Paul Simon
[Musician, b. 1941, Newark, New Jersey, lives in New York.]

 She said the man in the gabardine suit was a spy
I said “Be careful his bowtie is really a camera” 

Peter Stackpole
[Photographer, b. 1913, San Francisco, d. 1997, Novato, California.]

 When my father saw me with this little camera at his stone yard, he said, “You don’t need that thing.” He reached into his pocket and took out a pencil and made a sketch of me in no time, and said, “This is all you need.” 

Saul Steinberg
[Artist, b. 1914, Râmnicu Sarat, Romania, d. 1999, New York.]

 It seems that photography has just been calisthenics, an illusion, an alibi for the real thing. 

Jock Sturges
[Photographer, b. 1947, New York, lives in San Francisco.]

 My work is, in fact, neutral. In fact, its very neutrality is one of the things that worries me about it sometimes. There’s sometimes not a lot of emotive passion in the work. Because I shoot long shutter speeds, people are necessarily very still, and the work is very, very plain and... neutral. That neutrality isn’t sexual by nature. My subjects are just there. So if you read sexuality into my pictures, beyond what’s inherent to a human being, then the work is acting as a Rorschach, and you’re evincing sexual immaturity or sexual malaise in your own life. I have to tell you, I am sometimes deeply suspicious of the sexual mental health of some of the people who point their wavering fingers at the morality, the art, of others. 

Michael Spano
[Photographer, b. 1949, Bronx, New York, lives in Brooklyn, New York.]

 All photographs are manipulated—reality doesn’t look like a photograph anyway. 

Alec Soth
[Photographer, b. 1969, Minneapolis, Minnesota, lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota.]

 Photography, for me, is a lot like web surfing in real life. 

Stephen Spender
[Writer, poet, and critic, b. 1909, London, England, d. 1995, London.]

 Dead friend, this picture proves there was an instant
When—mirror of midday—you sent
Shadow and light from living flesh into
The sensitive dark instrument. 

Doug and Mike Starn
[Artists, b. 1961, Absecon, New Jersey, live in Brooklyn, New York.]

 The only way for the creative mind to function is through anarchy. Art can’t flourish while bound to the concerns of previous generations. Photography, as a rule, has too many rules.