Hunter Thompson
[Writer, b. 1937, Louisville, Kentucky, d. 2005, Woody Creek, Colorado.]

 These horrifying digital snapshots of the American dream in action on foreign soil are worse than anything even I could have expected. I have been in this business a long time and I have seen many staggering things, but this one is over the line. Now I am really ashamed to carry an American passport. (On photographs of Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq) 

Oliviero Toscani
[Photography, b. 1942, Milan, Italy, lives in Casale Marittimo, Tuscany, Italy.]

 A photograph permits a first viewing, and then an individual reflection. It solicits participation, and encourages individuality in interpretation. Television is an autarchy, a dictatorship. 

Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens)
[Writer, b. 1835, Hannibal, Missouri, d. 1910, Redding, Connecticut.]

 My dear Sir, I thank you very much for your letter and your photograph. In my opinion you are more like me than any other of my numerous doubles. I may even say that you resemble me more closely than I do myself. In fact, I intend to use your picture to shave by. Yours thankfully, S. Clemens. (Reply to a man who sent him a photograph and claimed to be his double.) 

Dylan Thomas
[Poet and writer, b. 1914, Swansea, South Wales, d. 1953, New York.]

 The photograph is married to the eye,
Grafts on its bride one sided skins of truth. 

George Trow
[Writer and critic, b. 1943, New York, d. 2006, Naples, Italy.]

 There was a time when photographers were thought to be socially secondary, and, hence, not dangerous. Lincoln was more important than Brady. It didn’t occur to anyone to worry about the manner in which a photograph was taken. 

Edwin Parker “Cy” Twombly
[Artist, b. 1928, Lexington, Virginia, d. 2011, Rome.]

 The Image cannot
be dis possessed of a
priMORdial
freshness
which IDEAS
CAN NEVER CLAIM 

Juergen Teller
[Photographer, b. 1964, Erlangen, Germany, lives in London.]

 This beauty ideal is everywhere. You can’t escape it—TV, wallpaper, posters, billboards, magazines. They put on these crazy perceptions about what people should look like. It’s really shocking the way everybody is striving for this one thing, this ultimate beauty, but what is it? 

Wolfgang Tillmans
[Photographer, b. 1968, Remscheid, Germany, lives in London.]

 I think it’s much more radical to see and show things as they look instead of making them somehow subversive through alienation or estrangement.