Roman Vishniac
[Photographer, b. 1897, Pavlovsk, Russia, d. 1990, New York.]

 I was living in Germany in the thirties, and I knew that Hitler had made it his mission to exterminate all Jews, especially the children and the women who could bear children in the future. I was unable to save my people, only their memory. 

Sally Mann
[Photographer, b. 1951, Lexington, Virginia, lives in Lexington.]

 Here is my theory of photography: I think pictures actually create memories. 
 I believe that photographs actually rob us of our memory. 
 When I remember my childhood, I remember pictures of my childhood; I don’t remember actual moments. Photographs are really subversive in that way. If those are the only memories we have, and we know that photography lies—or at least is very limited in its presentation of information—then what does that make your childhood? One big lie? 

Susan Sontag
[Writer, theorist, and critic, b. 1933, New York, d. 2004, New York.]

 To remember is, more and more, not to recall a story but to be able to call up a picture. 

Robert Frank
[Photographer and filmmaker, b. 1924, Zürich, Switzerland, lives in Mabou, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Canada, and New York.]

 It’s nice how film survives. It’s not the way photographs are. It’s still alive. A photograph is just a memory. 

Siegfried Kracauer
[Media critic and sociologist, b. 1889, Frankfurt, Germany, d. 1966, New York.]

 The image wanders ghostlike through the present. Ghostly apparitions occur only in places where a terrible deed has been committed. 

Shimon Attie
[Photographer, b. 1957, Los Angeles, lives in New York.]

 I think of my work as a kind of peeling back of the wallpaper of today to reveal the histories buried underneath. 
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