Antonin Kratochvil
[Photographer, b. 1947, Lovisice, Czechoslovakia, lives in New York.]

 I was repelled by the sleazy reality of the totalitarian countries: politicians were shameless. There were corruption, pollution, shoddy goods, long lines, and suicide everywhere, but the leaders kept boasting about their great achievements and bright tomorrows. I saw all this and tried to show it in my pictures as simply and straightforwardly as I could. All I wanted to do was record how all these poor people adapted to lies and suffering, how they got used to it, how, in fact they were bound to miss it when it was over. 

Søren Kierkegaard
[Philosopher, b. 1813, Copenhagen, Denmark, d. 1855, Copenhagen.]

 With the daguerreotype everyone will be able to have their portrait taken—formerly it was only the prominent; and at the same time everything is being done to make us all look exactly the same—so that we shall only need one portrait. 

André Kertész
[Photographer, b. 1894, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1985, New York.]

 I am an amateur and I intend to stay that way for the rest of my life. (1930) 

Nastassja Kinski
[Model and actress, b. 1959, West Berlin, Germany, lives in Los Angeles and Europe.]

 When I cannot get that moment of truth where you feel yourself opening up like a flower, I absolutely loathe the bloody camera. I can just feel this black hole eyeing me, sucking me in, and I feel like smashing it to smithereens. 

Seydou Keïta
[Photographer, b. circa 1921, Bamako, Mali, d. 2001, Paris.]

 ...my father gave me the land with the house behind the main prison. And that’s where I opened my studio. It's a place where no one wanted to live because of the “spirits” that threw stones in the night. Even today if you sleep in that house and you turn off the light a great gleaming white horse spirit might appear. 

Rudyard Kipling
[Writer, b. 1865, Bombay, India, d. 1936, London.]

 There aren’t twelve hundred people in the world who understand pictures. The others pretend and don’t care. 

Arthur Koestler
[Writer, b. 1905, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1983, London, England.]

 The thing represented had to pass through two distorting lenses: the artist’s mind, and his medium of expression, before it emerged as a man-made dream—the two, of course, being intimately connected and interacting with each other. 

Idris Khan
[Artist, b. 1978, Birmingham, England, lives in London.]

 A lot of people in the art world hate to use the word “Photoshop” like it’s cheating or easy or something. I say bollocks to that. For me, it’s my tool, my paintbrush if you like, and lets me create my own visual language.