Garry Winogrand
[Photographer, b. 1928, New York, d. 1984, Tijuana, Mexico.]

 I don’t have anything to say in any picture. But you do, from your experience, surmise something. You do give a photograph symbolic content, narrative content... But it’s nothing to worry about! 

Vilém Flusser
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1920, Prague, Czechoslovakia, d. 1991, Prague.]

 He who writes must master the rules of grammar. He who shoots photographs needs only to follow the instructions as given by the camera.... This leads to the paradox that the more people shoot photographs, the less they are capable of deciphering them. 

Annette Kuhn
[Writer and theorist, lives in Lancaster, England.]

 A photograph can certainly throw you off the scent. You will get nowhere, for instance, by taking a magnifying glass to it to get a closer look: you will see only patches of light and dark, an unreadable mesh of grains. The image yields nothing to that sort of scrutiny; it simply disappears. In order to show what it is evidence of, a photograph must always point you away from itself. 

Diane Arbus
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 1971, New York.]

 [Photographs] are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you. (March, 1971, six months before her suicide) 

John Berger
[Writer and critic, b. 1926, London, d. 2017, Paris.]

 If everything that existed were continually being photographed, every photograph would become meaningless. 

Joel Meyerowitz
[Photographer, b. 1938, New York, lives in New York.]

 We think of photography as pictures. And it is. But I think of photography as ideas. And do the pictures sustain your ideas or are they just good pictures? I want to have an experience in the world that is a deepening experience, that makes me feel alive and awake and conscious. 

Arthur Tress
[Photographer, b. 1940, Brooklyn, New York, lives in Cambria, California.]

 I believe it is the photographer’s function to reveal that which is concealed, even if it be repugnant to the majority, not merely to record what we see around us. 

Richard Misrach
[Photographer, b. 1949, Los Angeles, lives in San Francisco.]

 I love the fact that a photograph is always open to interpretation—there is no fixed meaning. 
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