Auguste Rodin
[Artist, b. 1840, Paris, France, d. 1917, Paris.]

 Mere exactitude, of which photography and moulage [life casting] are the lowest forms, does not inspire feelings. 

Jane Welsh Carlyle
[Writer, b. 1801, Haddington, Scotland, d. 1866, London, England.]

 Blessed be the inventor of photography! I set him above even the inventor of chloroform! It has given more positive pleasure to poor suffering humanity than anything else that has cast up in my time or is like to—this art by which even the poor can possess themselves of tolerable likenesses of their absent dear ones. And mustn’t it be acting favourably on the morality of the country? (1859) 

Ludwig Wittgenstein
[Philosopher, b. 1889, Vienna, Austria, d. 1951, Cambridge, England.]

 A picture held us captive. And we could not get outside it, for it lay in our language and language seemed to repeat itself to us inexorably. 

Robert Smithson
[Artist, b. 1938, Rutherford, New Jersey, d. 1973, Amarillo, Texas.]

 Photographs are the results of a diminution of solar energy, and the camera is an entropic machine for recording gradual loss of light. 

Susan Sontag
[Writer, theorist, and critic, b. 1933, New York, d. 2004, New York.]

 Cameras define reality in two ways essential to the workings of an advanced industrial society: as a spectacle (for masses) and as an object of surveillance (for rulers). The production of images also furnishes a ruling ideology. Social change is replaced by a change in images. The freedom to consume a plurality of images and goods is equated with freedom itself. 

Yve Lomax
[Artist and theorist, b. 1952, Dorset, lives in London.]

 Assuming that the photographic image comes in between and presents a front, am I to believe that the photographic image forms a cover... a mask or veil? Does the photographic surface cover over, conceal or hide something? That which mediates, does it mystify? Is the image a mask which perverts a basic reality... and evil appearance? I am reminded of the Marxist line which says that appearance and reality are quite distinct things. I ask myself: does the appearance of the image mark the disappearance, the absence, of that which is essentially true or real? 

Robert Doisneau
[Photographer, b. 1912, Gentilly, Val-de-Marne, France, d. 1994, Montrouge, France.]

 If you take photos, don’t speak, don’t write, don’t analyze yourself, and don’t answer any questions. 
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