Robert Kennedy
[Politician, b. 1925, Brookline, Massachusetts, d. 1968, Los Angeles, California.]

 I examined the pictures carefully, and what I saw appeared to be no more than the clearing of a field for a farm or the basement of a house. I was relieved to hear later that this was the same reaction of virtually everyone at the meeting, including President Kennedy. Even a few days later, when more work had taken place on the site, he remarked that it looked like a football field. (On aerial photographs that triggered the 1962 Cuban missile crisis.) 

Malcolm Browne
[Journalist and photographer, b. 1931, New York, d. 2012, New Hampshire.]

 I had no point of view. I was concerned that [the photographs] be properly exposed, but since the subject was self-illuminated that wasn’t much of a problem. (On his 1963 photograph of self-immolation of South Vietnamese Buddhist monk Thich Quang Duc.) 

Edmund Hillary
[Mountaineer, b. 1919, Tuakau, New Zealand, d. 2008, Auckland, New Zealand.]

 As far as I knew, he [Tenzing Norgay] had never taken a photograph before—and the summit of Everest was hardly the place to show him how. (On why there is a photo of Tenzing Norgay on the summit of Mount Everest during the first successful climb, but not one of Hillary.) 

Boris Yaro
[Photographer, b. 1938, lives in Northridge, California.]

 Let go, lady. Godammit, this is history! (Trying to get a clear shot of the dying Robert Kennedy.) 

Bert Stern
[Photographer, b. 1929, Brooklyn, New York, d. 2013, New York.]

 ... her arm was up, like waving farewell. I saw what I wanted, I pressed the button, and she was mine. It was the last picture. (On photographing Marilyn Monroe six weeks before her death.) 

Robert Capa (Endre Ernő Friedmann)
[Photographer, b. 1913, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1954, Thai Binh, Vietnam.]

 I had it bad. The empty camera trembled in my hands. It was a new kind of fear shaking my body from toe to hair, and twisting my face. (Remembrance of landing on Omaha Beach, D-Day.) 

Susie Linfield
[Writer and critic, New York, lives in New York.]

 The Abu Ghraib images—digital images, taken by amateurs—have strengthened, not undermined, the status of photographs as documents of the real. No written account of the tortures could have made such an impact. 

Sabrina Harman
[U.S. military guard at Abu Ghraib Prison, Iraq, b. 1978, Lorton, Virginia, lives in Virginia.]

 On June 23 I saw my first dead body I took pictures! The other day I heard my first grenade go off. Fun! (To her father, June 23, 2003, written from Abu Ghraib Prison, Iraq) 
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