George Bernard Shaw
[Writer, critic, and dramatist, b. 1856, Dublin, d. 1950, Ayot St. Lawrence, Hertfordshire, England.]

 I would willingly exchange every single painting of Christ for one snapshot. 

Sarah Kember
[Writer and critic, lives in London.]

 Computer manipulated and simulated imagery appears to threaten the truth status of photography even though that has already been undermined by decades of semiotic analysis. How can this be? How can we panic about the loss of the real when we know (tacitly or otherwise) that the real is always lost in the act of representation? 

Hiroshi Sugimoto
[Photographer, b. 1948, Tokyo, lives in New York.]

 When people call me a photographer, I always feel like something of a charlatan—at least in Japanese. The word shashin, for photograph, combines the characters sha, meaning to reflect or copy, and shin, meaning truth, hence the photographer seems to entertain grand delusions of portraying truth. 

Richard Avedon
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 2004, San Antonio, Texas.]

 A portrait isn’t a fact but an opinion—an occasion rather than a truth. 

Eleanor Antin
[Artist, b. 1935, New York, lives in San Diego, California.]

 I adore [photography’s] uneasy mix of fact and fiction—its dubious claim to truth—its status as history. 

Vik Muniz
[Artist, b. 1961, Sao Paulo, Brazil, lives in New York.]

 Illusions as bad as mine make people aware of the fallacies of visual information and the pleasure to be derived from such fallacies. 

Andy Grundberg
[Critic, curator, and educator, lives in Washington, D.C.]

 Facts cling to photographs like dust. 

Ruth Bernhard
[Photographer, b. 1905, Berlin, d. 2006, San Francisco.]

 What the human eye sees is an illusion of what is real. The black and white image transforms illusions into another reality. 
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