Ernest Cole (Ernest Levi Tsoloane Kole)
[Photographer, chronicler of Apartheid, b. 1940, Eersterust, South Africa, d. 1990, New York.]

 Cole
Photographer
(Total inscription on the stone slab covering Cole’s grave at Mamelodi cemetery, Tshwane, South Africa.)  

William Claxton
[Photographer, b. 1927, Pasadena, California, d. 2008, Los Angeles.]

 … jazz and photography have always come together for me. They’re alike in their improvisation and their spontaneousness. 

Linda Connor
[Photographer, b. 1944, New York, lives in San Anselmo, California.]

 I am deeply interested in how to get photography which so handily describes the facts of our world, to also move our spirits closer to the silent places where other realities and mysteries reside. 

Peter Conrad
[Critic, b. 1948, Hobart, Tasmania, lives in Oxford, England.]

 The camera is a killing chamber, which speeds up the time it claims to be conserving. Like coffins exhumed and prised open, the photographs put on show what we were and what we will be again. 

Edward Curtis
[Photographer and ethnographer, b. 1868, Whitewater, Wisconsin, d. 1952, Los Angeles.]

 To the oft-asked question, “What camera or lens do you use?” I can only reply “I couldn’t tell to save my soul—it is enough for me to know that I have something that will make pictures and that it is in working order.” 

Elinor Carcucci
[Photographer, b. 1971, Jerusalem, lives in New York.]

 People do things for the camera that knock me out, these strong, intense, revelatory things.... It’s like a little stage offered to you... But it doesn’t make it fake, it’s just a different process. 

Jane Welsh Carlyle
[Writer, b. 1801, Haddington, Scotland, d. 1866, London, England.]

 Blessed be the inventor of photography! I set him above even the inventor of chloroform! It has given more positive pleasure to poor suffering humanity than anything else that has cast up in my time or is like to—this art by which even the poor can possess themselves of tolerable likenesses of their absent dear ones. And mustn’t it be acting favourably on the morality of the country? (1859) 

Julio Cortázar
[Writer, b. 1914, Brussels, Belgium, d. 1984, Paris, France.]

 ...to be only the lens of my camera, something fixed, rigid, incapable of intervention.