Oscar Wilde
[Writer, b. 1854, Dublin, d. 1900, Paris, France.]

 The camera, you know, will never capture you. Photography, in my experience, has the miraculous power of transferring wine into water. 

William Klein
[Photographer, b. 1928, New York, lives in Paris.]

 So who can pin down photography? We’re drunk with images. [Sontag’s] sick of it. I’m sick of it. But we’re moved by old amateur photographs because they aren’t concerned about theories of photography or what a picture must be. They’re just photographs without rules or dogma. 
 I have always done the opposite of what I was trained to do... Having little technical background, I became a photographer. Adopting a machine, I do my utmost to make it malfunction. For me, to make a photograph is to make an anti-photograph. 

Tina Barney
[Photographer, b. 1945, New York, lives in Watch Hill, Rhode Island, and New York.]

 My theory is, the more pictures you take, the better you get. It’s like a sport. I never wait to get a particular shot because wonderful accidents can happen when you shoot a lot. 

Andreas Gursky
[Photographer, b. 1955, Leipzig, Germany, lives in Dusseldorf.]

 In retrospect I can see that my desire to create abstractions has become more and more radical. Art should not be delivering a report on reality, but should be looking at what’s behind something. 

William J. T. Mitchell
[Writer, theorist, and architect, b. 1944, Melbourne, Australia, lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 The myth of digital photography has things exactly upside down. Instead of making photography less credible, less legitimate, digitization has produced a general “optimization” of photographic culture, one in which better and better simulations of the best effects of realism and informational richness in traditional photography have become possible. 

Sally Mann
[Photographer, b. 1951, Lexington, Virginia, lives in Lexington.]

 Photography would seem to preserve our past and make it invulnerable to the distortions of repeated memorial superimpositions, but I think that is a fallacy: photographs supplant and corrupt the past, all the while creating their own memories. 

Errol Morris
[Documentary filmmaker, b. 1948, Hewlett, New York, lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.]

 ...we do not form our beliefs on the basis of what we see; rather, what we see is often determined by our beliefs. 
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