Lewis Baltz
[Photographer, b. 1945, Newport Beach, California, d. 2014, Paris.]

 …the questioning of the photograph in its relation to the reality, the interrogation of representation, the famous crisis of representation, really all took place before digital technology. Digital technology, you see, is not the villain here. (1998) 

Susie Linfield
[Writer and critic, New York, lives in New York.]

 On the Internet all photographs are equal: including doctored, manipulated, or constructed photographs, and those without any meaningful—or with entirely false—contexts. 

Bill Jay
[Photographer, writer, and curator, b. 1940, Maidenhead, England, d. 2009, Samara, Costa Rica.]

 Photoshop makes it easier to do all the things you didn’t need to do before Photoshop. 

Gregory Crewdson
[Photographer, b. 1962, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New Haven Connecticut.]

 … in this age of Instagram, and pictures on cell phones, and social media, it’s a real challenge to think of the photograph still meaning something important. 

Andy Grundberg
[Critic, curator, and educator, lives in Washington, D.C.]

 Computer images, like camera images today, will be seen as representations of a simulated, second-degree reality with little or no connection to the unmediated world. This is one lesson we can learn from photographs, and especially from those of the last 25 years: images exist not to be believed, but to be interrogated. 

Stephen Shore
[Photographer, b. 1947, New York, lives in New York.]

 I went on to Flickr and it was just thousands of pieces of shit, and I just couldn’t believe it. And it’s just all conventional, it’s all cliches, it’s just one visual convention after another. 

Errol Morris
[Documentary filmmaker, b. 1948, Hewlett, New York, lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 People often trust low-res images because they look more real. But of course they are not more real, just easier to fake… You never see a 10-megapixel photograph of Big Foot or the Abominable Snowman or the Loch Ness Monster. 

Jean Baudrillard
[Writer and theorist, b. 1929, Reims, France, d. 2007, Paris.]

 Digital production erases the image as analogon; it erases the real as something capable of being ‘imagined’. 
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