Hippolyte Taine
[Art critic and historian, b. 1828, Vouziers, Ardennes, France, d. 1893, Paris.]

 I wish to reproduce things as they are or as they would be even if I myself did not exist. 

John Tagg
[Writer, theorist, and photohistorian, b. 1949, North Shields, England, lives in Ithica, New York.]

 The transparency of the photograph is its most powerful rhetorical device. 

Charles Traub
[Photographer, writer, and critic, b. 1945, Louisville, Kentucky, lives in New York.]

 If it can be done digitally, do it. 

Joyce Tenneson
[Photographer, b. 1945, Weston, Massachusetts, lives in New York.]

 A true portrait can never hide the inner life of its subject. It is interesting that in our culture we hide and cover the body, yet our faces are naked. Through a person’s face we can potentially see everything—the history and depth of that person’s life as well as their connection to an even deeper universal presence. 

Peter Turnley
[Photographer, b. 1955, Fort Wayne, Indiana, lives in New York and Paris.]

 We hear a lot about the notion of objectivity, and I’m not sure I know what that is. I know what fairness is. I know what honesty is. And I know what the heart and emotions are. I think those are the things I particularly want to embrace. I would not want anyone to take away my right and my ability to communicate my feelings about the things that I see. 

Alfred Lord Tennyson
[Poet, b. 1809, Somersby, Lincolnshire, England, d. 1892, Aldwort, England.]

 I can’t be anonymous by reason of your confounded photographs. (To Julia Margaret Cameron) 

Spencer Tunick
[Artist, b. 1967, Middletow., New York, lives in New York.]

 I’m in between an installation artist, video artist and photographer. And when you work with nude bodies, you’re immediately called a pornographer or a fashion photographer. 

Florence Thompson
[Migrant mother, b. 1904, Oklahoma, d. 1983, Scotts Valley, California.]

 That’s my picture hanging all over the world, but I can’t get a penny out of it. What good’s it doing me? (Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother at 75 years of age living in a trailer park near where the famous photograph was taken and surviving on $331.60 monthly social security.)