Pierre Klossowski
[Writer, artist, "but first, foremost, and always, a monomaniac", b. 1905, Paris, d. 2001, Paris.]

 The very idea of the nude is only a neutralization of a primitive and violent act. 

Arthur Koestler
[Writer, b. 1905, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1983, London, England.]

 The thing represented had to pass through two distorting lenses: the artist’s mind, and his medium of expression, before it emerged as a man-made dream—the two, of course, being intimately connected and interacting with each other. 

Mark Klett
[Photographer, b. 1952, Albany, New York, lives in Tempe, Arizona.]

 Photos always seem to exist as sort of stuffy, unnecessary antiques that we put in a drawer—unless we take them out, put them in current dialogue, and give them relevance. 

Rudyard Kipling
[Writer, b. 1865, Bombay, India, d. 1936, London.]

 There aren’t twelve hundred people in the world who understand pictures. The others pretend and don’t care. 

Annette Kuhn
[Writer and theorist, lives in Lancaster, England.]

 A photograph can certainly throw you off the scent. You will get nowhere, for instance, by taking a magnifying glass to it to get a closer look: you will see only patches of light and dark, an unreadable mesh of grains. The image yields nothing to that sort of scrutiny; it simply disappears. In order to show what it is evidence of, a photograph must always point you away from itself. 

Antonin Kratochvil
[Photographer, b. 1947, Lovisice, Czechoslovakia, lives in New York.]

 I was repelled by the sleazy reality of the totalitarian countries: politicians were shameless. There were corruption, pollution, shoddy goods, long lines, and suicide everywhere, but the leaders kept boasting about their great achievements and bright tomorrows. I saw all this and tried to show it in my pictures as simply and straightforwardly as I could. All I wanted to do was record how all these poor people adapted to lies and suffering, how they got used to it, how, in fact they were bound to miss it when it was over. 

Rosalind Krauss
[Writer, critic, and historian, b. 1941, Washington, D.C., lives in New York.]

 ... photography is an imprint or transfer off the real; it is a photochemically processed trace causally connected to the thing in the world to which it refers in a manner parallel to fingerprints or footprints or the rings of water that cold glasses leave on tables. The photograph is thus generically distinct from painting or sculpture or drawing. On the family tree of images it is closer to palm prints, death masks, the Shroud of Turin, or the tracks of gulls on beaches. 

Mona Kuhn
[Photographer, b. 1969, São Paulo, Brazil, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The body is a place where our mind resides, and that’s what I’m photographing.