Joyce Tenneson
[Photographer, b. 1945, Weston, Massachusetts, lives in New York.]

 A true portrait can never hide the inner life of its subject. It is interesting that in our culture we hide and cover the body, yet our faces are naked. Through a person’s face we can potentially see everything—the history and depth of that person’s life as well as their connection to an even deeper universal presence. 

Sergei Tretyakov
[Writer, critic, and artist, b. 1892, Guldiga, Russia (now Kuldigas, Latvia), d. 1939, Moscow.]

 Every young boy with a camera wages war against the easel painters, and every little reporter-factographer can turn his pen into a mortal weapon against literature. (1928) 

John Tagg
[Writer, theorist, and photohistorian, North Shields, England, lives in Ithica, New York.]

 [“Documentary” photography’s] unlikely and paradoxical mixture of social and psychological “truths,” exotic voyeurism, fetishised artistic subjectivity, and formalist claims to universality, which may once have appeared mutually enhancing, was contradictory and inherently unstable. 

Juergen Teller
[Photographer, b. 1964, Erlangen, Germany, lives in London.]

 This beauty ideal is everywhere. You can’t escape it—TV, wallpaper, posters, billboards, magazines. They put on these crazy perceptions about what people should look like. It’s really shocking the way everybody is striving for this one thing, this ultimate beauty, but what is it? 

Paul Theroux
[Writer, b. 1941, Medford, Massachusetts, lives in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and Haleiwa, Hawaii.]

 “I’ve never seen Marilyn like that before,” a critic once said to me. “That’s not Marilyn,” I said. “It’s a picture.” 

William Henry Fox Talbot
[Mathematician and pioneer of photography, b. 1800, Melbury, Dorset, England, d. 1877, Lacock Abbey, England.]

 [The camera] may be said to make a picture of whatever it sees, the object glass is the eye of the instrument—the sensitive paper may be compared to the retina. 

David Turnley
[Photographer, b. 1955, Fort Wayne, Indiana, lives in New York.]

 I do not see myself as a casual observer. I find myself as compelled by instances of joy—and by wanting to capture moments of joy, and beauty, and jubilation—as I am by more tragic moments. The human experience is one I look at very seriously, and I find myself driven to document it with genuine integrity. 

George Tice
[Photographer, b. 1938, Newark, New Jersey, lives in Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey.]

 When I take a photograph, I make a wish.