Paul Cezanne
[Artist, b. 1839, Aix-en-Provence, France, d. 1906, Aix, France.]

 Everything is about to disappear. You’ve got to hurry up if you still want to see things. 

R. Crumb
[Cartoonist, b. 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, lives in Sauve, France.]

 They were just snapshots, nothing special, nothing particularly artistic. They were used for utility purposes.
(On photographs of mundane streetscapes he had “Stanley Something-or-other” take in Sacramento in 1988 to serve as backgrounds to his cartoons. “People don’t draw it, all this crap, people don’t focus attention on it because it’s ugly, it’s bleak, it’s depressing... But, this is the world we live in; I wanted my work to reflect that, the background reality of urban life.”) 

Eileen Cowin
[Photographer, b. 1947, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Santa Monica, California.]

 The photograph as metaphor suggests many possible readings, blending memory, fantasy, and desire. As in film, the lines between fantasy and reality are blurred. 

Julio Cortázar
[Writer, b. 1914, Brussels, Belgium, d. 1984, Paris, France.]

 ...to be only the lens of my camera, something fixed, rigid, incapable of intervention. 

John Coplans
[Artist, critic, and curator, b. 1920, London, d. 2003, New York.]

 The principal thing is the question of how our culture views age: that old is ugly. Take a photographer like Mapplethorpe. Every single photograph of his is about classical notions of beauty, of young beautiful black men, young beautiful women, and he selects subjects who are essentially interesting and good-looking and extremely physical. I can’t stand them. 

Paul Caponigro
[Photographer, b. 1932, Boston, Massachusetts, lives in Cushing, Maine.]

 We always point the lens both outward and inward. 

Maurizio Cattelan
[Artist, b. 1960, Padova, Italy, lives in New York.]

 I do not know exactly why, but it seems to me that images do not belong to anybody but are instead there, at the disposal of all. 

Charlotte Cotton
[Curator and author, b. 1981, Cotswolds, England, lives in London.]

 The fault line is the idea, that if it is about an idea, having twelve doesn’t make them any better.