Stanley Cavell
[Philosopher, b. 1926, Atlanta, Georgia, lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.]

 The development of fast film allowed the subjects of our photographs to be caught unawares, beyond our or their control. But they are nevertheless caught; the camera holds the last lanyard of control we would forgo. 

Julia Margaret Cameron
[Photographer, b. 1815, Calcutta, India, d. 1879, Kalutara, Ceylon.]

 I longed to arrest all beauty that came before me, and at length the longing has been satisfied. 

George Carlin
[Comedian and social critic, b. 1937, New York, d. 2008, Santa Monica, California.]

 I don’t own a camera, so I travel with a police sketch artist. 

Eleanor Callahan (née Knapp)
[Muse and model to husband Harry Callahan, b. 1916, Royal Oak, Michigan, d. 2012, Atlanta, Georgia.]

 He just liked to take the pictures of me. In every pose. Rain or shine. And whatever I was doing. If I was doing the dishes or if I was half asleep. And he knew that I never, never said no. I was always there for him. Because I knew that Harry would only do the right thing. 

Tee Corinne
[Photographer and artist, b. 1943, St. Petersburg, Florida, d. 2006, Sunny Valley, Oregon.]

 I’m interested in loving, beautiful, sexy images... I also want the images to be a turn on, create an adrenaline high, a rush of desire so intense that the act of looking is sexual. 

Elinor Carcucci
[Photographer, b. 1971, Jerusalem, lives in New York.]

 People do things for the camera that knock me out, these strong, intense, revelatory things.... It’s like a little stage offered to you... But it doesn’t make it fake, it’s just a different process. 

Peter Conrad
[Critic, b. 1948, Hobart, Tasmania, lives in Oxford, England.]

 The camera is a killing chamber, which speeds up the time it claims to be conserving. Like coffins exhumed and prised open, the photographs put on show what we were and what we will be again. 

Jean-François Chevrier
[Art historian, critic, and curator, b. 1954, Lyon, France, lives in Paris.]

 To look, to record, to inscribe, to reproduce, to imitate, to reveal, to imagine are for me the seven keys of photographic imagination.