Dmitri Baltermants
[Photographer, b. 1912, Warsaw, Poland, d. 1990, Moscow.]

 We photographers make magnificent shots of wars, fires, earthquakes, and murder: the grief of humanity. We would like to see photographs about joy, happiness and love, but on the same level of quality. I realize, though, that this is difficult. 

Christian Boltanski
[Artist, b. 1944, Paris, lives in Paris.]

 The more you work, the less you exist. I believe (at least, I used to believe, because I no longer think this is entirely true) that the artist is like someone carrying a mirror in which everyone can look and recognize themselves, so that the person who carries the mirror ends up being nothing. 

Cecil Beaton
[Photographer, b. 1904, London, d. 1980, Broad Chalke, Wiltshire, Great Britain.]

 Be daring, be different, be impractical; be anything that will assert integrity of purpose and imaginative vision against the play-it-safers, the creatures of the commonplace, the slaves of the ordinary. 

Bertolt Brecht
[Dramatist, director and poet, b. 1898, Augsburg, Germany, d. 1956, East Berlin.]

 Art is not a mirror held up to reality, but a hammer with which to shape it. 

Charles Baudelaire
[Writer, b. 1821, Paris, d. 1867, Paris.]

 All the visible universe is nothing but a shop of images and signs. 

Angela Bulloch
[Artist, b. 1966, Fort Francis, Ontario, Canada, lives in London.]

 The works often continue to evolve after they have been realized, simply by the fact that they are concerned with an element of change, or an inherent potential for some kind of shift to occur. 

George Bataille
[Philosopher and writer, b. 1897, Billon, Puy-de-Dôme, France, d. 1962, Paris.]

 ...specialist art photographers can produce nothing more than rather tedious technical acrobatics. Press photographs or film stills are much more pleasurable to look at and much livelier than the majority of masterpieces that are presented for the public’s admiration. 

Walter Benjamin
[Philosopher, critic, and theorist, b. 1892, Berlin, d. 1940, Port Bou, France.]

 An appreciation of the transience of things, and the concern to rescue them for eternity, is one of the strongest impulses in allegory.