Susan Sontag
[Writer, theorist, and critic, b. 1933, New York, d. 2004, New York.]

 Newer technology provides a nonstop feed: as many images of disaster and atrocity as we can make time to look at. 

Ansel Adams
[Photographer, b. 1902, San Francisco, d. 1984, Carmel, California.]

 I expect to retire to a fine-grained heaven where the temperatures are always consistent, where the images slide before ones eyes in a continual cascade of form and meaning. 

Hugo Ball
[Author, artist, and poet, b. 1886, Pirmasens, Germany, d. 1927, Sant'Abbondio, Switzerland.]

 The symbolic view of things is a consequence of long absorption in images. Is sign language the real language of Paradise? 

Nhem En
[Photographer, b. 1961, Kampong Leng, Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia, lives in Cambodia.]

 My only job was to photograph them, and it was someone else who tortured and killed these people. As a photographer, I had no right to beat, torture, or kill prisoners. I could not touch them. (En, official photographer at Khmer Rouge torture center Tuol Sleng, estimates he took photographs of 10,000 people arriving at the center. Eight survived.) 

Lee Miller
[Photographer and model, b. 1907, Poughkeepsie, New York, d. 1976, Sussex, England.]

 I took some pictures of the place [Hitler’s residence] and I also got a good night’s sleep in Hitler’s bed. I even washed the dirt of Dachau in his tub. 

Bert Hardy
[Photographer, b. 1913, London, d. 1995, Oxted, England.]

 Although I do not usually like taking pictures of corpses, I controlled my feelings of rage for long enough to take some; without such evidence, no one would believe that anything like this had ever happened. (On photographing the liberation of the Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp, April 19, 1945) 

Susan Sontag
[Writer, theorist, and critic, b. 1933, New York, d. 2004, New York.]

 The appetite for showing pictures of bodies in pain is as keen, almost, as the desire for ones that show bodies naked. 

George Rodger
[Photojournalist, b. 1908, Hale, Cheshire, England, d. 1995, Smarden, Kent, England.]

 When I discovered that I could look at the horror of Belsen—4,000 dead and starving lying around—and think only of a nice photographic composition, I knew something had happened to me and it had to stop. 
quotes 1-8 of 128
page 1 of 16 next page last page
display quotes