R. Crumb
[Cartoonist, b. 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, lives in Sauve, France.]

 They were just snapshots, nothing special, nothing particularly artistic. They were used for utility purposes.
(On photographs of mundane streetscapes he had “Stanley Something-or-other” take in Sacramento in 1988 to serve as backgrounds to his cartoons. “People don’t draw it, all this crap, people don’t focus attention on it because it’s ugly, it’s bleak, it’s depressing... But, this is the world we live in; I wanted my work to reflect that, the background reality of urban life.”) 

Linda Connor
[Photographer, b. 1944, New York, lives in San Anselmo, California.]

 I am deeply interested in how to get photography which so handily describes the facts of our world, to also move our spirits closer to the silent places where other realities and mysteries reside. 

Eileen Cowin
[Photographer, b. 1947, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Santa Monica, California.]

 The photograph as metaphor suggests many possible readings, blending memory, fantasy, and desire. As in film, the lines between fantasy and reality are blurred. 

John Coplans
[Artist, critic, and curator, b. 1920, London, d. 2003, New York.]

 The principal thing is the question of how our culture views age: that old is ugly. Take a photographer like Mapplethorpe. Every single photograph of his is about classical notions of beauty, of young beautiful black men, young beautiful women, and he selects subjects who are essentially interesting and good-looking and extremely physical. I can’t stand them. 

John Currin
[Artist, b. 1962, Boulder, Colorado, lives in New York.]

 I’ve always found paintings of nudes depressing because they can’t compete with photographs. The grainiest photograph of some girl, a blurry Polaroid—you’d rather look at that than the Venus de Milo, because you think, “Wow, that’s really somebody... This camera really was in front of this real naked lady.” 

Julia Margaret Cameron
[Photographer, b. 1815, Calcutta, India, d. 1879, Kalutara, Ceylon.]

 What is focus and who has the right to say what focus is the legitimate focus? (1864) 

Peter Conrad
[Critic, b. 1948, Hobart, Tasmania, lives in Oxford, England.]

 The camera is a killing chamber, which speeds up the time it claims to be conserving. Like coffins exhumed and prised open, the photographs put on show what we were and what we will be again. 

Jo Ann Callis
[Photographer, b. 1940, Cincinnati, Ohio, lives in Los Angeles.]

 I photographed models, but all of them, female or male, are me. It’s coming from me. My insecurities, my revenge, my disappointment.