André Kertész
[Photographer, b. 1894, Budapest, Hungary, d. 1985, New York.]

 Have confidence in the inventions and transformations of chance. 

Joel Meyerowitz
[Photographer, b. 1938, New York, lives in New York.]

 For a street photographer like myself, randomness is everything, because that’s one thing the world has in abundance, and I am just passing through it with my snare. My camera is a snare. I can throw this sieve out there and I can capture things in it. And risking that gesture all the time is part of the joy of seeing, because I don't have to stretch a canvas, I don’t have to mix the paints, I don’t have to light the studio. I walk around in the world, which is bombarding me with sensations all the time. 

Frederick Sommer
[Photographer, b. 1905, Angri, Italy, d. 1999, Prescott, Arizona.]

 Art and accident are one. Art accepts what it finds. 

Diane Arbus
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 1971, New York.]

 One thing that struck me very early is that you don’t put into a photograph what’s going to come out. Or, vice versa, what comes out is not what you put in. 

André Breton
[Artist, writer, editor, and critic, b. 1896, Tinchebray, France, d. 1966, Paris, France.]

 Actually, it’s quite true that [Cartier-Bresson is] not waiting for anyone, since he’s not made any appointment, but the very fact that he’s adopting this ultra-receptive posture means that by this he wants to help chance along, how should I say, to put himself in a state of grace with chance, so that something might happen, so that someone might drop in. 

Roger Ballen
[Photographer, b. 1950, New York, lives in Johannesburg, South Africa.]

 A lot of photography is about the unexpected happening during the time that you do the work. So it’s not something that you can really predict. 

Edouard Boubat
[Photographer, b. 1923, Paris, France, d. 1999, Paris.]

 All my photographs are about meetings and about coups de foudre—love at first sight. To do that type of photography, one must wipe the canvas clean to prepare for chance encounters, be open and aware to such moments, otherwise it becomes a cliché—already seen and expected. 

William Klein
[Photographer, b. 1928, New York, lives in Paris.]

 Quite deliberately, I did the opposite to what was usually done. I thought that an absence of framing, chance, use of the accidental and a different relationship with the camera would make it possible to liberate the photographic image. There are some things that only a camera can do. The camera is full of possibilities as yet unexploited. But that is what photography is all about. The camera can surprise us. We must help it do so. 
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