Henri Cartier-Bresson
[Photographer and painter, b. 1908, Chanteloup, France, d. 2004, Paris.]

 I regard myself still as an amateur, though I am no longer a dilettante. (Introduction to The Decisive Moment, 1952) 
 Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst. 
 I love painting. As far as photography is concerned, I understand nothing. 
 I was marked, not by Surrealist painting, but by the conceptions of Breton [which] satisfied me a great deal: the role of spontaneous expression and of intuition and, above all, the attitude of revolt. 
 All I care about these days is painting—photography has never been more than a way into painting, a sort of instant drawing. 
 As photojournalists we supply information to a world that is overwhelmed with preoccupations and full of people who need the company of images... We pass judgment on what we see, and this involves an enormous responsibility. 
 [Photography] can be like a passionate kiss, but also like a gunshot or a psychoanalyst’s couch. 
 Thinking should be done beforehand and afterwards—never while actually taking a photograph. 
quotes 1-8 of 77
page 1 of 10 next page last page
display quotes