Roland Barthes
[Writer, critic, and theorist, b. 1915, Cherbourg, d. 1980, Paris.]

 A sort of umbilical cord links the body of the photographed thing to my gaze: light, though impalpable, is a carnal medium, a skin I share with anyone who has been photographed. 

John Updike
[Writer, b. 1932, Shillington, Pennsylvania, d. 2009, Boston, Massachusetts.]

 [W]e are drawn to photographs on museum walls, and to those in family albums as well. In just such a way (we think to ourselves), in sunlight indistinguishable from that of tomorrow afternoon, this woman, this child, this Indian chief posed; bodies now forever dissolved were in a certain instant bombarded by photons, were inarguably there. 

Vittorio Storaro
[Cinematographer, b. 1940, Rome, Italy, lives in Rome.]

 We are all made of flesh, of matter. And at the end, this matter is dissolved in light, and transformed into energy. It’s the Einstein formula. Energy is nothing but matter that is moving at the speed of light, squared. 

Milan Kundera
[Writer, b. 1929, Brno, Bohemia (now Czechoslovakia), lives in Paris.]

 Seeing is limited by two borders: Strong light, which blinds, and total darkness. 

Diane Arbus
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 1971, New York.]

 Lately I’ve been struck with how I really love what you can’t see in a photograph. An actual physical darkness. And it’s very thrilling for me to see darkness again. 

James Welling
[Photographer, b. 1951, Hartford, Connecticut, lives in Los Angeles.]

 ... I began showing the black border of the negative as part of the image, something I’d never done before. I began to realize that the edge of the negative represents the shadow of the camera, the opaqueness of matter. It casts a shadow on the negative, so it’s a photogram as well. 

Franz Kafka
[Writer, b. 1883, Prague, d. 1924, Prague.]

 Photography concentrates one’s eye on the superficial. For that reason it obscures the hidden life which glimmers through the outlines of things like a play of light and shade. One can’t catch that even with the sharpest lens. One has to grope for it by feeling. 

Saul Leiter
[Photographer, b. 1923, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, d. 2013, New York.]

 Some photographers think that by taking pictures of human misery, they are addressing a serious problem. I do not think that misery is more profound than happiness. 
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