Jeff Wall
[Photographer, b. 1946, Vancouver, Canada, lives in Vancouver.]

 I’ve always felt that good art has to reflect somehow on its own process of coming to be. 

Man Ray (Emanuel Radnitsky)
[Artist, b. 1890, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, d. 1976, Paris.]

 Cut out the eye from a photograph of one who has been loved but is seen no more.
Attach the eye to the pendulum of a metronome and regulate the weight to suit the tempo desired.
Keep going to the limit of endurance.
With a hammer well-aimed, try to destroy the whole at a single blow.
(1932, describing “Object To Be Destroyed,” made using a metronome and the photographed eye of artist, lover and collaborator Lee Miller who left him.) 

Brian Duffy
[Photographer, b. 1933, London, d. 2010, London.]

 I went into a burning mode. I felt everything I had to do and say in photography had been done. [Irving Penn and Richard Avedon] fucked photography for us... They got there. (1979, On giving up photography and burning all his negatives)  

Robert Adams
[Photographer and writer, b. 1937, Orange, New Jersey, lives in Astoria, Oregon.]

 Nature photography… that acknowledges what is wrong, is admittedly sometimes hard to bear—it has to encompass our mistakes. Yet in the long run, it is important; in order to endure our age of apocalypse, we have to be reconciled not only to avalanche and hurricane, but to ourselves. 

Victor Burgin
[Artist and writer, b. 1941, Sheffield, England, lives in London.]

 A job the artist does which no-one else does is to dismantle existing communication codes and to combine some of their elements into structures which can be used to generate new pictures of the world. 

Christian Metz
[Writer and film theorist, b. 1931, Béziers, France, lives in France.]

 The person who has been photographed, not the total person, is dead, dead for having been seen. 

Louis Aragon
[Artist, poet, and writer, b. 1897, Neuilly, France, d. 1982, Paris.]

 For each man there awaits... a particular image capable of annihilating the entire universe. 

John Steinbeck
[Writer, b. 1902, Salinas, California, d. 1968, Sag Harbor, New York.]

 The camera is one of the most frightening of modern weapons, particularly to people who have been in warfare, who have been bombed and shelled for at the back of a bombing run is invariably a photograph. In the back of ruined towns, and cities, and factories, there is aerial mapping, or spy mapping, usually with a camera. Therefore the camera is a feared instrument, and a man with a camera is suspected and watched wherever he goes... In the minds of most people today the camera is the forerunner of destruction, and it is suspected, and rightly so. 
quotes 1-8 of 250
page 1 of 32 next page last page
display quotes