John Berger
[Writer and critic, b. 1926, London, d. 2017, Paris.]

 What served in the place of the photograph, before the camera’s invention? The expected answer is the engraving, the drawing, the painting. The more revealing answer might be: memory. 

Vicki Goldberg
[Critic and writer, St. Louis, Missouri, lives in New York.]

 When photography was invented, people had to make room in their minds for the idea that the dead would always be visible. 

Daido Moriyama
[Photographer, b. 1938, Ikeda-cho, Osaka, Japan, lives in Tokyo.]

 Most of what I want simply slips away like water flowing through a net, and always what remains are only vague, elusive fragments of images… that sink into countless strata in my mind. 

Olivia Parker
[Photographer, b. 1941, Boston, Massachusetts, lives in Manchester, Massachusetts.]

 Do photographs interfere with memory? Do we count on the image on the paper to be memory and leave the shifting shimmering vision in our minds behind? 

Ishiuchi Miyako
[Photographer, b. 1947, Gunma Prefecture, Japan, lives in Tokyo.]

 I cannot stop [taking photographs of scars] because they are so much like a photograph… They are visible events, recorded in the past. Both the scars and the photographs are the manifestation of sorrow for the many things which cannot be retrieved... 

Franz Kafka
[Writer, b. 1883, Prague, d. 1924, Prague.]

 We photograph things in order to drive them out of our minds. 

Susan Sontag
[Writer, theorist, and critic, b. 1933, New York, d. 2004, New York.]

 All photographs aspire to the condition of being memorable—that is, unforgettable. 

Roland Barthes
[Writer, critic, and theorist, b. 1915, Cherbourg, d. 1980, Paris.]

 Not only is the Photograph never, in essence, a memory... but it actually blocks memory, quickly becomes a counter-memory. 
quotes 1-8 of 192
page 1 of 24 next page last page
display quotes