Emile Zola
[Writer, b. 1840, Paris, France, d. 1902, Paris.]

 In my view you cannot claim to have seen something until you have photographed it. 

Inez Van Lamsweerde
[Photographer, b. 1963, Amsterdam, Netherlands, lives in Amsterdam.]

 My works have nothing to do with reality. I am not interested in a version of daily reality. The works show a new mental world. 

William Henry Jackson
[Photographer, b. 1843, Keesville, New York, d. 1942, New York.]

 Portrait photography never had any charms for me, so I sought my subjects from the house-tops, and finally from the hill-tops and about the surrounding country; the taste strengthening as my successes became greater in proportion to the failures. 

Bob Dylan (Robert Zimmerman)
[Singer, songwriter, and artist, b. 1941, Hibbing, Minnesota, lives in Malibu, California.]

 It rubs me the wrong way, a camera... It’s a frightening thing. Cameras make ghosts out of people. 

Ernst Haas
[Photographer, b. 1921, Vienna, Austria, d. 1986, New York City.]

 All I wanted was to connect my moods with those of Paris. Beauty pains and when it pained most, I shot. 

Laurel Nakadate
[Video artist and photographer, b. 1975, Austin, Texas, lives in New York.]

 Sometimes, photographs live in our hearts as unborn ghosts and we survive not because their shadows find permanence there, but because that thing that is larger than us, larger than the things we can point to, remember and claim, escorts us from dark into light... 

Judy Fiskin
[Photographer, b. 1945, Chicago, lives in Los Angeles.]

 In my work, the information is the least important part. It’s there, and the work wouldn’t mean the same thing without it, but it isn’t structured around the information. The most interesting part to me is the visual play... looking at this little universe of representation that I can make out of the world. 

Kansuke Yamagata
[Photographer and poet, b. 1914, Nagoya, Japan, d. 1987, Nagoya.]

 [Experimental] photography—unlike a knife or fountain pen—has no practical use or function. We can locate the rationale for photography’s superiority in its total lack of purpose, complete uselessness, and absolute meaninglessness.