Susan Sontag
[Writer, theorist, and critic, b. 1933, New York, d. 2004, New York.]

 Photographs state the innocence, the vulnerability of lives heading toward their own destruction, and this link between photography and death haunts all photographs of people. 

Aaron Siskind
[Photographer, b. 1903, New York, d. 1991, Providence, Rhode Island.]

 We look at the world and see what we have learned to believe is there. We have been conditioned to expect... but, as photographers, we must learn to relax our beliefs. 

W. Eugene Smith
[Photographer, b. 1918, Wichita, Kansas, d. 1978, Tucson, Arizona.]

 I try to take what voice I have and I give it to those who don’t have one at all. 

W.G Sebald
[Writer, b. 1944, Bavaria, Germany, d. 2001, East Anglia, England.]

 One has the impression that something is stirring inside [photographs]—it is as if one can hear little cries of despair, gémissements de désespoir... as if the photographs themselves had a memory and were remembering us and how we, the surviving, and those who preceded us, once were. 

Peter Stackpole
[Photographer, b. 1913, San Francisco, d. 1997, Novato, California.]

 When my father saw me with this little camera at his stone yard, he said, “You don’t need that thing.” He reached into his pocket and took out a pencil and made a sketch of me in no time, and said, “This is all you need.” 

Louis Stettner
[Photographer, b. 1922, Brooklyn, New York, d. 2016, Saint-Ouen, France.]

 The photographs that remain strong and alive seem to be when your vision and reality are so inexorably wedded together it is impossible to separate them. 

Albert Sands Southworth
[Photographer, b. 1811, West Fairlee, Vermont, d. 1894, Charlestown, Massachusetts.]

 Into the practice of no other business or art was there ever such an absurd, blind, and pell-mell rush. From the accustomed labours of agriculture and machine shop, from the factory and counter, from the restaurant, coachbox, and forecastle, representatives have appeared to perform the work for which a life apprenticeship could hardly be sufficient for preparation... 

Henry Holmes Smith
[Artist and teacher, b. 1909, Bloomington, Illinois, d. 1986, San Rafael, California.]

 I think control is the wrong word. I would put it this way. You see a lovely girl across a crowded room and you walk toward her with hope in your mind. That’s the way [my] pictures are made.