Mona Kuhn
[Photographer, b. 1969, São Paulo, Brazil, lives in Los Angeles.]

 The body is a place where our mind resides, and that’s what I’m photographing. 

Siegfried Kracauer
[Media critic and sociologist, b. 1889, Frankfurt, Germany, d. 1966, New York.]

 The question is whether the image decisively catches reality. (1930) 

Chris Killip
[Photographer, b. 1946, Douglas, Isle of Man, United Kingdom, lives in Boston.]

 I don’t like smiley pictures. A smile is a defense mechanism. It says, “You can’t have the real me but here’s my smile.” You get closer to the real person when they stop smiling. 

Nick Knight
[Photographer, b. 1958, London, England, lives in London.]

 I think photography has been wrestling with a burden of telling the truth, which I don’t think it was ever particularly good at. 

Jeff Koons
[Artist, b. 1955, York, Pennsylvania, lives in New York.]

 The entertainment industry, the advertising industry have taken [the] tools from the art world and made themselves much more politically potent. We are really devastated and very impotent right now. A photographer just working for an advertising company has a platform to be much more politically effective in the world than an artist. 

Jerzy Kosinksi (Jerzy Lewinkopf)
[Writer, b. 1933, Lodz, Poland, d. 1991, New York.]

 He felt an excessive appeal to the sense of sight was insidious and debilitating, a specious claim to the reproduction of the world as it really was. He resisted the lulling implication that knowledge was above all what was to be seen, and refused the passive luxury of the spectator's chair, the flattening of reality, time arrested in one angle of vision. He suspected that to submit to that vision would be to clog the active play of images that were fluent and mobile within each person, fantasy and emotion that written language alone would quicken. 

Franz Kafka
[Writer, b. 1883, Prague, d. 1924, Prague.]

 We photograph things in order to drive them out of our minds. 

Frieda Kahlo (Magdalena Carmen Frida Kahlo y Calderón)
[Artist, b. 1907, Mexico City, d. 1954, Mexico City.]

 When my father took my picture in 1932 after my accident, I knew that a battlefield of suffering was in my eyes. From then on, I started looking straight at the lens, unflinching, unsmiling, determined to show that I was a good fighter to the end. (On her father Guillermo Kahlo, 1871-1941, a photographer)