Paul Cezanne
[Artist, b. 1839, Aix-en-Provence, France, d. 1906, Aix, France.]

 Everything is about to disappear. You’ve got to hurry up if you still want to see things. 

Eve Arnold
[Photographer, b. 1913, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, d. 2011, London.]

 I didn’t want to be a “woman photographer.” That would limit me. I wanted to be a photographer who was a woman, with all the world open to my camera. 

Ruth Orkin
[Photographer, b. 1921, Boston, Massachusetts, d. 1985, New York.]

 To be a photojournalist takes experience, skill, endurance, energy, salesmanship, organization, wheedling, climbing, gatecrashing, etc. – plus an eye and patience. 

E.B. White
[Writer, b. 1899, Mount Vernon, New York, d. 1985, North Brooklin, Maine.]

 Of course, it may be that the arts of writing and photography are antithetical. The hope and aim of a word-handler is that he may communicate a thought or an impression to his reader without the reader’s realizing that he has been dragged through a series of hazardous or grotesque syntactical situations. In photography the goal seems to be to prove beyond a doubt that the cameraman, in his great moment of creation, was either hanging by his heels from the rafters or was wedged under the floor with his lens in a knothole. 

Joseph Nicéphore Niépce
[One of the originators of photography, b. 1765, Chalon-sur-Saône, France, d. 1833, Gras, France.]

 The discovery I have made and which I call Heliography, consists in reproducing spontaneously, by the action of light, with gradations of tints from black to white, the images received in the camera obscura. 

Vik Muniz
[Artist, b. 1961, Sao Paulo, Brazil, lives in New York.]

 Now that photography is a digital medium, the ghost of painting is coming to haunt it: photography no longer retains a sense of truth. I think that's great, because it frees photography from factuality, the same way photography freed painting from factuality in the mid-nineteenth century. 

Paul Simon
[Musician, b. 1941, Newark, New Jersey, lives in New York.]

 She said the man in the gabardine suit was a spy
I said “Be careful his bowtie is really a camera” 

Juergen Teller
[Photographer, b. 1964, Erlangen, Germany, lives in London.]

 This beauty ideal is everywhere. You can’t escape it—TV, wallpaper, posters, billboards, magazines. They put on these crazy perceptions about what people should look like. It’s really shocking the way everybody is striving for this one thing, this ultimate beauty, but what is it?