Nastassja Kinski
[Model and actress, b. 1959, West Berlin, Germany, lives in Los Angeles and Europe.]

 When I cannot get that moment of truth where you feel yourself opening up like a flower, I absolutely loathe the bloody camera. I can just feel this black hole eyeing me, sucking me in, and I feel like smashing it to smithereens. 

Sarah Kember
[Writer and critic, lives in London.]

 A photograph of the pyramids is an image-idea of the pyramids, it is not the pyramids. 

Kim Kardashian
[Television personality and socialite, b. 1980, Los Angeles, lives in Hidden Hills, California.]

 I love bathroom selfies. 

Milan Kundera
[Writer, b. 1929, Brno, Bohemia (now Czechoslovakia), lives in Paris.]

 Memory does not make films, it makes photographs. 

Yousuf Karsh
[Photographer, b. 1908, Mardin, Armenia, d. 2002, Boston, Massachusetts.]

 I try to photograph people’s spirits and thoughts. As to the soul-taking by the photographer, I don’t feel I take away, but rather that the sitter and I give to each other. It becomes an act of mutual participation. 

Antonin Kratochvil
[Photographer, b. 1947, Lovisice, Czechoslovakia, lives in New York.]

 I was repelled by the sleazy reality of the totalitarian countries: politicians were shameless. There were corruption, pollution, shoddy goods, long lines, and suicide everywhere, but the leaders kept boasting about their great achievements and bright tomorrows. I saw all this and tried to show it in my pictures as simply and straightforwardly as I could. All I wanted to do was record how all these poor people adapted to lies and suffering, how they got used to it, how, in fact they were bound to miss it when it was over. 

Beyoncé Knowles
[Singer and celebrity, b. 1981, Houston, Texas, lives in New York.]

 When I’m on the red carpet, I’m prepared for [the attention.] But the worst thing is on planes, when you’re asleep and you’re woken up by a camera flashing. That’s a little bit much. But what do you do? It’s a part of [being famous]. Unfortunately. 

Jerzy Kosinksi (Jerzy Lewinkopf)
[Writer, b. 1933, Lodz, Poland, d. 1991, New York.]

 He felt an excessive appeal to the sense of sight was insidious and debilitating, a specious claim to the reproduction of the world as it really was. He resisted the lulling implication that knowledge was above all what was to be seen, and refused the passive luxury of the spectator's chair, the flattening of reality, time arrested in one angle of vision. He suspected that to submit to that vision would be to clog the active play of images that were fluent and mobile within each person, fantasy and emotion that written language alone would quicken.