Albert Einstein
[Scientist, b. 1879, Ulm, Württemberg, Germany, d. 1955, Princeton, New Jersey.]

 I dislike every photograph taken of me. However, this one I dislike a little bit less. (On the portrait by Philippe Halsman, who he excluded from his normal characterization of photographers as Lichtaffen—“Light monkeys.”) 

Lady Elizabeth Eastlake (Elizabeth Rigby)
[Writer and photographer, b. 1809, London, d. 1893, London.]

 Our chief object at present is to investigate the connexion of photography with art—to decide how far the sun may be considered an artist... (1857) 

Mary Beth Edelson
[Artist and feminist activist, b. 1935, East Chicago, Indiana, lives in New York.]

 The camera is in fact usually the only witness to my private rituals—the best of them have been when I am alone. 

Harold Edgerton
[Scientist, inventor, and photographer, b. 1903, Fremont, Nebraska, d. 1990, Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 In many ways, unexpected results are what have most inspired my photography. 

Paul Éluard
[Writer, b. 1895, Sant-Denis, France, d. 1952, Charenton-le-Pont, France.]

 Seeing is understanding, judging, transforming, imagining, forgetting and being forgotten, being or disappearing. 

Nhem En
[Photographer, b. 1961, Kampong Leng, Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia, lives in Cambodia.]

 My only job was to photograph them, and it was someone else who tortured and killed these people. As a photographer, I had no right to beat, torture, or kill prisoners. I could not touch them. (En, official photographer at Khmer Rouge torture center Tuol Sleng, estimates he took photographs of 10,000 people arriving at the center. Eight survived.) 

Bill Eppridge
[Photographer, b. 1938, Buenos Aires, d. 2013, Danbury, Connecticut.]

 You are not just a photojournalist, you’re a historian. 

Steve Edwards
[Writer and photohistorian, lives in London.]

 There is nothing any more but surface. Representation is all there is and can ever be. There, simply, can be no outside to this endless round of meaningless meaning. What we experience as reality is, in reality, the reality effect. The age of a life beyond the image has gone forever. Now, all we can know are media projections, the beams of flickering images, and the whirr of tape heads.