Joyce Tenneson
[Photographer, b. 1945, Weston, Massachusetts, lives in New York.]

 A true portrait can never hide the inner life of its subject. It is interesting that in our culture we hide and cover the body, yet our faces are naked. Through a person’s face we can potentially see everything—the history and depth of that person’s life as well as their connection to an even deeper universal presence. 

Spencer Tunick
[Artist, b. 1967, Middletow., New York, lives in New York.]

 There are some people over there with clothes, get them out of there! 

Charles Traub
[Photographer, writer, and critic, b. 1945, Louisville, Kentucky, lives in New York.]

 If it can be done digitally, do it. 

Pete Turner
[Photographer, b. 1934, Albany, New York, d. 2017, Long Island, New York.]

 A photographer’s work is given shape and style by his personal vision. It is not simply technique, but the way he looks at life and the world around him. 

Edwin Parker “Cy” Twombly
[Artist, b. 1928, Lexington, Virginia, d. 2011, Rome.]

 The Image cannot
be dis possessed of a
priMORdial
freshness
which IDEAS
CAN NEVER CLAIM 

Hunter Thompson
[Writer, b. 1937, Louisville, Kentucky, d. 2005, Woody Creek, Colorado.]

 These horrifying digital snapshots of the American dream in action on foreign soil are worse than anything even I could have expected. I have been in this business a long time and I have seen many staggering things, but this one is over the line. Now I am really ashamed to carry an American passport. (On photographs of Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq) 

Tristan Tzara (Sami Rosenstock)
[Writer and artist, b. 1896, Moineti, Bacu, Romania, d. 1963, Paris.]

 When everything that is called art was well and truly riddled with rheumatism, the photographer lit the thousands of candles whose power is contained in his flame, and the sensitive paper absorbed by degrees the blackness cut out of some ordinary object. He had invented a fresh and tender flash of lightning. 

Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens)
[Writer, b. 1835, Hannibal, Missouri, d. 1910, Redding, Connecticut.]

 ... No photograph ever was good, yet, of anybody—hunger and thirst and utter wretchedness overtake the outlaw who invented it! It transforms into desperadoes the weakest of men; depicts sinless innocence upon the pictured faces of ruffians; gives the wise man the stupid leer of a fool, and the fool an expression of more than earthly wisdom.