Richard Prince
[Artist, b. 1949, Panama Canal Zone, lives in New York.]

 My limitations or mistakes become a kind of freedom. Like when I photographed black-and-white pictures with color film, as I did in Three Women Looking in the Same Direction. Or when I inadvertently overexposed the film and got a bleached-out look, which happened in a recent “gang” called Live Free or Die. These mistakes always happen because I’m not a photographer. Practicing without a license is the way it’s been referred to. 

Daido Moriyama
[Photographer, b. 1938, Ikeda-cho, Osaka, Japan, lives in Tokyo.]

 I admit that photography can capture reality effectively and in detail, viewing a part of the world through its cold, scientific lens rather than with the eyes. But I prefer taking photographs without looking through the viewfinder. 

Adrian Piper
[Artist, b. 1948, Harlem, New York, lives in Hyannis, Massachusetts.]

 My work is an act of communication, and it’s important to me the way what I assert lands, and where it lands within someone who sees it. On the other hand, I also recognize fully and live by the principle that once the work leaves my studio, I cannot control the effects it has. 

Elizabeth Bowen
[Writer, b. 1899, Dublin, Ireland, d. 1973, London.]

 The charm, one might say the genius, of memory is that it is choosy, chancy and temperamental; it rejects the edifying cathedral and indelibly photographs the small boy outside, chewing a hunk of melon in the dust. 

Wolfgang Tillmans
[Photographer, b. 1968, Remscheid, Germany, lives in London.]

 If you go into a shoot with an idea, you only get that idea and you cut yourself off from the chance of getting a much better picture. And I guess that’s the problem that a lot of photographers probably have—that they don’t trust the situation they are putting themselves into. So they have a safety net and they don’t even try to leave that. But I find it intriguing to expose myself to somebody that I’ve not met, and see what happens. 

Alec Soth
[Photographer, b. 1969, Minneapolis, Minnesota, lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota.]

 With my photography, I’m a big believer in serendipity. The goal is to find the flow of things. 

Douglas McCulloh
[Photographer, b. 1959, Los Angeles, lives in Los Angeles.]

 Photographs should celebrate the contingent, the spontaneous, the incomplete, the fortuitous. Direct, unblinking vision should be coupled with deliberate indifference as to subject. The ironic goal is a scrupulous recording of whatever chance brings to hand. 

Diane Arbus
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 1971, New York.]

 The thing that’s important to know is that you never know. You’re always sort of feeling your way. 
quotes 97-104 of 112
first page previous page page 13 of 14 next page last page
display quotes