Max Bense
[Philosopher and theoretician, b. 1910, Strasbourg, France, d. 1990, Stuttgart.]

 The esthetic process in painting is directed toward creation: the esthetic process of photography has to do with transmission. 

Cecil Beaton
[Photographer, b. 1904, London, d. 1980, Broad Chalke, Wiltshire, Great Britain.]

 Be daring, be different, be impractical; be anything that will assert integrity of purpose and imaginative vision against the play-it-safers, the creatures of the commonplace, the slaves of the ordinary. 

Margaret Bourke-White
[Photographer, b. 1904, New York, d. 1971, Darien, Connecticut.]

 If anybody gets in my way when I'm making a picture, I become irrational. I’m never sure what I’m going to do, or sometimes even aware of what I do—only that I want that picture. 

Judith Butler
[Philosopher and theorist, b. 1956, Cleveland, Ohio, lives in Berkeley, California.]

 The critical image... must not only fail to capture its referent, but show its failure. 

Christian Boltanski
[Artist, b. 1944, Paris, lives in Paris.]

 I think that all human activity is stupid. Artistic activity is also stupid, but you can see it more clearly. 

Dawoud Bey
[Photographer, b. 1953, Queens, New York, lives in Chicago.]

 People say don’t stare. Through the photos, not only do I stare, but I allow viewers to stare at the subject, to see things that they cannot see with a casual glance. 

Peter Brook
[Theater director and producer, b. 1925, London, lives in London.]

 One view of photography is that it is a zen-like act which captures reality with its pants down—so that the vital click shows the anatomy bare. In this, the photographer is invisible but essential. A computer releasing the shutter would always miss the special moment that the human sensibility can register. For this work, the photographer’s instinct is his aid, his personality a hindrance. 

Brassaï (Gyula Halász)
[Photographer, b. 1889, Brassó, Transylvania, Hungary (now Romania), d. 1984, Eze, Alpes-Maritimes, France.]

 Chance is always there. We all use it. The difference is a poor photographer meets chance one out of a hundred times and a good photographer meets chance all the time.