Jayne Anne Phillips
[Writer, b. 1952, Buckhannon, West Virginia, lives in Boston, Massachusetts.]

 We take language into our minds; we read words in the same internal voice with which we think, remember, pray. But when we look at paintings or photographs, the reverse is true. If the image corresponds to our most intensely personal, yet archetypal, yearnings and memories, we don’t take the image in, we move out of ourselves into the image, as though it were another world, a hologram whose forms of light are ghostly angels, or a dream whose physical reality is suggested by what we see on the surface of a canvas or a page. We connect with the image as though we had lost it within our own memories and are now surprised to find it represented outside ourselves, vital and luminous, charged with energy. 

Brooks Atkinson
[Writer and critic, b. 1894, Melrose, Massachusetts, d. 1984, New York.]

 The virtue of the camera is not the power it has to transform the photographer into an artist, but the impulse it gives him to keep on looking. 

John Berger
[Writer and critic, b. 1926, London, d. 2017, Paris.]

 Human visual perception is a far more complex and selective process than that by which a film records. Nevertheless the camera lens and the eye both register images—because of their sensitivity to light—at great speed and in the face of an immediate event. What the camera does, however, and what the eye in itself can never do is to fix the appearance of that event. It removes its appearance from the flow of appearances and it preserves it, not perhaps forever but for as long as the film exists. 

Edward Weston
[Photographer, b. 1886, Highland Park, Illinois, d. 1958, Wildcat Hill, California.]

 The lens reveals more than the eye sees. Then why not use this potentiality to advantage? (1928) 
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