Ezra Pound
[Poet, b. 1885, Hailey, Idaho, d. 1972, Venice, Italy.]

 Almost any fool can paint an academy picture, and any imbecile can shoot off a Kodak. 

Jean Pigozzi
[Photographer, collector, and Fiat fortune heir, b. 1952, Paris, lives in Geneva.]

 The moment when I press the shutter is fantastic, orgasmic, so charged with the hope that this will be a great, original, interesting, and perfectly composed photo. But like any other exciting thing in life, it is usually spoiled by some ridiculous, unpredictable, and annoying detail. 

Sigmar Polke
[Painter and photographer, b. 1941, Oels, Silesia, Germany (Now Poland), d. 2010, Cologne, Germany.]

 It’s the procedures in and for themselves that interest me. The picture isn’t really necessary. 

Tod Papageorge
[Photographer, b. 1940, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, lives in New Haven, Connecticut.]

 Cameras are like dogs, but dumb, and toward quarry, even more faithful. They point, they render, and defy the photographer who hopes. 

Olivia Parker
[Photographer, b. 1941, Boston, Massachusetts, lives in Manchester, Massachusetts.]

 If you don’t love making photographs do something else. 

Sylvia Plachy
[Photographer, b. 1943, Budapest, Hungary, lives in New York.]

 Every photo is almost a fiction or a dream. If it’s really good, it’s another form of life. 

Jackson Pollock
[Artist, b. 1912, Cody, Wyoming, d. 1956, Springs, New York.]

 The modern artist is living in a mechanical age, and we have a mechanical means of representing objects in nature such as the camera and photograph. The modern artist [therefore], it seems to me is working and expressing an inner world, in other words expressing the energy, the motion, and other inner forces. (1950) 

Robert Polidori
[Photographer, b. 1951, Montréal, Canada, lives in New York.]

 Where you point the camera is the question and the picture you get is the answer to decipher.