Lev Manovich
[Artist, theorist, and critic, b. 1960, Moscow, lives in New York.]

 ... the reason we think that computer graphics technology has succeeded in faking reality is that we, over the course of the last hundred and fifty years, have come to accept the image of photography and film as reality. 
 Any unique image that you desire probably already exists on the internet or in some database... the problem today is no longer how to create the right image, but how to find an already existing one. 
 The digital image annihilates photography while solidifying, glorifying and immortalizing the photographic. 
 We turn our own lives into an information archive by storing all our emails, SMS, digital photos, and other “digital traces” of our existence. 
 ... while in theory digital technology entails the flawless replication of data, its actual use in contemporary society is characterized by the loss of data, degradation, and noise; the noise which is even stronger than that of traditional photography. 
 Once we came to accept the photographic image as reality, the way to its future simulation was open. 
 ... what is faked [by the computerization of image-making], of course, is not reality, but photographic reality, reality as seen by the camera lens. In other words, what computer graphics have (almost) achieved is not realism, but rather only photorealism—the ability to fake not our perceptual and bodily experience of reality but only its photographic image. 
 During photography’s first decades, exposure times were quite long... So, similar to the drawings produced with the help of a camera obscura, which depicted reality as static and immobile, early photographs represented the world as stable, eternal, unshakable. 
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