John Baldessari
[Artist, b. 1931, National City, California, lives in Venice, California.]

 Probably I was never going to get out of National City, so I was going to show people what it’s like, to make art out of where I lived without glamorizing it, and with the idea that truth is beautiful, no matter how ugly it is. I drove around in the car shooting my pictures from the window, because I didn’t want to make the place more beautiful by setting my camera up with a tripod, getting the right light, and just the right composition. I wanted it just the way it is. 

Doug Aitken
[Artist, b. 1968, Redondo Beach, California, lives in Los Angeles.]

 I really like the idea of banality and repetition being used to generate the image, which are simple and unobstructed and not captivated by composition. 

Walker Evans
[Photographer, b. 1903, St. Louis, Missouri, d. 1975, New Haven, Connecticut.]

 I don’t think very much about [composition] consciously, but I’m very aware of it unconsciously, instinctively. Deliberately discard it every once in a while not to be artistic. Composition is a schoolteacher’s word. Any artist composes. I prefer to compose originally, naturally rather than self-consciously. Form and composition both are terribly important. 

John Baldessari
[Artist, b. 1931, National City, California, lives in Venice, California.]

 Probably one of the worst things to happen to photography is that cameras have viewfinders. 

Stephen Shore
[Photographer, b. 1947, New York, lives in New York.]

 A photograph has edges, the world does not. 

Anders Petersen
[Photographer, b. 1944, Solna, Sweden, lives in Stockholm.]

 I don’t care so much about form. Perhaps I did in the beginning, a long time ago. But now I just want to be as straight and simple and as true as possible. 

Robert Rauschenberg
[Artist, b. 1925, Port Arthur, Texas, d. 2008, Captiva Island, Florida.]

 You wait until life is in the frame, then you have the permission to click. I like the adventure of waiting until the whole frame is full. 

Rosalind Krauss
[Writer, critic, and historian, b. 1941, Washington, D.C., lives in New York.]

 Photographic cropping is always experienced as a rupture in the continuous fabric of reality. 
quotes 1-8 of 113
page 1 of 15 next page last page
display quotes