Joseph Pulitzer
[Editor, publisher and businessman, b. 1847, Makó, Hungary, d. 1911, Charleston, South Carolina.]

 They call me the father of illustrated journalism. What folly! I never thought any such thing. I had a small newspaper, which had been dead for years, and I was trying in every way to build up its circulation. What could I use for bait? A picture, of course. 

Patrick Demarchelier
[Photographer, b. 1943, Le Havre, France, lives in New York.]

 Fashion is the opposite of the real, its worst enemy. Fashion photography is subversive; it makes you believe everything is true, whereas this could not be more false. It is the opposite of a mirror, a deformation. 

Salvador Dali (Salvador Felipe Jacinto Dalí Domènech, Marquis of Pubol)
[Artist, b. 1904, Figueres, Catalonia, Spain, d. 1989, Figueres, Spain.]

 Photographic data... is still and ESSENTIALLY THE SAFEST POETIC MEDIUM and the most agile process for catching the most delicate osmoses which exist between reality and surreality. The mere fact of photographic transposition means a total invention: the capture of a secret reality. 

Berenice Abbott
[Photographer, writer, teacher, b. 1898, Springfield, Ohio, d. 1991, Monson, Maine.]

 Unless they do their share of growing up to their responsibilities the photographer can languish or take up knitting. 

Werner Herzog
[Filmmaker, b. 1942, Sachrang, Germany, lives in Munich and Los Angeles.]

 For such an advanced civilization as ours to be without images that are adequate to it is as serious a defect as being without memory. 

Franz Kafka
[Writer, b. 1883, Prague, d. 1924, Prague.]

 Photography concentrates one’s eye on the superficial. For that reason it obscures the hidden life which glimmers through the outlines of things like a play of light and shade. One can’t catch that even with the sharpest lens. One has to grope for it by feeling. 

Paul Strand
[Photographer, b. 1890, New York, d. 1976, Oregeval, France.]

 Your photography is a record of your living, for anyone who really sees. You may see and be affected by other people’s ways, you may even use them to find your own, but you will eventually have to free yourself of them. That is what Nietzsche meant when he said, “I have just read Schopenhauer, now I have to get rid of him.” He knew how insidious other people’s ways could be, particularly those which have the forcefulness of profound experience, if you let them get between you and your own vision. 
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