Abelardo Morell
[b. 1948, Havana, Cuba, lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.]

 There is a lot of social photography being done now to point to the untruth of photography. It’s getting very dull now. So, okay photography doesn’t tell the truth. So what? Everyone has known this forever. 

Martin Munkacsi
[Photographer, b. 1898, Kolozsvár, Hungary, (now Cluj-Napoca, Romania), d. 1963, New York.]

 Never pose your subjects. Let them move about naturally... All great photographs today are snapshots. (1935) 

Lisette Model
[Photographer, b. 1906, Vienna, Austria, d. 1983, New York.]

 I am a passionate lover of the snapshot, because of all photographic images it comes closest to truth. 

Samuel Morse
[Inventor and artist, b. 1791, Charlestown, Massachusetts, d. 1872, New York.]

 [The daguerreotype will] banish the sketchy, slovenly daubs that pass for spirited and learned; those works which possess mere general effect without detail, because, forsooth, detail destroys general effect. Nature, in the results of Daguerre’s process, has taken the pencil into her own hands, and she shows that the minutest detail disturbs not the general repose. (1839) 

Grant Mudford
[Photographer, b. 1944, Sydney, Australia, lives in Los Angeles.]

 I realized eventually that if I was really on top of what I was doing, I should be able to make photographs out of almost anything. 

Eadweard Muybridge (Edward James Muggeridge)
[Photographer, b. 1830, Kingston-on-Thames, England, d. 1904, Woking, England.]

 …we have become so accustomed to see [the galloping horse] in art that it imperceptibly dominated our understanding, and we think the representation to be unimpeachable, until we throw off all our preconceived impressions on one side, and seek the truth by independent observation from Nature herself. (1898) 

Walter Benn Michaels
[Writer and critic, b. 1948, lives in Chicago.]

 What a [Cindy Sherman] photograph shows is an object that has been called into the world by the existence of cameras; the pose, as pose, calls attention to this fact and criticizes the world the camera has made; the camera, then, records this critique. 

Abraham Maslow
[b. 1908, Brooklyn, New York, d. 1970, Menlo Park, California.]

 In a word, to perceive an object abstractly means not to perceive some aspects of it. It clearly implies selection of some attributes, rejection of other attributes, creation or distortion of still others. We make of it what we wish. We create it.