Yousuf Karsh
[Photographer, b. 1908, Mardin, Armenia, d. 2002, Boston, Massachusetts.]

 Look and think before opening the shutter. The heart and mind are the true lens of the camera. 

Joseph Kosuth
[Artist and theorist, b. 1945, Toledo, Ohio, lives in New York and Rome.]

 That celebrated marriage of science and art, photography, seemed at the time to join together how we look at the world, art, with how we were coming to know it, science. 

Diane Keaton
[Actress and photography collector, b. 1946, Los Angeles, lives in Los Angeles.]

 Permanence can only be found in the immortality offered by the click of a camera. Like it or not, life moves on as fleetingly as the photograph is enduring. 

Arthur Knight
[Writer and film critic, b. 1916, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, d. 1991, Sydney, Australia.]

 Through this bright world the photographer walks like a zombie, blind unless a camera is strapped around his neck. The one time he appears without it is when he visits the clearing at night and discovers there the corpse. His immediate reaction is to run home for his camera. Only in a photograph does reality become meaningful for him. (On the film “Blow-Up”) 

Tibor Kalman
[Graphic designer, b. 1949, Budapest, d. 1999, Dorado, Puerto Rico.]

 Could you blow this up really big and print it in the wrong color and tell everybody to go back to school and to remember that form ain’t worth shit anyway and that content ideas you big bunch of jerks rules make that part red or something ok? 

Nadav Kander
[Photographer, b. 1961, Tel Aviv, lives in London.]

 Just showing positive, expected images of beauty and airbrushing away the conditions that make us human seems like a deception to me. 

Idris Khan
[Artist, b. 1978, Birmingham, England, lives in London.]

 I try and grasp the essence of a particular work, fuck about with it on the computer, and then display all the essence of a complete work on the wall. 

Mark Klett
[Photographer, b. 1952, Albany, New York, lives in Tempe, Arizona.]

 Photos always seem to exist as sort of stuffy, unnecessary antiques that we put in a drawer—unless we take them out, put them in current dialogue, and give them relevance.