Malick Sidibé
[Photographer, b. 1935, Soloba, Mali, d. 2016, Bamako, Mali.]

 Photographs are reality: they never lie, and that’s important to me. 

Taryn Simon
[Photographer, b. 1975, New York, lives in New York.]

 There is no truth in photography. One can’t reproduce an absolute truth. That said, I don’t see [my photographs] as being any less truthful than any other photographs. 

Leon Golub
[Artist, b. 1922, Chicago, Illinois, d. 2004, New York.]

 People say: “But photographs are all lies.” That’s not the point. The lie is a truth, too. How the hell are we going to know what Kissinger looks like? Well, the photograph tells us one version; I’m trying to tell it also, but differently. 

Mark Twain (Samuel Langhorne Clemens)
[Writer, b. 1835, Hannibal, Missouri, d. 1910, Redding, Connecticut.]

 The sun never looks through a photographic instrument that does not print a lie. The piece of glass it prints is well named a “negative”—a contradiction—a misrepresentation—a falsehood. I speak feelingly of this matter, because by turns the instrument has represented me to be a lunatic, A Solomon, a missionary, a burglar and an abject idiot. (1866) 

Thomas Struth
[Photographer, b. 1954, Geldern, Germany, lives in Dusseldorf.]

 In certain cases, I asked people to stay fixed in their position, but the effect was already lost. Those photographs don’t work, because photography is so sensitive a medium that one can’t lie using it. (On his “Museum Photographs”) 

Katy Grannan
[Photographer, b. 1969, Arlington, Virginia, lives in Berkeley, California.]

 I’ve always thought the family album is really a fiction. This was my first realization that photographs lie. 

Douglas Crimp
[Writer, theorist and critic, b. 1944, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, lives in Rochester, New York.]

 The strategy of the [directorial] mode is to use the apparent veracity of photography against itself, creating one’s fictions through the appearance of a seamless reality into which has been woven a narrative dimension. (1980) 

Sarah Kember
[Writer and critic, lives in London.]

 Computer manipulated and simulated imagery appears to threaten the truth status of photography even though that has already been undermined by decades of semiotic analysis. How can this be? How can we panic about the loss of the real when we know (tacitly or otherwise) that the real is always lost in the act of representation? 
quotes 1-8 of 258
page 1 of 33 next page last page
display quotes