John Coplans
[Artist, critic, and curator, b. 1920, London, d. 2003, New York.]

 The principal thing is the question of how our culture views age: that old is ugly. Take a photographer like Mapplethorpe. Every single photograph of his is about classical notions of beauty, of young beautiful black men, young beautiful women, and he selects subjects who are essentially interesting and good-looking and extremely physical. I can’t stand them. 

Larry Clark
[Photographer and filmmaker, b. 1943, Tulsa, Oklahoma, lives in New York.]

 I always wished I could be a painter or a filmmaker, anything but a fucking photographer. I certainly didn’t want to be in a photography gallery. 

Chuck Close
[Artist, b. 1940, Monroe, Washington, lives in New York.]

 I’ve always thought that problem solving is highly overrated and that problem creation is far more interesting. 

Stanley Cavell
[Philosopher, b. 1926, Atlanta, Georgia, lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.]

 Under examination by the camera, a human body becomes for its inhabitant a field of betrayal more than a ground of communication, and the camera’s further power is manifested as it documents the individual’s self-conscious efforts to control the body each time it is conscious of the camera’s attention to it. 

Edward Curtis
[Photographer and ethnographer, b. 1868, Whitewater, Wisconsin, d. 1952, Los Angeles.]

 To the oft-asked question, “What camera or lens do you use?” I can only reply “I couldn’t tell to save my soul—it is enough for me to know that I have something that will make pictures and that it is in working order.” 

Hart Crane
[Poet and writer, b. 1899, Garrettsville, Ohio, d. 1932, ocean off the Florida coast.]

 [The essences of things] are suspended on the invisible dimension whose vibrance has been denied the human eye at all times save in the intuition of ecstasy. 

Linda Connor
[Photographer, b. 1944, New York, lives in San Anselmo, California.]

 I am deeply interested in how to get photography which so handily describes the facts of our world, to also move our spirits closer to the silent places where other realities and mysteries reside. 

Cornell Capa (Kornél Friedmann)
[Writer and photographer, b. 1918, Budapest, Hungary, d. 2008, New York.]

 The idea that any photography can’t be personal is madness! ... I see something; it goes through my eye, heart, guts; I choose the subject. What could be more personal than that?