-naturalist etc.", b. 1838, Dunbar, Scotland, d. 1914, Los Angeles.]

 See how willingly Nature poses herself upon photographers’ plates. No earthly chemicals are so sensitive as those of the human soul. 

Duane Michals
[Photographer, b. 1932, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, lives in New York.]

 What’s important to me is the idea. It doesn’t have to be a perfect, Ansel Adams,‘f64’ picture. 

Janet Malcolm
[Writer, b. 1934, Prague, Czechoslovakia, lives in New York.]

 I was always trying to take art photographs, but the most interesting pictures were the snapshots. The artsy pictures were boring, always. 

Kate Moss
[Model, b. 1974, Croydon, England, lives in St Johns Wood, England.]

 In a way, it’s like the photographer always has his vision of me. The pictures that I’m known for are not really my image, they’re always the photographer’s vision of me. I can look a hundred different ways, but what people see of me in pictures is not really my image. 

Georges Méliès
[Filmmaker and magician, b. 1861, Paris, d. 1938, Paris.]

 The trick, intelligently applied, today allows us to make visible the supernatural, the imaginary, even the impossible. 

Henri Matisse
[Artist, b. 1869, Le Cateau-Cambrésis, France, d. 1954, Nice, France.]

 Everything that we see in our daily lives is more or less distorted by acquired habits and this is perhaps more evident in an age like ours when cinema posters and magazines present us every day with a flood of ready-made images which are to the eye what prejudices are to the mind. The effort to see things without distortion demands a kind of courage; and this courage is essential to the artist, who has to look at everything as though he were seeing it for the first time. 

Ralph Eugene Meatyard
[Photographer, b. 1925, Normal, Illinois, d. 1972, Lexington, Kentucky.]

 ... if [a photograph is] unbelievably real it becomes superreal or another kind of super real, better than real… [it] also can be, I think, so heartfelt that you almost can get a pang of compassion for the thing. 

Sheila Metzner
[Photographer, b. 1939, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 Photographers are often transformed by their own work. They should look at themselves every now and again to make sure they haven't become some kind of beast.