Franz Kafka
[Writer, b. 1883, Prague, d. 1924, Prague.]

 We photograph things in order to drive them out of our minds. 

Germaine Krull
[Photographer, b. 1897, Wilda, East Prussia, Germany (now Poland), d. 1985, Wetzlar, Germany.]

 The camera need not invent, manipulate or fool. It does not paint, nor does it imagine. The photographer is a witness, the witness of his time. 

Max Kozloff
[Critic, editor, and photographer, b. 1933, Chicago, Illinois, lives in New York.]

 Though infested with many bewildering anomalies, photographs are considered our best arbiters between our visual perceptions and the memory of them. It is not only their apparent ‘objectivity’ that grants photographs their high status in this regard, but our belief that in them, fugitive sensation has been laid to rest. 

Tibor Kalman
[Graphic designer, b. 1949, Budapest, d. 1999, Dorado, Puerto Rico.]

 Could you blow this up really big and print it in the wrong color and tell everybody to go back to school and to remember that form ain’t worth shit anyway and that content ideas you big bunch of jerks rules make that part red or something ok? 

Arthur Koestler
[Writer, b. 1905, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1983, London, England.]

 The “innocent eye” is a fiction, based on the absurd notion that what we perceive in the present can be isolated in the mind from the influence of past experience There is no perception of “pure form” but meaning seeps in, and settles on the image. 

Jeff Koons
[Artist, b. 1955, York, Pennsylvania, lives in New York.]

 The entertainment industry, the advertising industry have taken [the] tools from the art world and made themselves much more politically potent. We are really devastated and very impotent right now. A photographer just working for an advertising company has a platform to be much more politically effective in the world than an artist. 

Søren Kierkegaard
[Philosopher, b. 1813, Copenhagen, Denmark, d. 1855, Copenhagen.]

 With the daguerreotype everyone will be able to have their portrait taken—formerly it was only the prominent; and at the same time everything is being done to make us all look exactly the same—so that we shall only need one portrait. 

André Kertész
[Photographer, b. 1894, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1985, New York.]

 You do not have to imagine things; reality gives you all you need.