Andy Grundberg
[Critic, curator, and educator, lives in Washington, D.C.]

 ...the worry over media manipulation of photographs pales beside the threat that we will be exposed to an unedited, unvetted picture world where all images seem equally important and equally trivial. 
 [Postmodern photography] implies the exhaustion of the image universe: it suggests that a photographer can find more than enough images already existing in the world without the bother of making new ones. 
 ...truth-telling may be an ethic, adopted by photojournalists as a behavior, but experience shows us that it is not embedded in the medium like silver salts in film. 
 Facts cling to photographs like dust. 
 The photograph suggests that our image of reality is made up of images. It makes explicit the domination of mediation. 
 Computer images, like camera images today, will be seen as representations of a simulated, second-degree reality with little or no connection to the unmediated world. This is one lesson we can learn from photographs, and especially from those of the last 25 years: images exist not to be believed, but to be interrogated. 
 In the future, readers of newspapers and magazines will probably view news pictures more as illustrations than as reportage, since they can no longer distinguish between a genuine image and one that has been manipulated. 
 ...photography repeats itself unconsciously and unavoidably, producing stereotypes that then are repeated ad infinitum. 
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