Chuck Close
[Artist, b. 1940, Monroe, Washington, lives in New York.]

 The thing that interests me about photography, and why it’s different from all other media, is that it’s the only medium in which there is even the possibility of an accidental masterpiece. 

Eileen Cowin
[Photographer, b. 1947, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Santa Monica, California.]

 I begin with a drawing, then devise the wardrobe, color scheme, lighting and I come up with the perfect gesture. Everything is mapped out. 

Janet Malcolm
[Writer, b. 1934, Prague, Czechoslovakia, lives in New York.]

 The heavy odds against finding the desired… work of art in the mess and flux of life, as opposed to the serene orderliness of imagined reality, give a special tense dazzle and an atmosphere of tour de force to any photographs that succeed in the search. 

William Klein
[Photographer, b. 1928, New York, lives in Paris.]

 Quite deliberately, I did the opposite to what was usually done. I thought that an absence of framing, chance, use of the accidental and a different relationship with the camera would make it possible to liberate the photographic image. There are some things that only a camera can do. The camera is full of possibilities as yet unexploited. But that is what photography is all about. The camera can surprise us. We must help it do so. 

Brassaï (Gyula Halász)
[Photographer, b. 1889, Brassó, Transylvania, Hungary (now Romania), d. 1984, Eze, Alpes-Maritimes, France.]

 Chance is always there. We all use it. The difference is a poor photographer meets chance one out of a hundred times and a good photographer meets chance all the time. 

Thomas Demand
[Photographer, b. 1964, Munich, Germany, lives in Los Angeles.]

 [With my photographs] you have a [single, forever fixed] moment and my particular angle of vision. My tyrannical condition, as it were, is that I prescribe your vision. 

Joe Rosenthal
[Photographer, b. 1911, Washington, D.C., d. 2006, Novato, California.]

 I swung my camera around and held it until I could guess that this was the peak of the action, and shot. I couldn’t positively say I had the picture. It’s something like shooting a football play; you don’t brag until it’s developed. (On his photograph of U.S. Marines raising the American flag on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima.) 

Nan Goldin
[Photographer, b. 1953, Washington, D.C., lives in New York and Paris.]

 When you set up pictures you’re not at any risk. Reality involves chance and risk and diving for pearls. 
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