Dennis Stock
[Photographer, b. 1928, New York, d. 2010, Sarasota, Florida.]

 The similarity between Van Gogh, Haiku poetry, and good photography is the concern for mortality. That things are very fleeting, that there are people who are more sensitive to death than others. The threat of time is of great concern to them. And the camera is a very appropriate instrument for many. 

Paul Strand
[Photographer, b. 1890, New York, d. 1976, Oregeval, France.]

 The artist is one who makes a concentrated statement about the world in which he lives and that statement tends to become impersonal—it tends to become universal and enduring because it comes out of something very particular. 

W. Eugene Smith
[Photographer, b. 1918, Wichita, Kansas, d. 1978, Tucson, Arizona.]

 [I am] always torn between the attitude of the journalist, who is a recorder of facts, and the artist, who is often necessarily at odds with the facts. 

Doug and Mike Starn
[Artists, b. 1961, Absecon, New Jersey, live in Brooklyn, New York.]

 The only way for the creative mind to function is through anarchy. Art can’t flourish while bound to the concerns of previous generations. Photography, as a rule, has too many rules. 

Jean Paul Sartre
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1905, Paris, d. 1980, Paris.]

 Photographs are not ideas. They give us ideas. 

Stephen Shore
[Photographer, b. 1947, New York, lives in New York.]

 I wanted to make pictures that felt natural, that felt like seeing, that didn’t feel like taking something in the world and making a piece of art out of it. 

Alfred Stieglitz
[Photographer and curator, b. 1864, Hoboken, New Jersey, d. 1946, New York.]

 My photographs are a picture of the chaos in the world, and of my relationship to that chaos. My prints show the world’s constant upsetting of man’s equilibrium, and his eternal battle to reestablish it. 

Jason Salavon
[Artist, b. 1970, Indianapolis, Indiana, lives in Chicago.]

 When you start to think about you’re one of six and a half billion individuals—what uniqueness means in that kind of context... This idea that one’s identity is defined by the choices they make, the car they drive, the clothes they buy, the kind of couch they have—as one of the many ways of representing one’s identity—is interesting to me.