Wright Morris
[Writer and photographer, b. 1910, Central City, Nebraska, d. 1998, Mill Valley, California.]

 [We] make images to see clearly: then we see clearly what we have made. 

Tina Modotti
[Photographer and political activist, b. 1896, Undine, Italy, d. 1942, Mexico City.]

 Always, when the words “art” and “artistic” are applied to my photographic work, I am disagreeably affected. This is due, surely, to the bad use and abuse made of those terms. I consider myself a photographer, nothing more. If my photographs differ from that which is usually done in this field, it is precisely because I try to produce not art but honest photographs, without distortions or manipulations. 

Marshall McLuhan
[Writer and theorist, b. 1911, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, d. 1980, Toronto, Canada.]

 The movie stars and matinee idols are put into the public domain by photography. They become dreams that money can buy. They can be bought and thumbed more easily than public prostitutes. 

Mariko Mori
[Artist and photographer, b. 1967, Tokyo, Japan, lives in New York.]

 I must create the world in order to breathe in the world; I don’t exist unless I create. 

Walter Benn Michaels
[Writer and critic, b. 1948, lives in Chicago.]

 What a [Cindy Sherman] photograph shows is an object that has been called into the world by the existence of cameras; the pose, as pose, calls attention to this fact and criticizes the world the camera has made; the camera, then, records this critique. 

Ray Metzker
[Photographer, b. 1931, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, d. 2014, Philadelphia.]

 Photographers are victims of paradox, tracking the impermanent to make it permanent. 

Roberta McGrath
[Critic, lives in Edinburgh, Scotland.]

 In his Day Books [Edward Weston] records how photographic sessions were frequently interrupted. The eye was replaced by the penis, making a photograph by making love. It is here we begin to see an oscillation between photography/sex, (between the print/the real). 

Richard Misrach
[Photographer, b. 1949, Los Angeles, lives in San Francisco.]

 The very act of representation has been so thoroughly challenged in recent years by postmodern theories that it is impossible not to see the flaws everywhere, in any practice of photography. Traditional genres in particular—journalism, documentary studies, and fine-art photography—have become shells, or forms emptied of meaning.