Anders Petersen
[Photographer, b. 1944, Solna, Sweden, lives in Stockholm.]

 (Be wary of:
nicely formulated principles and truths.
useless feelings of guilt and sins of the past
or while we’re at it
a
photograph resembling pretty adjectives
on the other hand, I like private
diaries and family albums
 

Jackson Pollock
[Artist, b. 1912, Cody, Wyoming, d. 1956, Springs, New York.]

 The modern artist is living in a mechanical age, and we have a mechanical means of representing objects in nature such as the camera and photograph. The modern artist [therefore], it seems to me is working and expressing an inner world, in other words expressing the energy, the motion, and other inner forces. (1950) 

Sigmar Polke
[Painter and photographer, b. 1941, Oels, Silesia, Germany (Now Poland), d. 2010, Cologne, Germany.]

 It’s the procedures in and for themselves that interest me. The picture isn’t really necessary. 

Platon (Platon Rivellis)
[Photographer, b. 1968, London, lives in New York.]

 When I was shooting Karl Rove, I said to him, “Mr. Rove, I’m just a guy from England trying to make it in America. Can you give me any advice?” and he said to me, “Sonny, if you’re shooting me, you’ve already made it.” 

Joseph Pulitzer
[Editor, publisher and businessman, b. 1847, Makó, Hungary, d. 1911, Charleston, South Carolina.]

 They call me the father of illustrated journalism. What folly! I never thought any such thing. I had a small newspaper, which had been dead for years, and I was trying in every way to build up its circulation. What could I use for bait? A picture, of course. 

Robert Polidori
[Photographer, b. 1951, Montréal, Canada, lives in New York.]

 Where you point the camera is the question and the picture you get is the answer to decipher. 

Harold Pinter
[Playwright, b. 1930, London, d. 2008, London.]

 I might even show you my photograph album. You might even see a face in it which might remind you of your own, of what you once were. You might see faces of others, in shadow, or cheeks of others turning, or jaws, or backs of necks, or eyes, dark under hats, which might remind you of others, whom you once knew, whom you thought long dead, but from whom you will still receive a sidelong glance. 

Jean Pigozzi
[Photographer, collector, and Fiat fortune heir, b. 1952, Paris, lives in Geneva.]

 The moment when I press the shutter is fantastic, orgasmic, so charged with the hope that this will be a great, original, interesting, and perfectly composed photo. But like any other exciting thing in life, it is usually spoiled by some ridiculous, unpredictable, and annoying detail.