Peter Schjeldahl
[Writer and critic, b. 1942, Fargo, North Dakota, lives in New York.]

 There is an ineffable but fatal difference in attitude between people behaving naturally and people behaving naturally for a camera. 

Dennis Stock
[Photographer, b. 1928, New York, d. 2010, Sarasota, Florida.]

 The similarity between Van Gogh, Haiku poetry, and good photography is the concern for mortality. That things are very fleeting, that there are people who are more sensitive to death than others. The threat of time is of great concern to them. And the camera is a very appropriate instrument for many. 

Jo Spence
[Artist, photographer, and writer, b. 1934, London, d. 1992, London.]

 The one bright spot in this depression was the arrival of the pictures I had taken of my hospital experience... I was absolutely staggered at what I’d photographed. I couldn’t believe that I had seen so much and already forgotten it. I had already disavowed what had happened to me. But here were the photographs that my guardian self had taken—so much detail. This points up one of the advantages of photographing one’s traumas—before they become sealed over. 

Michael Snow
[Filmmaker, photographer, and artist, b. 1929, Toronto, Canada, lives in Toronto.]

 To extend the depth of what has been called ‘art’ into photography requires... making available to the spectator the amazing transformations the subject undergoes to become the photograph. 

Allan Sekula
[Photographer, writer, and theorist, b. 1951, Erie, Pennsylvania, d. 2013, Los Angeles.]

 Communications technologies—photographic reproduction, linked computers—provide strong tools for the instrumental channeling of human desire… disguised as a benign expansion of the field of human intimacy. (2002) 

Rebecca Solnit
[Writer, b. 1961, San Francisco, lives in San Francisco.]

 ...the questions a photographer raises may be more profound than the answers the medium permits. 

Maggie Steber
[Photographer, b. 1949, born in Electra, Texas, lives in Miami, Florida.]

 Every time we click the shutter, it’s like a new day, a new chance to make a clean start, to be original. It’s a very exciting and exhausting thing to do. 

Annie Sprinkle (Ellen Steinberg)
[Artist, writer, pornographer, educator, b. 1954, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, lives in Santa Cruz, California.]

 I’ve been putting out sexually explicit images of myself for years. I know this sounds bizarre, but somehow it makes me feel safer.