George Eastman
[Inventor and industrialist, b. 1854, Waterville, New York, d. 1932, Rochester, New York.]

 Light makes photography. Embrace light. Admire it. Love it. But above all, know light. 

Bill Eppridge
[Photographer, b. 1938, Buenos Aires, d. 2013, Danbury, Connecticut.]

 There in front of me was the Senator on the floor being held by the busboy. There was nobody else around, and I made my first frame, and I forgot to focus the camera. The second frame was a little more in focus… then just for a second, while everything was open, the busboy looked up, and he had this look in his eye. I made that picture, and then suddenly the whole situation closed in again. And it became bedlam.(On the 1968 shooting of U.S. presidential candidate Bobby Kennedy.) 

Paul Éluard
[Writer, b. 1895, Sant-Denis, France, d. 1952, Charenton-le-Pont, France.]

 Seeing is understanding, judging, transforming, imagining, forgetting and being forgotten, being or disappearing. 

Walker Evans
[Photographer, b. 1903, St. Louis, Missouri, d. 1975, New Haven, Connecticut.]

 When you say “documentary,” you have to have a sophisticated ear to receive that word. It should be documentary style, because documentary is police photography of a scene and a murder ... that’s a real document. You see, art is really useless, and a document has use. And therefore, art is never a document, but it can adopt that style. I do it. I’m called a documentary photographer. But that presupposes a quite subtle knowledge of this distinction. 

Frederick Engels, Karl Marx
[Political philosopher, b. 1818, Barmen, Germany, d. 1895, London.]
[Political philosophers, b. 1818, Trier, Germany, d. 1883, London.]

 If in all ideology men and their circumstances appear upside-down as in a camera obscura, this phenomenon arises just as much from their historical life-process as the inversion of objects on the retina does from the physical life-process. 

Peter Henry Emerson
[Writer and photographer, b. 1856, LaPalma, Cuba, d. 1936, Falmouth, Cornwall, England.]

 “A photograph,” it has been said, “shows the art of nature rather that the art of the artist.” This is mere nonsense, as the same remark might by applied equally to all the fine arts. Nature does not jump into the camera, focus itself, expose itself, develop itself, and print itself. (1889) 

Harold Edgerton
[Scientist, inventor, and photographer, b. 1903, Fremont, Nebraska, d. 1990, Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 If you don’t wake up at three in the morning and want to do something, you’re wasting your time. 

Ralph Waldo Emerson
[Writer and thinker, b. 1803, Boston, Massachusetts, d. 1882, Concord, Massachusetts.]

 No man quarrels with his shadow, nor will he when the sun was the painter. Here is no interference, and the distortions are not the blunders of an artist.