Jean Baudrillard
[Writer and theorist, b. 1929, Reims, France, d. 2007, Paris.]

 …the photograph that has become digital [is] liberated at a single stroke from both the negative and the real world. 

Lewis Baltz
[Photographer, b. 1945, Newport Beach, California, d. 2014, Paris.]

 …the questioning of the photograph in its relation to the reality, the interrogation of representation, the famous crisis of representation, really all took place before digital technology. Digital technology, you see, is not the villain here. (1998) 

Gregory Crewdson
[Photographer, b. 1962, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New Haven Connecticut.]

 … in this age of Instagram, and pictures on cell phones, and social media, it’s a real challenge to think of the photograph still meaning something important. 

David Maisel
[Photographer, b. 1961, New York, lives in San Francisco.]

 The limits of photography have always existed in a changing, fluid dynamic form. Cameras, lenses, papers, films, and, yes, digital technologies come and go. They are the current on which photography rides, but not the substance of what makes a photograph a worthy work of art. 

Jonathan Green
[Writer, photographer, and curator, b. 1939, lives in Riverside, California.]

 Henri Cartier-Bresson’s “decisive moment” has been reinvented as the digital moment, a seamless presentation of constellations of separate, singular occurrences brought together into a coherent, seemingly “photographic” whole. 

Martha Rosler
[Artist, b. 1943, Brooklyn, New York, lives in New York.]

 The question at hand is the danger posed to truth by computer-manipulated photographic imagery. How do we approach this question in a period in which the veracity of even the straight, unmanipulated photograph has been under attack for a couple of decades. 

Lev Manovich
[Artist, theorist, and critic, b. 1960, Moscow, lives in New York.]

 The digital image annihilates photography while solidifying, glorifying and immortalizing the photographic. 

Susie Linfield
[Writer and critic, New York, lives in New York.]

 The Abu Ghraib images—digital images, taken by amateurs—have strengthened, not undermined, the status of photographs as documents of the real. No written account of the tortures could have made such an impact. 
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