Gjon Mili
[Photographer, b. 1904, Korçë, Albania, d. 1984, Stamford, Connecticut.]

 Time could truly be made to stand still. Texture could be retained despite violent movement. (On the development of high-speed strobes) 

Lee Miller
[Photographer and model, b. 1907, Poughkeepsie, New York, d. 1976, Sussex, England.]

 [Being a great photojournalist is] a matter of getting out on a damn limb and sawing it off behind you. 

Eadweard Muybridge (Edward James Muggeridge)
[Photographer, b. 1830, Kingston-on-Thames, England, d. 1904, Woking, England.]

 …we have become so accustomed to see [the galloping horse] in art that it imperceptibly dominated our understanding, and we think the representation to be unimpeachable, until we throw off all our preconceived impressions on one side, and seek the truth by independent observation from Nature herself. (1898) 

Barbara Morgan
[Photographer, b. 1900, Buffalo, Kansas, d. 1992, North Tarrytown, New York.]

 Movement of contemporary life cannot be thought of without the machine. Our viewpoint is through a windshield, through reflected images on plate glass, blurred snatches through an elevator door. We watch quilted land patterns slowly shift far below our propeller blur, and the vibrating wing tip. Time is cogged, margins tightened, spirit is pressured. Pavement is a child's backyard and the moon is less familiar than a street lamp. If it takes a thief to catch a thief, the camera is the machine to catch the machine age. 

Thomas Mann
[Writer, b. 1875, Lübeck, Germany, d. 1955, Zurich, Switzerland.]

 The process of decay was forestalled by the powers of the light-ray, the flesh in which he walked disintegrated, annihilated, dissolved in vacant mist, and there within it was the finely turned skeleton of his own hand, the seal ring he had inherited from his grandfather hanging loose and black on the joint of his ring-finger—a hard, material object with which man adorns the body that is fated to melt away beneath it, when it passes on to another flesh that can wear it yet a little while. 

Bruce Mau
[Graphic designer and theorist,, b. 1959, Sudbury, Canada, lives in Toronto, Canada.]

 What is the focus of the new image infrastructure? Attention. It’s all designed for capturing, tracking, quantifying, manipulating, holding, buying, selling and controlling attention. 

Henri Matisse
[Artist, b. 1869, Le Cateau-Cambrésis, France, d. 1954, Nice, France.]

 Photographs will always be impressive because they show us nature, and all artists will find in them a world of sensations. The photographer must therefore intervene as little as possible, so as not to cause photography to lose the objective charm which it naturally possesses, notwithstanding its defects. 

Thomas Merton
[Writer, monk, and philosopher, b. 1915, Prades, France, d. 1968, Bangkok, Thailand.]

 ... Nothing resembles reality less than the photograph. Nothing resembles substance less than its shadow. To convey the meaning of something substantial you have to use not a shadow but a sign, not the limitation but the image. The image is a new and different reality, and of course it does not convey an impression of some object, but the mind of the subject; and that is something else again.