Laszlo Moholy-Nagy
[Artist, photographer, designer, and teacher, b. 1895, Bacsbarsod, Hungary, d. 1946, Chicago, Illinois.]

 The illiterate of the future will be ignorant of the use of camera and pen alike. (1936) 
 We have—through a hundred years of photography and two decades of film—been enormously enriched... We may say we see the world with entirely different eyes. 
 In photography we must learn to seek, not the “picture,” not the aesthetic of tradition, but the ideal instrument of expression, the self-sufficient vehicle for education. 
 The photographer is a manipulator of light; photography is a manipulation of light. 
 The invention of photography destroyed the canons of representational, imitative art. 
 In photography we possess an extraordinary instrument for reproduction. But photography is much more than that. Today it is [a method for bringing optically] some thing entirely new into the world. 
 The photogram can be called the key to photography because every good photograph must possess the same fine gradations between the white and black extremes as the photogram. 
 Men still kill one another, they have not yet understood how they live, why they live; politicians fail to observe that the earth is an entity, yet television has been invented: the “Far Seer”—tomorrow we shall be able to look into the heart of our fellow-man, be everywhere and yet be alone; illustrated books, newspapers, magazines are printed—in millions. The unambiguousness of the real, the truth in the everyday situation is there for all classes. The hygiene of the optical, the health of the visible is slowly filtering through. 
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