Francis Galton
[Polymath, explorer, anthropologist, inventor, meteorologist, statistician, b. 1822, Birmingham, England, d. Haslemere, Surrey, England.]

 [My composite portrait process] represents no man in particular, but portrays an imaginary figure possessing the average features of any group of men. These ideal faces have a surprising air of reality. Nobody who glanced at one of them for the first time, would doubt its being the likeness of a living person, yet, as I have said, it is no such thing; it is the portrait of a type and not of an individual. (1879) 

Henri Cartier-Bresson
[Photographer and painter, b. 1908, Chanteloup, France, d. 2004, Paris.]

 What counts are the little differences. “General ideas” mean nothing. Long live the details. A millimeter makes all the difference. 

Paul Strand
[Photographer, b. 1890, New York, d. 1976, Oregeval, France.]

 The artist is one who makes a concentrated statement about the world in which he lives and that statement tends to become impersonal—it tends to become universal and enduring because it comes out of something very particular. 

Robert Adams
[Photographer and writer, b. 1937, Orange, New Jersey, lives in Astoria, Oregon.]

 With a camera, one has to love individual cases. 

Annette Messager
[Artist, b. 1943, Berck-sur-Mer, France, lives in Paris.]

 I never take a picture of a face because a face is somebody, an arm is not recognizable as somebody. When you take a photograph of someone’s face, it identifies it as somebody, but if you take just a fragment, it’s everybody. It’s not one person. 

Tracey Moffatt
[Photographer, b. 1960, Brisbane, Australia, lives in New York.]

 My work may feature brown faces but it could be anybody’s story. 

Philip-Lorca diCorcia
[Artist, b. 1953, Hartford, Connecticut, lives in New York.]

 The more specific the interpretation suggested by a picture, the less happy I am with it. 

Ishiuchi Miyako
[Photographer, b. 1947, Gunma Prefecture, Japan, lives in Tokyo.]

 The world only starts to become evident through personal histories. In “Hiroshima,” I don’t photograph the several hundreds of thousands of deaths, but an encounter with just one woman wearing a dress, with the dress arranged so that the woman, who is still missing today, can come home at any time. 
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