Groucho Marx
[Comedian and performer, b. 1890, New York, d. 1977, Los Angeles.]

 I don’t have a photograph, but you can have my footprints. They’re upstairs in my socks. (As Hugo Z. Hackenbush in the film A Day at the Races) 

Roberta McGrath
[Critic, lives in Edinburgh, Scotland.]

 In his Day Books [Edward Weston] records how photographic sessions were frequently interrupted. The eye was replaced by the penis, making a photograph by making love. It is here we begin to see an oscillation between photography/sex, (between the print/the real). 

Abraham Maslow
[b. 1908, Brooklyn, New York, d. 1970, Menlo Park, California.]

 In a word, to perceive an object abstractly means not to perceive some aspects of it. It clearly implies selection of some attributes, rejection of other attributes, creation or distortion of still others. We make of it what we wish. We create it. 

Duane Michals
[Photographer, b. 1932, McKeesport, Pennsylvania, lives in New York.]

 I believe in the invisible. I do not believe in the definitive reality of things around us. For me, reality is the intuition and the imagination and the quiet voice inside my head that says: isn’t that extraordinary? The things in our lives are the shadows of reality, just as we ourselves are shadows. 

Gordon Matta-Clark
[Artist, b. 1942, New York, d. 1978, New York.]

 I like the idea that the sacred photo framing process is equally “violatible” and I think that’s partly a carryover from the way I deal with structures to the way I deal with photography. 

Lee Miller
[Photographer and model, b. 1907, Poughkeepsie, New York, d. 1976, Sussex, England.]

 [Being a great photojournalist is] a matter of getting out on a damn limb and sawing it off behind you. 

Walter Benn Michaels
[Writer and critic, b. 1948, lives in Chicago.]

 What a [Cindy Sherman] photograph shows is an object that has been called into the world by the existence of cameras; the pose, as pose, calls attention to this fact and criticizes the world the camera has made; the camera, then, records this critique. 

Annette Messager
[Artist, b. 1943, Berck-sur-Mer, France, lives in Paris.]

 I have always believed that somehow the less we reveal the more the other desires to see.