Mary Beth Edelson
[Artist and feminist activist, b. 1935, East Chicago, Indiana, lives in New York.]

 The camera is in fact usually the only witness to my private rituals—the best of them have been when I am alone. 

Iké Udé
[Artist, b. 1964, Lagos, Nigeria, lives in New York.]

 Mass media is anything but superficial. Mass media is real: it’s too omnipotent to be trivial. The film and fashion industries hold enormous sway over people’s psyches, far more than the arts. I think that using mass media forms shows that anyone can make a magazine cover or a film poster, that these images weren’t etched in stone, that it was people who made them. So the main point is to denaturalize these images that serve as a source of anxiety. 

Gabriel Orozco
[Artist, b. 1962, Jalapa, Veracruz, Mexico, lives in New York, Paris, and Mexico City.]

 Photography is more than a window for me. Photography is more like a “space” that tries to capture situations. 

Wang Qingsong
[Photographer, b. 1966, Jinzhou, Hubei Province, China, lives in Beijing.]

 In my work I address the Chinese endeavor for modernization and the conflicts that occur when we encounter foreign cultures, tastes, and influences. 

Loretta Lux
[Photographer, b. 1969, Dresden, Germany, lives in Dublin, Ireland.]

 I trained as a painter, and I still love painting, but eventually I became aware that the physical aspect of painting didn’t really suit me. I didn’t enjoy working in the medium. It’s very messy. I prefer to have it clean, with a nice computer. 

Kermit the Frog
[Muppet and Philosopher, b. 1955, WRC-TV, Washington, D.C., lives in Hollywood.]

 How important are the visual arts in our society? I feel strongly that the visual arts are of vast and incalculable importance. Of course I could be prejudiced. I am a visual art. 

Anthony Hernandez
[Photographer, b. 1947, Los Angeles, lives in Los Angeles.]

 My work may be beautiful or it might not be, that just isn’t what I am concerned with. I try to be open and face the city... To me it’s not unpleasant or unbeautiful, it’s just life—which has to be threatening sometimes if it is going to be interesting. 

Bea Nettles
[Photographer, b. 1946, Gainesville, Florida, lives in Asheville, North Carolina.]

 I feel that rather than “taking” photographs, I am making them. I freely use any materials to make my images... thread, dust, cloth, plastic, pencil, mirrors, as well as my photographic paper and film. I’m trying to stretch and share the limits of my imagination: that is why and how I continue to work.