Simone de Beauvoir
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1908, Paris, d. 1986, Paris.]

 Representation of the world like the world itself is the work of men, they describe it from their point of view which they confuse with absolute truth. 

Daniel Boorstin
[Historian and scholar, b. 1914, Atlanta, Georgia, d. 2004, Washington, D.C.]

 As individuals and as a nation, we now suffer from social narcissism. The beloved echo of our ancestors, the virgin America, has been abandoned. We have fallen in love with our own image, with images of our making, which turn out to be images of ourselves. 

Jorge Luis Borges
[Writer, poet, and librarian, b. 1899, Buenos Aires, Argentina, d. 1986, Geneva, Switzerland.]

 Islam asserts that on the unappealable Day of Judgment every perpetrator of the image of a living creature will be raised from the dead with his works, and he will be commanded to bring them to life, and he will fail, and be cast out with them into the fires of punishment. 

Bernd Becher
[Photographer, b. 1931, Siegen, Germany, d. 2007, Rostock, Germany.]

 All we did was to turn back the time to a photography of precision which is superior to the human eye. 

Malcolm Browne
[Journalist and photographer, b. 1931, New York, d. 2012, New Hampshire.]

 I had no point of view. I was concerned that [the photographs] be properly exposed, but since the subject was self-illuminated that wasn’t much of a problem. (On his 1963 photograph of self-immolation of South Vietnamese Buddhist monk Thich Quang Duc.) 

Olivo Barbieri
[Photographer, b. 1954, Carpi, Italy, lives in Milan.]

 I see the world as a temporary site-specific installation, structures, infrastructures, the foundation of our sense of belonging and our identity, seen from afar, as a great scale model: the city as an avatar of itself. 

Hippolyte Bayard
[Photographer, b. 1801, Breteuil-sur-Noye, France, d. 1887, Nemours, France.]

 The corpse which you see here is that of M. Bayard, inventor of the process that has just been shown to you. As far as I know this indefatigable experimenter has been occupied for about three years with his discovery. The Government, which has been only too generous to Monsieur Daguerre, has said it can do nothing for Monsieur Bayard, and the poor wretch has drowned himself. Oh the vagaries of human life...! (1840, written on his self-portrait as a drowned man made after he was beaten to the announcement of the discovery of photography by Louis-Jacques Mandé Daguerre.) 

Nancy Burson
[Photographer and artist, b. 1948, St. Louis, Missouri, lives in New York.]

 My work from the last 25 years has been asking people to see differently.