Lewis Baltz
[Photographer, b. 1945, Newport Beach, California, d. 2014, Paris.]

 I used photography to distance myself from a world that I loathed and was powerless to improve. 
 I was living in Monterey, a place where the classic photographers—the Westons, Wynn Bullock and Ansel Adams—came for a privileged view of nature. But my daily life very rarely took me to Point Lobos or Yosemite; it took me to shopping centers, and gas stations and all the other unhealthy growth that flourished beside the highway. It was a landscape that no one else had much interest in looking at. Other than me. 
 It might be more useful, if not necessarily more true, to think of photography as a narrow, deep area between the novel and film. 
 I wanted [my photography] to appear as though the camera was seeing by itself. 
 …the questioning of the photograph in its relation to the reality, the interrogation of representation, the famous crisis of representation, really all took place before digital technology. Digital technology, you see, is not the villain here. (1998) 
 I never had any profound loyalty to the idea of photography as a medium but simply as the most efficient way of making or recording an image. 
 I assumed from the outset that photography was already art, and that I and other people working in photography were artists. I understand now that this was a minority point of view. 
 I think being a photographer is a little like being a whore: if you’re really really good at it, nobody will call you that. 
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