Jeanloup Sieff
[Photographer, b. 1930, Paris, d. 2001, Paris.]

 I am totally superficial, I know. But I believe superficiality can be very serious, a defense against the gravity of things, a manner of discretion. 
 The impulse that led you to make an image is a thing that you cannot share with anyone, even if you explain it. What remains is a surface that will live its own life, that will belong to everybody. I accept that surface. 
 If I have caught myself struggling to remember, it was, if not a pretense, at least premature, in that I only ever used photography for my own pleasure—even if I then bewailed the vanished pleasure which my pictures brought back to me. 
 All aspects of photography interest me and I feel for the female body the same curiosity and the same love as for a landscape, a face or anything else which interests me. In any case, the nude is a form of landscape. There are no reasons for my photographs, nor any rules; all depends on the mood of the moment, on the mood of the model. 
 I’m proud of the two adjectives superficial and frivolous. 
 This moment has been, it has been precious, I felt it as precious and I made this image. This is what we are trying to say.