Alec Soth
[Photographer, b. 1969, Minneapolis, Minnesota, lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota.]

 Photography is a language. To communicate, you need to learn the language. The history of photography is like the vocabulary and influence is like a dialect. One shouldn’t be embarrassed about having an accent. 

Clement Greenberg
[Critic, b. 1909, New York, d. 1994, New York.]

 ...there is about him and some of his disciples too much art with a capital A, and too many swans in his park are only geese. (1942, on Alfred Stieglitz) 

Nan Goldin
[Photographer, b. 1953, Washington, D.C., lives in New York and Paris.]

 … I wrote myself in as the lover. Sometimes, the obsession lasted for years. It was photography as the sublimation of sex, a means of seduction, and a way to remain a crucial part of my subjects’ lives. A chance to touch someone with a camera rather than physically. 

William Claxton
[Photographer, b. 1927, Pasadena, California, d. 2008, Los Angeles.]

 Photography is jazz for the eyes. All I ask you to do is to listen with your eyes. 

Eve Arnold
[Photographer, b. 1913, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, d. 2011, London.]

 ...if you think of modern art like sex in all its forms—heterosexual, bisexual, homosexual, multipartnered, bestial, whatever, with absolutely no holds barred and with everything available and permissible—that would be “modern art.” 

Ishiuchi Miyako
[Photographer, b. 1947, Gunma Prefecture, Japan, lives in Tokyo.]

 …I have always thought that the darkroom is such a sexual place. Its smell is so strong. And if you do it with bare hands, it’s like you’re having sex. Photography has that quality; it engages the five senses. It possesses something like sexuality. 

A.D. Coleman
[Critic and writer, b. 1943, New York, lives in New York.]

 The past is always with us, in the form of our photographs, which we feel as we might a rosary, wearing them smooth with the fingering of our eyes. 

James Agee
[Writer, b. 1909, Knoxville, Tennessee, d. 1955, New York.]

 Walker [Evans] setting up the terrible structure of the tripod crested by the black square heavy head, dangerous as that of a hunchback, of the camera; stooping beneath cloak and cloud of wicked cloth, and twisting buttons; a witchcraft preparing, colder than keenest ice, and incalculably cruel. (On Walker Evans photographing three tenant farmer families in Hale County, Alabama, 1936) 
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