Thomas Struth
[Photographer, b. 1954, Geldern, Germany, lives in Dusseldorf.]

 I wanted to make photographs in which everything was so complex and detailed that you could look at them forever and never see everything. 
 In certain cases, I asked people to stay fixed in their position, but the effect was already lost. Those photographs don’t work, because photography is so sensitive a medium that one can’t lie using it. (On his “Museum Photographs”) 
 The point at which the photograph ceases to function as a metaphor is the point at which it is free to propose an experiential model. 
 I’m interested in photographs that have no personal signature. 
 [I]n general, my work is less about expanding the possibilities of photography than about re-investing it with a truer perception of things by returning to a simple method, one that photography had from the beginning of its existence. 
 If I look at my work from the beginning it is more the idea of trying to establish a kind of material that one can work with for the future, rather than making nostalgic images to record something that will later become lost. 
 The image of an empty landscape accommodates the medium of photography in so far as it always involves the present, despite being historically referential. 
 For me, making a photograph is mostly an intellectual process of understanding people or cities and their historical and phenomenological connections. At that point the photo is almost made, and all that remains is the mechanical process. 
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