Peter Turnley
[Photographer, b. 1955, Fort Wayne, Indiana, lives in New York and Paris.]

 We hear a lot about the notion of objectivity, and I’m not sure I know what that is. I know what fairness is. I know what honesty is. And I know what the heart and emotions are. I think those are the things I particularly want to embrace. I would not want anyone to take away my right and my ability to communicate my feelings about the things that I see. 

Lars Tunbjörk
[Photographer, b. 1956, Borås, Sweden, d. 2015, Stockholm.]

 I try to take photos like an alien, or a small child. 

Edmund Teske
[Photographer, b. 1911, Chicago, Illinois, d. 1996, Los Angeles.]

 Just as we have taken in words, we have taken in images... they are afloat within us... as they come out in different combinations, images made in different points in time also become, in a sense, timeless. 

Sergei Tretyakov
[Writer, critic, and artist, b. 1892, Guldiga, Russia (now Kuldigas, Latvia), d. 1939, Moscow.]

 If a more or less random snapshot is like an infinitely fine scale that has been scratched from the surface of reality with the tip of a finger, then in comparison the photoseries or photomontage lets us experience the extended massiveness of reality, its authentic meaning. We build systematically. We must also photograph systematically. Sequence and long-term photographic observation—that is the method. 

Joyce Tenneson
[Photographer, b. 1945, Weston, Massachusetts, lives in New York.]

 A true portrait can never hide the inner life of its subject. It is interesting that in our culture we hide and cover the body, yet our faces are naked. Through a person’s face we can potentially see everything—the history and depth of that person’s life as well as their connection to an even deeper universal presence. 

Alan Trachtenberg
[Writer and critic, b. b. 1932, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, lives in Hamden, Connecticut.]

 Somewhere between what the lens depicts and what the caption interprets, a mental picture intervenes, a cultural ideology defining what and how to see, what to recognize as significant. 

William Thackeray
[Writer, b. 1811, Calcutta, India, d. 1863, London.]

 The two most engaging powers of [a photographer] are to make new things familiar and familiar things new. 

Deborah Turbeville
[Photographer, b. 1932, Medford, Massachusetts, d. 2013, New York.]

 I destroy the image after I’ve made it, obliterate it a little so you never have it completely there.