Philip Jones Griffiths
[Photojournalist, b. 1936, Rhuddian, Wales, d. 2008, London.]

 The twentieth century was the time of photography, when almost everything of importance was recorded and considered true because it was photographed. Nowadays nearly anyone can produce a photograph of Ladybird Johnson standing on the grassy knoll with a smoking gun in her hand and no one can prove it’s a fake. 

Glenn Ligon
[Artist, b. 1960, Bronx, New York, lives in New York.]

 The impulse to reuse, recycle, and recontextualize is nothing new. What is new is the overabundance of images we have to choose from. The task is to see whether something can be made from them. I do not wish to add any more. (2012) 

Andreas Gursky
[Photographer, b. 1955, Leipzig, Germany, lives in Dusseldorf.]

 Paradoxically, this view of the Rhine cannot be obtained in situ; a fictitious construction was required to provide an accurate image of a modern river. (On his photograph Rhein II) 

Dennis Stock
[Photographer, b. 1928, New York, d. 2010, Sarasota, Florida.]

 You try to get spontaneous situations, and you also are obliged to create situations. It’s not uncommon among photographers. 

Arthur Tress
[Photographer, b. 1940, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Cambria, California.]

 In my old age I no longer see the difference between documentary and staged. (2012, age 71) 

Roger Ballen
[Photographer, b. 1950, New York, lives in Johannesburg, South Africa.]

 Nothing is staged. And nothing is already there. Everything is transformed through the camera. 

Douglas Crimp
[Writer, theorist and critic, b. 1944, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, lives in Rochester, New York.]

 The strategy of the [directorial] mode is to use the apparent veracity of photography against itself, creating one’s fictions through the appearance of a seamless reality into which has been woven a narrative dimension. (1980) 

Richard Misrach
[Photographer, b. 1949, Los Angeles, lives in San Francisco.]

 In spite of recent trends towards fabricating photographic narratives, I find, more than ever, traditional photographic capture—the “discovery” of found narratives—deeply compelling. 
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