Rudyard Kipling
[Writer, b. 1865, Bombay, India, d. 1936, London.]

 There aren’t twelve hundred people in the world who understand pictures. The others pretend and don’t care. 

Nadav Kander
[Photographer, b. 1961, Tel Aviv, lives in London.]

 Just showing positive, expected images of beauty and airbrushing away the conditions that make us human seems like a deception to me. 

Ellsworth Kelly
[Artist, b. 1923, Newburgh, New York, d. 2015, Spencertown, New York.]

 I realized I didn’t want to compose pictures, I wanted to find them. 

Les Krims
[Photographer, b. 1943, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Buffalo, New York.]

 I am not a Historian, I create History. These images are anti-decisive moment. It is possible to create any image one thinks of; this possibility, of course, is contingent on being able to think and create. The greatest potential source of photographic imagery is the mind. 

Mark Klett
[Photographer, b. 1952, Albany, New York, lives in Tempe, Arizona.]

 So much of what we know, and what we think we know, about the land has first passed through someone's lens. The interesting thing is to make use of this history, not merely to be absorbed into it. For me, landscape photographs begin as the artifacts of personal moments. They get interesting when they become cultural commentary. 

Rinko Kawauchi
[Photographer, b. 1972, Shiga, Japan, lives in Kanagawa, Japan.]

 It’s not that I’m confident, but I feel it’s okay for me to continue taking photos. 

André Kertész
[Photographer, b. 1894, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1985, New York.]

 I do not document anything. I give an interpretation. 

Robert Kennedy
[Politician, b. 1925, Brookline, Massachusetts, d. 1968, Los Angeles, California.]

 I examined the pictures carefully, and what I saw appeared to be no more than the clearing of a field for a farm or the basement of a house. I was relieved to hear later that this was the same reaction of virtually everyone at the meeting, including President Kennedy. Even a few days later, when more work had taken place on the site, he remarked that it looked like a football field. (On aerial photographs that triggered the 1962 Cuban missile crisis.)