Kim Phúc
[Human being, subject of iconic photograph, b. 1963, Trang Bang, South Vietnam, lives in Ajax, Canada.]

 That photograph is more powerful than bombs. (On the photograph of her as a nine-year-old fleeing the village of Trang Bang, Vietnam after it was napalm bombed by the United States in 1972.) 

Irving Penn
[Photographer, b. 1917, Plainfield, New Jersey, d. 2009, New York.]

 I myself have always stood in the awe of the camera. I recognize it for the instrument it is, part Stradivarius, part scalpel. 

Neil Postman
[Writer and media critic, b. 1931, New York, d. 2003, Queens, New York.]

 By itself photography cannot deal with the unseen, the remote, the internal, the abstract, it does not speak of “Man,” only of “a man”; not of “Tree,” only “a tree.” 

Adrian Piper
[Artist, b. 1948, Harlem, New York, lives in Hyannis, Massachusetts.]

 Racism is a visual pathology. 

Joseph Pulitzer
[Editor, publisher and businessman, b. 1847, Makó, Hungary, d. 1911, Charleston, South Carolina.]

 They call me the father of illustrated journalism. What folly! I never thought any such thing. I had a small newspaper, which had been dead for years, and I was trying in every way to build up its circulation. What could I use for bait? A picture, of course. 

Tod Papageorge
[Photographer, b. 1940, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, lives in New Haven, Connecticut.]

 If your pictures are not good enough, you aren’t reading enough. 

Sean Penn
[Actor, b. 1960, Burbank, California, lives in Los Angeles.]

 I still think photographers should be lashed out at. They should be put in a cage where you can poke them with a stick for a quarter. But not in a hostile way, just for giggles. They really are on the attack against mankind; it’s a disease. They should be helped somewhere. But I’d still like to poke them with a stick. 

Donna-Lee Phillips
[Photographer and critic, b. 1941, Winthrop Massachusetts, lives in Eureka, California.]

 Structuring information is ideological activity.