Harry Benson
[Photographer, b. 1929, Glasgow, Scotland, lives in New York.]

 I was next to Bobby [Kennedy] when he was shot. It was hideous. Part of me wanted to crawl away. I couldn’t… I still wake up in the night and think about it. I even remember the f-stop. It was 1.4. 

Dawoud Bey
[Photographer, b. 1953, Queens, New York, lives in Chicago.]

 Black people have been killed for directing their gaze at the wrong person. I want my subjects to reclaim their right to look, to see, to be seen. 

Edouard Boubat
[Photographer, b. 1923, Paris, France, d. 1999, Paris.]

 Millions of unnecessary photos are taken every day. People stand before the Pyramids and photograph them, when for three cents they could buy postcards which show them much better. 

Honoré de Balzac
[Writer, b. 1799, Tours, France, d. 1850, Paris.]

 The steam-engine was rejected as absurd, just as aerial navigation is today. So were gunpowder, the printing press, spectacles and the latest newcomer, the daguerreotype. If someone had gone up to Napoleon and told him that a building or a man is permanently represented by an image in the atmosphere, and that everything that exists possesses an intangible spectre which may nevertheless become visible, Napoleon would have had him put away in the asylum at Charenton, just as Richelieu dispatched the unfortunate Salomon de Cuax to the madhouse at Bicêtre when that Norman martyr came to him with the invention of the steamship. —And yet Daguerre’s invention demonstrates exactly what I have just said. 

Max Beckman
[Artist, b. 1884, Leipzig, Germany, d. 1950, New York.]

 The important thing is first of all to have a real love for the visible world that lies outside ourselves as well as to know the deep secret of what goes on within ourselves. 

Francis Bruguière
[Artist and photographer, b. 1879, San Francisco, d. 1945, London.]

 What lives in pictures is very difficult to define... it finally becomes a thing beyond the thing portrayed... some sort of section of the soul of the artist that gets detached and comes out to one from the picture. 

James Balog
[Photographer, b. 1952, lives in Boulder, Colorado.]

 In some cases, I allow the edge of the set, the edge of my own artificial, artistic imposition, to show up because I don’t want to hide from that. I want to acknowledge that there is a living human and a living eye and a living mind and a living heart responding to what’s going on out there. 

Olivo Barbieri
[Photographer, b. 1954, Carpi, Italy, lives in Milan.]

 I see the world as a temporary site-specific installation, structures, infrastructures, the foundation of our sense of belonging and our identity, seen from afar, as a great scale model: the city as an avatar of itself.