Susan Sontag
[Writer, theorist, and critic, b. 1933, New York, d. 2004, New York.]

 By furnishing this already crowded world with a duplicate one of images, photography makes us feel that the world is more available than it really is. 
 To remember is, more and more, not to recall a story but to be able to call up a picture. 
 Though photographs, the world becomes a series of unrelated, free-standing particles; and history, past and present, a set of anecdotes and faits divers. The camera makes reality atomic, manageable, and opaque. It is a view of the world which denies interconnectedness, continuity, but which confers on each moment the character of a mystery. 
 To collect photography is to collect the world. 
 Surrealism lies at the heart of the photographic enterprise: in the very creation of a reality in the second degree, narrower but more dramatic than the one perceived by natural vision. 
 The Western memory museum is now mostly a visual one. 
 There is no such thing as a bad photograph—only less interesting, less relevant, less mysterious ones. 
 Photography is a kind of overstatement, a heroic copulation with the material world. 
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