Fidel Castro
[Dictator, b. 1926, Mayari, Cuba, lives in Havana.]

 We are very sorry that we didn’t have a photographer with us during the revolutionary war or during the first years of struggle, while we were underground, or during the advance to Moncada. We should have taken some photographs but we didn’t think about it... We would have loved it if only an amateur had photographed us. Even Che, who was an amateur photographer and liked to try almost everything, didn’t have a camera with him at the time... Now, after almost thirty years, you feel sadness and regret for not carrying a camera with which you could have taken the pictures that would now speak for themselves. On those occasions, as on so many others, it is only after time passes that people realize that they have been through historical moments that will never be repeated, and that the memory fades. 

Eileen Cowin
[Photographer, b. 1947, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Santa Monica, California.]

 The photograph as metaphor suggests many possible readings, blending memory, fantasy, and desire. As in film, the lines between fantasy and reality are blurred. 

Italo Calvino
[Writer, b. 1923, Santiago de la Vegas, Cuba, d. 1985, Siena, Italy.]

 Whatever person you decide to photograph, or whatever thing, you must go on photographing it always, exclusively, at every hour of the day and night. 

Charlotte Cotton
[Curator and author, b. 1981, Cotswolds, England, lives in London.]

 We are not only a civilization of amateur photographers; we are amateur curators, editors, and publishers. 

James Casebere
[Photographer, b. 1953, Lansing, Michigan, lives in New York.]

 The novels by Latin American magical realists showed how history is rewritten by each successive military dictatorship. I look at photography the same way: as a fiction, as representative of a particular point of view. 

Jane Welsh Carlyle
[Writer, b. 1801, Haddington, Scotland, d. 1866, London, England.]

 Blessed be the inventor of photography! I set him above even the inventor of chloroform! It has given more positive pleasure to poor suffering humanity than anything else that has cast up in my time or is like to—this art by which even the poor can possess themselves of tolerable likenesses of their absent dear ones. And mustn’t it be acting favourably on the morality of the country? (1859) 

Anthony Aziz, Sammy Cucher

 Through developments in digital technology, photography has been freed once and for all from the rigid conventions of Realism. Like life itself, it is not capable of representing not just what is real, but what is possible. 

Douglas Coupland
[Writer, b. 1961, Baden-Söllingen, Germany, lives in Vancouver, Canada.]

 I tried to think of a witty play on “Every picture tells a thousand words,” but then the whole word/picture thing collapsed on me.