Peter Henry Emerson
[Writer and photographer, b. 1856, LaPalma, Cuba, d. 1936, Falmouth, Cornwall, England.]

 It must not be forgotten that water-colour drawing and etching have both been despised in their time by artists, dealers, and the public, but they have lived to conquer for themselves places of honour. The promising boy, photography, is but fifty years old. What prophet will venture to cast his horoscope for the year 2000? (1889) 

Mary Beth Edelson
[Artist and feminist activist, b. 1935, East Chicago, Indiana, lives in New York.]

 The camera is in fact usually the only witness to my private rituals—the best of them have been when I am alone. 

Brian Eno
[Musician, composer, artist, b. 1948, Woodbridge, England, lives in Suffolk, England.]

 Whatever you now find weird, ugly, uncomfortable and nasty about a new medium will surely become its signature... The excitement of grainy film, of bleached-out black and white, is the excitement of witnessing events too momentous for the medium assigned to record them. 

Walker Evans
[Photographer, b. 1903, St. Louis, Missouri, d. 1975, New Haven, Connecticut.]

 ...nature photographs downright bore me for some reason or other. I think: “Oh, yes. Look at that sand dune. What of it?” 

Harold Edgerton
[Scientist, inventor, and photographer, b. 1903, Fremont, Nebraska, d. 1990, Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 In many ways, unexpected results are what have most inspired my photography. 

William Eggleston
[Photographer, b. 1939, Memphis, Tennessee, lives in Memphis.]

 We have a few things in common—smoking, drinking, and women. Photography just gets us out of the house. (To photographer Juergen Teller) 

Albert Einstein
[Scientist, b. 1879, Ulm, Württemberg, Germany, d. 1955, Princeton, New Jersey.]

 I dislike every photograph taken of me. However, this one I dislike a little bit less. (On the portrait by Philippe Halsman, who he excluded from his normal characterization of photographers as Lichtaffen—“Light monkeys.”) 

Bill Eppridge
[Photographer, b. 1938, Buenos Aires, d. 2013, Danbury, Connecticut.]

 There in front of me was the Senator on the floor being held by the busboy. There was nobody else around, and I made my first frame, and I forgot to focus the camera. The second frame was a little more in focus… then just for a second, while everything was open, the busboy looked up, and he had this look in his eye. I made that picture, and then suddenly the whole situation closed in again. And it became bedlam.(On the 1968 shooting of U.S. presidential candidate Bobby Kennedy.)