Nora Ephron
[Writer, b. 1941, New York, d. 2012, New York.]

 That [photographs] disturb readers is exactly as it should be: that’s why photojournalism is often more powerful than written journalism. 

Frederick H. Evans
[Photographer and bookseller, b. 1853, London, d. 1943, London.]

 Photography is photography; and in its purity and innocence is far too valuable and beautiful to be spoilt by making it imitate something else. (1908) 

Alfred Eisenstaedt
[Photographer, b. 1898, Dirschau, West Prussia (now Tczew, Poland), d. 1995, New York.]

 When I have a camera in my hand, I know no fear. 

Albert Einstein
[Scientist, b. 1879, Ulm, Württemberg, Germany, d. 1955, Princeton, New Jersey.]

 I dislike every photograph taken of me. However, this one I dislike a little bit less. (On the portrait by Philippe Halsman, who he excluded from his normal characterization of photographers as Lichtaffen—“Light monkeys.”) 

Steve Edwards
[Writer and photohistorian, lives in London.]

 There is nothing any more but surface. Representation is all there is and can ever be. There, simply, can be no outside to this endless round of meaningless meaning. What we experience as reality is, in reality, the reality effect. The age of a life beyond the image has gone forever. Now, all we can know are media projections, the beams of flickering images, and the whirr of tape heads. 

Lady Elizabeth Eastlake (Elizabeth Rigby)
[Writer and photographer, b. 1809, London, d. 1893, London.]

 Every individual who launches his happiness on this stream [of photography] finds currents and rocks not laid down in the chart. Every sanguine little couple who set up a glass-house at the commencement of summer, call their friends about them, and toil alternately in broiling light and stifling gloom, have said before long, in their hearts, “Photography, thy name is disappointment!” (1857) 

Frederick Engels, Karl Marx
[Political philosopher, b. 1818, Barmen, Germany, d. 1895, London.]
[Political philosophers, b. 1818, Trier, Germany, d. 1883, London.]

 If in all ideology men and their circumstances appear upside-down as in a camera obscura, this phenomenon arises just as much from their historical life-process as the inversion of objects on the retina does from the physical life-process. 

Brian Eno
[Musician, composer, artist, b. 1948, Woodbridge, England, lives in Suffolk, England.]

 Whatever you now find weird, ugly, uncomfortable and nasty about a new medium will surely become its signature... The excitement of grainy film, of bleached-out black and white, is the excitement of witnessing events too momentous for the medium assigned to record them.