Samuel Morse
[Inventor and artist, b. 1791, Charlestown, Massachusetts, d. 1872, New York.]

 [The daguerreotype will] banish the sketchy, slovenly daubs that pass for spirited and learned; those works which possess mere general effect without detail, because, forsooth, detail destroys general effect. Nature, in the results of Daguerre’s process, has taken the pencil into her own hands, and she shows that the minutest detail disturbs not the general repose. (1839) 

Donald McCullin
[Photographer, b. 1935, Finsbury Park, London, lives in Somerset, England.]

 Photography has been very, very generous to me, but at the same time has damaged me. 

William Mortensen
[Photographer and writer, b. 1897, Park City, Utah, d. 1965, Laguna Beach, California.]

 Thoughts and emotions cannot be photographed, despite the protestations of some mystically minded portraitists. Physical fact is ultimately the sole pictorial material. 

Arno Rafael Minkkinen
[Photographer, b. 1945, Helsinki, Finland, lives in Andover, Massachusetts.]

 I think photography piles up the limitations more than any other medium I know… To outwit the calamities, I have learned to formulate a partnership with spontaneity. 

Richard Misrach
[Photographer, b. 1949, Los Angeles, lives in San Francisco.]

 Every photograph is a measure of time. Perhaps each can even be considered a metaphysical time-stamp of sorts. 

Annette Messager
[Artist, b. 1943, Berck-sur-Mer, France, lives in Paris.]

 Pornography is about images that are repeated, saturated. Images of the human body, not nature. What I find in pornography is precisely the repetition of the same: the clichés of pornography. There can be no real transgression, just an image that repeats itself. 

Mary Ellen Mark
[Photographer, b. 1940, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, d. 2015, New York.]

 If you are interested in photography because you love it and are obsessed with it, you must be self-motivated, a perfectionist, and relentless. 

Lewis Mumford
[Writer and critic, b. 1895, Flushing, New York, d. 1990, New York.]

 A picture was once a rare sort of symbol, rare enough to call for attentive concentration. Now it is the actual experience that is rare, and the picture has become ubiquitous.