Kermit the Frog
[Muppet and Philosopher, b. 1955, WRC-TV, Washington, D.C., lives in Hollywood.]

 How important are the visual arts in our society? I feel strongly that the visual arts are of vast and incalculable importance. Of course I could be prejudiced. I am a visual art. 

Joseph Kosuth
[Artist and theorist, b. 1945, Toledo, Ohio, lives in New York and Rome.]

 That celebrated marriage of science and art, photography, seemed at the time to join together how we look at the world, art, with how we were coming to know it, science. 

Mark Klett
[Photographer, b. 1952, Albany, New York, lives in Tempe, Arizona.]

 Photos always seem to exist as sort of stuffy, unnecessary antiques that we put in a drawer—unless we take them out, put them in current dialogue, and give them relevance. 

Josef Koudelka
[Photographer, b. 1938, Biskovice, Moravia, Czechoslovakia, lives in Paris.]

 I don’t like captions. I prefer people to look at my pictures and invent their own stories. 

Antonin Kratochvil
[Photographer, b. 1947, Lovisice, Czechoslovakia, lives in New York.]

 Stalin said artists are the engineers of human souls. I wanted to show what happens to the soul when the engineers get through with it. 

Idris Khan
[Artist, b. 1978, Birmingham, England, lives in London.]

 A lot of people in the art world hate to use the word “Photoshop” like it’s cheating or easy or something. I say bollocks to that. For me, it’s my tool, my paintbrush if you like, and lets me create my own visual language. 

Arthur Knight
[Writer and film critic, b. 1916, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, d. 1991, Sydney, Australia.]

 Through this bright world the photographer walks like a zombie, blind unless a camera is strapped around his neck. The one time he appears without it is when he visits the clearing at night and discovers there the corpse. His immediate reaction is to run home for his camera. Only in a photograph does reality become meaningful for him. (On the film “Blow-Up”) 

Barbara Kasten
[Photographer, b. 1936, Chicago, Illinois, lives in Chicago.]

 The question is: Can I make a photograph that is truly abstract, or must photographs always be representational as reality is there at their core?