Jerzy Kosinksi (Jerzy Lewinkopf)
[Writer, b. 1933, Lodz, Poland, d. 1991, New York.]

 He felt an excessive appeal to the sense of sight was insidious and debilitating, a specious claim to the reproduction of the world as it really was. He resisted the lulling implication that knowledge was above all what was to be seen, and refused the passive luxury of the spectator's chair, the flattening of reality, time arrested in one angle of vision. He suspected that to submit to that vision would be to clog the active play of images that were fluent and mobile within each person, fantasy and emotion that written language alone would quicken. 

Elke Krystufek
[Artist, b. 1970, Vienna, lives in Rotterdam and Vienna.]

 I decided to make my life a work of art. I have no private life. Everything is public. 

Kermit the Frog
[Muppet and Philosopher, b. 1955, WRC-TV, Washington, D.C., lives in Hollywood.]

 How important are the visual arts in our society? I feel strongly that the visual arts are of vast and incalculable importance. Of course I could be prejudiced. I am a visual art. 

Nick Knight
[Photographer, b. 1958, London, England, lives in London.]

 I think photography has been wrestling with a burden of telling the truth, which I don’t think it was ever particularly good at. 

Rosalind Krauss
[Writer, critic, and historian, b. 1941, Washington, D.C., lives in New York.]

 By exposing the multiplicity, the facticity, the repetition and stereotype at the heart of every aesthetic gesture, photography deconstructs the possibility of differentiating between the original and the copy. [Photography calls] into question the whole concept of the uniqueness of the art object, the originality of the author, the coherence of the oeuvre within which it was made, and the individuality of so-called self-expression. 

Mona Kuhn
[Photographer, b. 1969, São Paulo, Brazil, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The body is a place where our mind resides, and that’s what I’m photographing. 

Mark Klett
[Photographer, b. 1952, Albany, New York, lives in Tempe, Arizona.]

 So much of what we know, and what we think we know, about the land has first passed through someone's lens. The interesting thing is to make use of this history, not merely to be absorbed into it. For me, landscape photographs begin as the artifacts of personal moments. They get interesting when they become cultural commentary. 

Josef Koudelka
[Photographer, b. 1938, Biskovice, Moravia, Czechoslovakia, lives in Paris.]

 If I am dissatisfied, it’s simply because good photos are few and far between. A good photo is a miracle.