Alfred Stieglitz
[Photographer and curator, b. 1864, Hoboken, New Jersey, d. 1946, New York.]

 If you can imagine photography in the guise of a woman and you’d ask her what she thought of Stieglitz, she’d say: He always treated me like a gentleman. 
 Technically perfect, pictorially rotten. (Stieglitz’s standard comment on photographs he rejected for publication in The American Amateur Photographer.) 
 In photography there is a reality so subtle that it becomes more real than reality. 
 There is much, too much, back-patting in the ranks of photography. (1897) 
 When I photograph I make love. 
 My photographs are a picture of the chaos in the world, and of my relationship to that chaos. My prints show the world’s constant upsetting of man’s equilibrium, and his eternal battle to reestablish it. 
 The great geniuses are those who have kept their childlike spirit and have added to it breadth of vision and experience. 
 When we go through an exhibition of American photographs, we are struck by the conventionality of the subjects chosen; we see the same types of country roads, of wood interiors, the everlasting waterfall, village scenes; we see the same groups at doorsteps and on piazzas; the same unfortunate attempts at illustrating popular poetry; the same etc., etc., ad infinitum. (1892) 
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